Monday, April 11th at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

 

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project welcomes Margie Turrin & Dave Porter from Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory as our featured speakers this month.

Sea level change is one of the most visible connections between all our earth systems - oceans, atmosphere, ice, land, and of course life on earth – including us! Changes in sea level are measurable on local and a global scales providing an accessible way to connect climate to education – and there is data – lots of data! Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Polar Team has been measuring changes in ice sheets and oceans for decades, working in locations ranging from small motorboats with local Greenlandic fishermen to collect ocean temperature measurements up against the ice sheet, to large aircraft measuring the depth and surface changes of ice sheets from the air. All of these help us determine changes in sea level and develop predictions and impacts for the future. To make the data available and accessible we've developed ‘Sea Level Rise: Polar Explorer’ an interactive map based 'app'. The app offers an interactive guided tour through the many layers of science that impact sea level rise. Framed around a series of questions user can chose their own pathway and level of complexity, while exploring authentic science data in engaging and accessible ways. The app reinforces the NGSS science practice of asking questions around data. Join us for this quick dive into sea level change! 

 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar - Seriously, read this and save it for your reference: 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial 1-(562)-247-8321 for audio. The access code is: 761-870-253. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 113-282-707

 

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to our Web page 

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to our Listserv 

Thursday, March 26th - 3:30-4:45pm MT/4:30pm CT/5:30pm ET

The National Climate Assessment, released in May of 2014, summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, touching on many disciplines: earth science, biology, human health, engineering, technology, economics, and policy. Explore the document with a lead NCA author, then learn about related educator resources with Kristen Poppleton from the Will Steger Foundation. Discover how to bring these resources into classroom lessons, engage students in data collection and analysis, share visualizations and citizen science projects. Focus this month will be on the Great Plains region.  Watch for additional regions to be featured in upcoming “Ask US” sessions.

 

This event is a Google Hangout and will be broadcast live on YouTube. Questions may be submitted during the Hangout using the comments section or via Twitter –use  #AskNICE

The AskNICE Professional Development events occurs every month on the third Thursday of the month from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM Eastern Time (US & Canada). Effective 11/21/2013 until 3/20/2014.  

12:00 pm Pacific | 1:00 pm Mountain | 2:00 pm Central | 3:00 pm Eastern

Presenters: Cindy Shellito (University of Northern Colorado), Julie Bartley (Gustavus Adolphus College), Laura Triplett (Gustavus Adolphus College)

Registration deadline: Wednesday, April 6

Summary

This webinar will provide an opportunity to hear from geoscience faculty who connect climate literacy to learning about the Earth in their courses (more information on teaching sustainability). Cindy Shellito is the author of the InTeGrate module:Climate of Change and will talk about climate literacy principals and share examples of how to teach about them in a course. Julie Bartley and Laura Triplett are leaders of the Gustavus Adolphus College InTeGrate Implementation Program that works to weave climate science across the curriculum. They will talk about how contextualizing climate literacy principals is important in this work and the role of InTeGrate materials in supporting their efforts. The webinar will include 30 minutes of presentation and 25 minutes for discussion. Participants are encouraged to both ask questions of the presenters and discuss their own experiences connecting science to issues of justice.

 

Goals:

At the end of this webinar, participants will have

  • a strategy for increasing climate literacy in their courses
  • a link between climate literacy and the focus of their course
  • greater familiarity with InTeGrate principles and resources
  • new colleagues engaged in this work

 

Logistics

Time - 12:00 pm Pacific | 1:00 pm Mountain | 2:00 pm Central | 3:00 pm Eastern
Duration - 1 hour
Format - Online web presentation via Adobe Connect web conference software with questions and discussion. To join the webinar, please visit:http://serc.adobeconnect.com/integrate/ and follow the prompts.
Registration - Please register for this workshop by Wednesday, April 6, 2016 using the registration form
Preparation - There is no advance preparation required for this webinar.

Please email Alice Newman (anewman AT carleton.edu) if you have any questions about this event.

 

Presenters

Cindy Shellito, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Northern Colorado

Julie Bartley, Geology, Gustavus Adolphus College

Laura Triplett, Geology, Gustavus Adolphus College

In this web seminar, you will learn to use satellite data from NASA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) missions in your meteorology lessons. You will be introduced to websites containing authentic GOES and POES data and imagery files and be shown how to download and use the files with students. 

Register today!

The National Climate Assessment, released in May of 2014, summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, touching on many disciplines: earth science, biology, human health, engineering, technology, economics, and policy. Explore the document with lead NCA author, Sarah Trainor, then learn about related educator resources with Jessica Brunacini from the PoLAR Partnership.

Discover how to bring these resources into classroom lessons, engage students in data collection and analysis, share visualizations and citizen science projects. 

Focus this month will be on the Alaska region. Watch for additional regions to be featured in upcoming “Ask US” sessions.

Also explore the NCA Education Resources for the Alaska Region to help to unpack the key messages of the region and point to related, high-quality online resources.

This NASA event is a Google Hangout and will be broadcast live on YouTube. Questions may be submitted during the Hangout using the comments section or via Twitter –use  #AskNICE

The AskNICE Professional Development events occurs every month on the third Thursday of the month from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM Eastern Time (US & Canada). Effective 11/21/2013 until 3/20/2014.  

Spring webinar series continues on Monday, April 25th at 3pm EDT (12pm PDT) 

Presented by: Ariana Sutton-Grier, NOAA National Ocean Service & lead for NOAA's Coastal Blue Carbon Team 

There is growing interest nationally and internationally in leveraging the carbon benefits (termed “blue carbon”) of coastal habitats in climate and coastal resilience policies.  Coastal wetlands (specifically mangroves, salt marshes, and seagrass meadows) have unique characteristics that make them incredibly efficient, natural carbon sinks with most carbon stored below ground in soils.  Protecting and restoring these ecosystems around the globe will help maintain all the societal benefits these ecosystems provide including the natural climate mitigation benefits, but also the food security, water quality, and storm protection benefits that enhance coastal communities and economies.
 
This presentation will discuss the state of the science and policy of blue carbon including: (1) incorporation of coastal wetland carbon in U.S. national climate, resilience, and conservation efforts; (2) potential steps to incorporate coastal wetlands in national greenhouse gas inventories as suggested by the 2013 International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Wetlands Supplement; and opportunities to include coastal wetlands in voluntary carbon markets.  The presentation will conclude by highlighting some of the most pressing blue carbon scientific gaps that need to be filled in order to support these developing policies.  
On behalf of the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program
 

Following the presentation there will be a few short informational announcements relevant to the ocean acidification communication community. Please forward this invitation to interested colleagues. We look forward to seeing you at this event!

More info on the series and upcoming webinars can be found here

 

Where in the United States would the use of solar panels be most effective? This web seminar features the “Solar Cell Energy Availability From Around the Country” activity from MY NASA DATA. During this seminar you will become familiar with the activity by comparing the monthly averages of surface downward radiation in various locations around the United States and analyzing areas where the population would be more or less conducive to having solar panels. 

Register today!

NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project (CSEP) is collaborating with Federal, State and NGO partners to convene four climate-science workshops for formal and informal educators. Participants will hear from and interact with climate science, education and communication experts, and visit research facilities to explore foundational technologies and innovations in Earth-system research. This workshop in Silver Spring, Maryland will focus on the region and topical impacts of climate change, with a goal of connecting educators and their students/audiences to the best-available, science-based information and resources about climate change.

Register for the Silver Spring, Maryland workshop is open, however there are attendance limits for the workshop, and we are advertising them nationally.  Availability will be on a first come first serve basis, so register early for your workshop. Participation in the workshops is free, but attendees are responsible for arranging their own transportation, lodging and meals unless otherwise indicated in workshop details.  

All attendees will receive a certificate acknowledging their participation in the workshop as well as the number of professional development hours they have engaged in.  

Below are the location, date, location, and attendance limits for the upcoming workshop. Registration forms will be shut down when registration for that workshop has reached capacity. You will receive an email confirming your participation in the workshop. Attendance limits for the workshop is 100 educators.

Important Note: If you are a foreign national and wish to attend the workshops in Silver Spring, MD you MUST send an email to Peg Steffen, Peg.Steffen@noaa.gov

 

Climate Education Workshop: Detailed Information

Silver Spring, Maryland

Dates & Times: 

Wednesday, August 5th, 2015 8:00 am-4:30pm

 

Place: 

NOAA Science Center

1305 East West Highway

Silver Spring, MD 20910 

 

Important Note:

If you are a foreign national and wish to attend this workshop, you MUST note it in your registration and send an email to: Peg Steffen, Peg.Steffen@noaa.gov

 

Primary Contacts:  

Peg Steffen, Peg.Steffen@noaa.gov

Bruce Moravchik, Bruce.moravchik@noaa.gov

 

Featured Presentations:

  • An introduction to global climate models, including a user friendly version that can be run on a desktop computer, allowing students to explore the subject of climate change in the same way that research scientists do. 
  • Simulations and Activities for Modeling planetary energy balance, tree rings, paleoclimates, the greenhouse effect, climate sensitivity and future climate projection.
  • Climate change poses some formidable communication and education challenges, as well as opportunities.  Simulation-based role-playing games offer a growing opportunity to provide powerful educational experiences.

 

Featured Activities:

  • Hands-On with NOAA’s Science on a Sphere, and new flat screen app!
  • Explore the drivers for change in sea level in a new app that includes a question-driven tour and an exploration of data that scientists collect.
  • Hands-On Activities and Simple Computer-based Simulations for Climate Modeling Education
  • SMARTIC role playing simulation for Polar regions based on the U.S. Navy Fleet Arctic Operation Game.
  • Carbon Journeys simulation for students and a new Risk Reduction Simulation for coastal hazards that encourages thinking about uncertainty.  
  • Design your own transition to a low-carbon global economy with the En-ROADS simulation

 

Notes on Food & Lodging:

  • There is no cost to attend this workshop.
  • Participants must make their own travel and overnight arrangements.
  • Meals will not be provided, but participants will be informed of the numerous and inexpensive dining options in walking distance.

 

For questions concerning the workshop including location and program questions, contact the workshop lead:

Silver Spring, MD - peg.steffen@noaa.gov 

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This workshop is part of the White House Climate Education and Literacy Initiative

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