January 28, 2016
12-1 pm ET

 

People make hundreds of decisions every day, weighing risks and benefits and coming to conclusions. In a perfect world, people are objective when they perceive risks and make decisions in climate and other domains. But psychological research suggests that this is not always how the human mind works.

In this webinar, they will consider examples in climate change and other politically charged domains, and present evidence-based strategies that can help improve communication.

The webinar is free. To register click here. Once registered, you will receive a confirmation email with log-in information.

Speaker: Dr. Ellen Peters, The Ohio State University

Dr. Ellen Peters is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Decision Sciences Collaborative at The Ohio State University. Her research focuses on understanding the basic building blocks of human judgment and decision making, including how critical information can be communicated to facilitate better decisions in health, financial, and environmental contexts. She is former President of the Society for Judgment and Decision Making, former Chair of FDA’s Risk Communication Advisory Committee, and is a current member of the National Academies committee on the Science of Science Communication. She is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, and the Society of Experimental Psychology. Her research has been funded extensively by the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health.

Visit changingclimate.osu.edu and greatlakesclimate.com to view previous webinars and other climate resources.

 

Date: Wednesday, April 29, 2015
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

In July, 2012, the world witnessed a shocking event when widespread melting occurred over the surface of 97% of the Greenland Ice Sheet. According to ice core records, the last time such widespread melting occurred was in 1889. What caused such widespread melt? Was it just the warm temperatures, or is it a more complicated situation? Register today!

Dr. Mary Albert and her Dartmouth graduate students happened to be on the Greenland Ice Sheet at just the right time to gather some evidence. They excavated samples of the refrozen surface melt layer to take back to the U.S. for study, where their team investigated the physical, chemical, and isotopic aspects of that layer. They also looked deeper into the ice sheet and investigated evidence from firn (old snow) cores that contained melt layers dating back to 1889. They discovered that both in 2012 and in 1889, the warming and soot that changed the snow albedo (reflectivity) had both been necessary to synergistically create the melt; neither factor alone could have achieved melt in the cold, high, dry snow regions on the ice sheet.

Alden Adolph is now working with Mary on a project in New Hampshire to investigate climate change, snow albedo, and land use change on a project that is much closer to home. In Greenland, the soot from forest fires travels long distances to end up on the snow, where it changes the albedo. In New Hampshire, soot and aerosols can come from similar distant sources, but also from very local sources like wood stoves down the street. Alden will show how engineers and scientists use evidence to examine the importance of snow albedo even here in New England. Alden will also share ways in which she inspires younger students in the field, so that they can share in the excitement of research. Please join us for this relevant webinar, to learn how scientists used evidence from multiple sources to learn what caused the recent big melt, and why understanding your regional albedo is important to your future.

Details

Title: Fire and Ice: Snow Albedo and Our Future
Target audience: K–12 educators
Date: Wednesday, April 29, 2015
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenter: Dr. Mary AlbertAlden AdolphLinda Morris

Registration

Register today to participate in this web seminar. Upon registering you will receive an e-mail confirmation including information about the program and suggested links to visit in preparation of the event. Additional information about the web seminar will be e-mailed to you days before the program.

Each web seminar is a unique, stand-alone, program. Archives of the web seminars and the presenters’ PowerPoint presentations will be available through the links on this web page. Learn more about the features of the web seminar and read answers to frequently asked questions from participants.

 

This NASA event is a Google Hangout and will be broadcast live on YouTube. Questions may be submitted during the Hangout using the comments section or via Twitter –use  #AskNICE

The AskNICE Professional Development events occurs every month on the third Thursday of the month from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM Eastern Time (US & Canada). Effective 11/21/2013 until 3/20/2014.  

Monday, September 8, 2014 at 7:30 Eastern Time

Mark McCaffrey, Director of Collaborative Partnerships at the National Center for Science Education, is the featured speaker this month for the Climate Stewards project. He will address the questions: How can we best provide learners with authentic data and current research into climate changes that are already occurring in the United States? What is the National ClimateAssessment and how can I use its resources in my classroom? What are some of the best online resources for teaching about climate challenges and energy responses, and how do they tie to the Next Generation Science Standards? In his presentation, Mark will provide an overview of the learning pathways developed for educators that help them unpack the National Climate Assessment. He will also highlight insights for educators from his book Climate Smart & Energy Wise including how to address doubt, denial and despair when teaching about these challenging topics. 

Following Mark's presentation, Cindy Schmidt, Director of NCAR's Climate Voices Science Speakers Network will provide an overview of the project which works bring climate scientists directly in touch with students and members of the community to discuss the local effects of a changing climate and possible ways to address impacts.

Please forward this invitation to all interested colleagues and networks

The Fine Print: Important Notes for participating in the Webinar

  • Plan to log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software and we want to be sure you are able to access the meeting at the assigned start time.    
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this Webinar. If you elect to use the phone number provided for audio +1 (951) 266-6126, access code: 546-482-116, you will be charged for a long distance call. You do not need an Audio Pin number to listen to the meeting.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 851-182-978

Learn about integrating climate change education into your classroom or informal education programming, get an introduction to regionally relevant climate science, and hear about how other educators have used these materials. The webinar will be presented by educators who have used the resources in their own teaching, both in the classroom and in place-based education.

Certificates of attendance for professional development contact hours can be requested after the webinar; instructions will be provided during the session.

The presentation will cover:

  • Ohio Sea Grant’s updated Great Lakes Climate Change Curriculum
  • climate and Great Lakes literacy principles
  • informal resources to supplement and expand lesson plans

This course explores the science of climate change. Students will learn how the climate system works; what factors cause climate to change across different time scales and how those factors interact; how climate has changed in the past; how scientists use models, observations and theory to make predictions about future climate; and the possible consequences of climate change for our planet. The course explores evidence for changes in ocean temperature, sea level and acidity due to global warming. Students will learn how climate change today is different from past climate cycles and how satellites and other technologies are revealing the global signals of a changing climate. Finally, the course looks at the connection between human activity and the current warming trend and considers some of the potential social, economic and environmental consequences of climate change.

Looking for fun, hands-on activities to engage your visitors, students and community on the topic of climate change?  Come to the New England Aquarium for a FREE training about these activities and climate change education. 

This training is ideal for classroom teachers and informal educators from various institutions hoping to engage students and adults around the topic of climate change. 

Why is climate change such a polarizing topic? How can environmental educators address this loaded issue in their communities and programs? This course is for environmental education professionals interested in applying current research in climate change communication and psychology to their educational programs. Students will learn about recent research on climate change psychology and climate change communication and how concepts from these fields can be incorporated into EE programming. For the final assignment, students will incorporate what they have learned in a lesson or action plan for their organization. Alternately, students can write a short reflective essay on climate change education practices in their community or organization based on concepts covered in the course. 

NOTE: This course is not about about climate change science or impacts but rather about effective practices for communicating about climate change through environmental education programs. This course is designed with North American educators in mind, although we are accepting a limited number of international participants. 

Dates: 2016-09-06  to 2016-10-28 

Course Size: Limited to 100 Students

Estimated Workload: 3-4 hours per week

Course Facilitator: Anne Armstrong, Anne Ferguson, Marianne Krasny

Wednesday, February 18th – 4:00pm PT/7:00pm ET

The National Climate Assessment, released in May of 2014, summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, touching on many disciplines: earth science, biology, human health, engineering, technology, economics, and policy. Explore the document with a lead NCA author, then learn about related educator resources with Minda Berbeco from the National Center for Science Education. Discover how to bring these resources into classroom lessons, engage students in data collection and analysis, share visualizations and citizen science projects. 

Focus this month will be on the Southwest region. Watch for additional regions to be featured in upcoming “Ask US” sessions.

Spring webinar series continues on Monday, April 25th at 3pm EDT (12pm PDT) 

Presented by: Ariana Sutton-Grier, NOAA National Ocean Service & lead for NOAA's Coastal Blue Carbon Team 

There is growing interest nationally and internationally in leveraging the carbon benefits (termed “blue carbon”) of coastal habitats in climate and coastal resilience policies.  Coastal wetlands (specifically mangroves, salt marshes, and seagrass meadows) have unique characteristics that make them incredibly efficient, natural carbon sinks with most carbon stored below ground in soils.  Protecting and restoring these ecosystems around the globe will help maintain all the societal benefits these ecosystems provide including the natural climate mitigation benefits, but also the food security, water quality, and storm protection benefits that enhance coastal communities and economies.
 
This presentation will discuss the state of the science and policy of blue carbon including: (1) incorporation of coastal wetland carbon in U.S. national climate, resilience, and conservation efforts; (2) potential steps to incorporate coastal wetlands in national greenhouse gas inventories as suggested by the 2013 International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Wetlands Supplement; and opportunities to include coastal wetlands in voluntary carbon markets.  The presentation will conclude by highlighting some of the most pressing blue carbon scientific gaps that need to be filled in order to support these developing policies.  
On behalf of the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program
 

Following the presentation there will be a few short informational announcements relevant to the ocean acidification communication community. Please forward this invitation to interested colleagues. We look forward to seeing you at this event!

More info on the series and upcoming webinars can be found here

 

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