Dates & Times: Wed and Thu, August 3rd and 4th, 2016 from 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM ET

 

NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project (CSEP) is collaborating with Federal, State and NGO partners to convene four climate-science workshops for formal and informal educators. Participants will hear from and interact with climate science, education and communication experts, and visit research facilities to explore foundational technologies and innovations in Earth-system research. This workshop in Charleston, South Carolina will focus on the region and topical impacts of climate change, with a goal of connecting educators and their students/audiences to the best-available, science-based information and resources about climate change.

Registration for the Charleston, South Carolina workshop is open, however there are attendance limits for the workshop, and we are advertising them nationally.  Availability will be on a first come first serve basis, so register early for your workshop. Participation in the workshops is free, but attendees are responsible for arranging their own transportation, lodging and meals unless otherwise indicated in workshop details.

 

Place:

South Carolina Aquarium

100 Aquarium Wharf

Charleston, SC 29401

Tel. (800) 722-6455

 

Primary Contacts:

EV Bell, ev.bell@scseagrant.org

Liz Fly, Elizabeth.Fly@scseagrant.org

Jaime Thom, jthom@scaquarium.org

Dawn Davis, dawn_davis@nps.gov

 

Featured Presentations

  • Weather and Climate 101

  • The Rising Tide: Impacts of Sea Level Rise in Charleston

  • A Historical Perspective: Fort Sumter and Rising Sea Level

  • Coastal Resilience: Adapting to Change  

  • From Sea Turtles to Red Knots: Biological Impacts of Climate Change (Panel)

 

Featured Activities

  • Climate Icebreaker (NOAA)

  • Climate Change 20 Questions (COSEE SE/Sea Grant Activity)

  • Climate Resiliency (NOAA)

  • Climate Cart (SC Aquarium)

  • Red Knot Activity (SC Aquarium)

  • Sea Turtles and Climate Change (COSEE SE/Sea Grant Activity)

  • Carbon: The World Traveler (COSEE SE/SC Sea Grant Activity)

  • The Effects of Sea Level Rise on Salt Marshes

  • Climate Change Sleuthing: Using Technology to Investigate Charleston

  • Tours:

    • Fort Sumter National Park

    • SC Aquarium

    • Downtown Charleston

 

Notes - Workshop Costs, Food & Lodging:

  • There is no cost to attend this workshop.

  • Participants must make their own travel and overnight arrangements; please contact EV Bell for suggested location: ev.bell@scseagrant.org

  • Meals will not be provided; participants are welcome to bring their own lunch to the workshop or select from restaurants nearby. A list of suggested restaurants will be provided.

 

Join us on Monday, April 13th at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

There is increasing recognition of the significance of how Traditional Environmental Knowledge (TEK) can inform our understanding of the impacts of climate change and strategies for adaptation and mitigation. Indigenous people bring a collective knowledge of the land, sky and sea and provide a crucial foundation for community-based adaptation and mitigation. Indigenous knowledge has been long recognized as a key source of information and insight in domains such as forestry, traditional medicine, biodiversity conservation, resource management, impact assessment, and natural disaster preparedness and response. 
 
NOAA’s Climate Stewards Education Project is honored collaborate with Cultural Specialists from the Smithsonian Museum of the American Indian, Project Indigenous, and Educators from the University of Wisconsin-Extension to present this webinar on TEK, how it can inform our understanding of a changing climate's impacts on coastal and inland Indigenous people, and useful teaching materials to bring these ideas together. 
  • Dennis Zotigh, Kiowa, San Juan Pueblo and Santee Dakota, Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, will provide an opening song. 
  • Scott Frazier, Crow/Santee, Project Indigenous, will discuss climate change impacts on sacred sites/sacred places, and what TEK can offer in adapting to climate change impacts. 
  • Albert “Abby” Ybarra, Yaqui-Tohono O'Odham, Project Indigenous, will present Three Sisters Gardening, an ancient method of farming and how it can be used to connect youth to the earth, annual cycles of growth, and climate change. 
  • Cathy Techmann, University of Wisconsin-Extension, will present G-WOW “Gikinoo’wizhiwe Onji Waaban” (Guiding for Tomorrow), a climate service learning initiative integrating climate change research, TEK, and place-based evidence of climate change impacts on traditional Ojibwe lifeways to provide knowledge about what can be done to mitigate or adapt to a changing climate for people of all culture

Following the webinar, there will be an informal discussion of the topics presented. All attendees are invited to participate. There are limited spaces for this discussion, information on joining will be provided during the event.

Please share this opportunity will all interested colleagues and Networks.

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar

Important Information for participating in this Webinar. Seriously, read the following and save it for reference:

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting at the start time.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting using VOIP, dial +1 (415) 655-0059 for audio. The access code is: 926-695-389. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 126-553-435

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

 

NSTA continues to explore the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) by presenting a web seminar series focusing on the disciplinary core ideas. The fall series features four informative and interactive web seminars on physical science core ideas and three on Earth and space science. The series will continue in 2014 with web seminars on life science and engineering design.

The web seminar on the disciplinary core idea of Earth’s Systems addresses questions such as “What regulates weather and climate?” and “What causes earthquakes and volcanoes?”

This web seminar will provide guidance on:

  • why it's important for students to understand Earth's systems
  • how students' understanding of Earth's systems might progress over their K-12 education
  • how ideas that students have about Earth's systems can be leveraged during instruction; and
  • how to incorporate the scientific and engineering practices into instruction so students can deepen their understanding of Earth's systems

Monday, April 11th at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

 

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project welcomes Margie Turrin & Dave Porter from Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory as our featured speakers this month.

Sea level change is one of the most visible connections between all our earth systems - oceans, atmosphere, ice, land, and of course life on earth – including us! Changes in sea level are measurable on local and a global scales providing an accessible way to connect climate to education – and there is data – lots of data! Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Polar Team has been measuring changes in ice sheets and oceans for decades, working in locations ranging from small motorboats with local Greenlandic fishermen to collect ocean temperature measurements up against the ice sheet, to large aircraft measuring the depth and surface changes of ice sheets from the air. All of these help us determine changes in sea level and develop predictions and impacts for the future. To make the data available and accessible we've developed ‘Sea Level Rise: Polar Explorer’ an interactive map based 'app'. The app offers an interactive guided tour through the many layers of science that impact sea level rise. Framed around a series of questions user can chose their own pathway and level of complexity, while exploring authentic science data in engaging and accessible ways. The app reinforces the NGSS science practice of asking questions around data. Join us for this quick dive into sea level change! 

 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar - Seriously, read this and save it for your reference: 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial 1-(562)-247-8321 for audio. The access code is: 761-870-253. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 113-282-707

 

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to our Web page 

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to our Listserv 

On April 22, 2015 please join us for a live webinar showcasing The Wild Center’s Youth Climate Summit — designed by and for high school students. The Association of Science-Technology Centers (ASTC) and The Wild Center have teamed up to share a successful Youth Climate Summit format designed to engage high school students in climate literacy through meaningful dialogue and action planning on climate change. We will highlight this program through a two-hour webinar that will provide an overview of the Youth Climate Summit concept, impacts and outcomes for schools and students, and the planning resources available for free through our Youth Climate Summit Toolkit. Project Director Jen Kretser along with two summit students — Erin Weaver and Meadow Hackett — will be sharing their experiences.

Encouraged by US government leaders and interest by other science centers, our collective goal is to share this convening program format at no cost and support the development of at least 10 Youth Climate Summits across the international science museum community in 2015. We will offer all the organizational tools you will need along with connections to scientific experts in your region.

Climate literacy education continues to be an urgent issue and this program format allows for informal science institutions such as science centers, zoos, aquariums, and non-profits to join in the international effort. Youth Climate Summits have been found to be powerful vehicles for inspiration, learning, community engagement, and youth leadership development. Climate literacy with a focus on local climate impacts and solutions is a key component of the Youth Climate Summit. The project-based learning surrounding the creation of a unique, student driven, sustainability and Climate Action Plan promotes leadership skills applicable to and the tools necessary for a 21st Century workforce. This effort was highlighted as a commitment in support of theWhite House Office of Science & Technology Policy’s Climate Education and Literacy Initiative, with the goal of connecting American students and citizens with the best-available, science-based information about climate change. The meeting is being hosted by the Department of Energy office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy as part of their efforts to support Climate and Energy Literacy.

The Youth Climate Summit Toolkit can be accessed here.

This short video provides an overview of the Adirondack Youth Climate Summit.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE:

Wednesday, April 22
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET
Youth Climate Summit

Please join the webinar from your computer, tablet, or smartphone here:https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/327254349

You can also dial in using your phone:
   United States – +1 (872) 240-3312
   Access Code: 327-254-349

For anyone in the Washington DC area, we invite you to attend in person at the US Department of Energy. Please RSVP to:
Joshua Sneideman, Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow
Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
202-586-5695
joshua.sneideman@ee.doe.gov

NSTA continues to explore the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) by presenting a web seminar series focusing on the disciplinary core ideas. The fall series features four informative and interactive web seminars on physical science core ideas and three on Earth and space science. The series will continue in 2014 with web seminars on life science and engineering design.

The web seminar on the disciplinary core idea of Earth and Human Activity addresses questions such as “How do humans depend on Earth’s resources?” and “How do humans change the planet?”

This web seminar will provide guidance on:

  • which concepts are central to an understanding of Earth and human activity
  • how students' understanding of Earth and human activity might progress over their K-12 education; and
  • what students engaging in scientific and engineering practices to understand Earth and human activity looks like in the classroom

12:00 pm Pacific | 1:00 pm Mountain | 2:00 pm Central | 3:00 pm Eastern

Presenters: Cindy Shellito (University of Northern Colorado), Julie Bartley (Gustavus Adolphus College), Laura Triplett (Gustavus Adolphus College)

Registration deadline: Wednesday, April 6

Summary

This webinar will provide an opportunity to hear from geoscience faculty who connect climate literacy to learning about the Earth in their courses (more information on teaching sustainability). Cindy Shellito is the author of the InTeGrate module:Climate of Change and will talk about climate literacy principals and share examples of how to teach about them in a course. Julie Bartley and Laura Triplett are leaders of the Gustavus Adolphus College InTeGrate Implementation Program that works to weave climate science across the curriculum. They will talk about how contextualizing climate literacy principals is important in this work and the role of InTeGrate materials in supporting their efforts. The webinar will include 30 minutes of presentation and 25 minutes for discussion. Participants are encouraged to both ask questions of the presenters and discuss their own experiences connecting science to issues of justice.

 

Goals:

At the end of this webinar, participants will have

  • a strategy for increasing climate literacy in their courses
  • a link between climate literacy and the focus of their course
  • greater familiarity with InTeGrate principles and resources
  • new colleagues engaged in this work

 

Logistics

Time - 12:00 pm Pacific | 1:00 pm Mountain | 2:00 pm Central | 3:00 pm Eastern
Duration - 1 hour
Format - Online web presentation via Adobe Connect web conference software with questions and discussion. To join the webinar, please visit:http://serc.adobeconnect.com/integrate/ and follow the prompts.
Registration - Please register for this workshop by Wednesday, April 6, 2016 using the registration form
Preparation - There is no advance preparation required for this webinar.

Please email Alice Newman (anewman AT carleton.edu) if you have any questions about this event.

 

Presenters

Cindy Shellito, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Northern Colorado

Julie Bartley, Geology, Gustavus Adolphus College

Laura Triplett, Geology, Gustavus Adolphus College

 Friday, April 17 at 1:00 PM EDT

In this webinar, a panel of Arctic experts will present the booklet and outline how climate changes currently underway in the Arctic are a driver for global sea-level rise, offer new prospects for natural resource extraction, and have rippling effects through the world’s weather, climate, food supply and economy. The webinar will feature a presentation and Q&A session with:

Julie Brigham-Grette, Professor of Quaternary/Glacial Geology at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, Chair of the National Research Council’s Polar Research Board, and Co-Chair of the authoring committee of Lessons and Legacies of International Polar Year 2007-2008.

Stephanie Pfirman, Professor of Environmental Sciences at Barnard College and Co-Chair of the authoring committee of The Arctic in the Anthropocene: Emerging Research Questions.

James White, Director of the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, Professor of Geological Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and Chair of the authoring committee of Abrupt Impacts of Climate Change: Anticipating Surprises.

 

Arctic Matters: The Global Connection to Changes in the Arctic

Download the Booklet PDF

Register for the webinar

Interactive website — coming soon!

This booklet is an educational resource from the National Research Council’s Polar Research Board that introduces the threats and opportunities of the Arctic’s rapidly changing environment and explains why the Arctic matters — to all of us.

Viewed in satellite images as a jagged white coat draped over the top of the globe, the high Arctic appears distant and isolated. But even if you don’t live there, don’t do business there, and will never travel there, you are closer to the Arctic than you think.

Arctic Matters: The Global Connection to Changes in the Arctic draws on a large collection of peer-reviewed National Research Council reports and other national and international reports to provide a brief, reader-friendly primer on the complex ways in which the changes currently affecting the Arctic and its diverse people, resources, and environment can, in turn, affect the entire globe.

 

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) brings considerably more attention to climate and climate change than earlier curriculum standards. The session will explore what and how to teach climate in ways connected to NGSS's three dimensions: (science and engineering practices, cross-cutting themes, and disciplinary core ideas (DCIs)), especially the most connected DCI: Human Impacts. We welcome abstracts addressing innovative roles for scientists assisting educators, student engagement with real data, materials and approaches that attend to the climate-energy connection; exemplary curricular materials, successful out-of-school programs, and strategies for dealing with anti-science sentiments.

The live streams will begin 15 minutes before the session times. View the full program. Note: All times are in PST.

Spring webinar series continues on Monday, April 25th at 3pm EDT (12pm PDT) 

Presented by: Ariana Sutton-Grier, NOAA National Ocean Service & lead for NOAA's Coastal Blue Carbon Team 

There is growing interest nationally and internationally in leveraging the carbon benefits (termed “blue carbon”) of coastal habitats in climate and coastal resilience policies.  Coastal wetlands (specifically mangroves, salt marshes, and seagrass meadows) have unique characteristics that make them incredibly efficient, natural carbon sinks with most carbon stored below ground in soils.  Protecting and restoring these ecosystems around the globe will help maintain all the societal benefits these ecosystems provide including the natural climate mitigation benefits, but also the food security, water quality, and storm protection benefits that enhance coastal communities and economies.
 
This presentation will discuss the state of the science and policy of blue carbon including: (1) incorporation of coastal wetland carbon in U.S. national climate, resilience, and conservation efforts; (2) potential steps to incorporate coastal wetlands in national greenhouse gas inventories as suggested by the 2013 International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Wetlands Supplement; and opportunities to include coastal wetlands in voluntary carbon markets.  The presentation will conclude by highlighting some of the most pressing blue carbon scientific gaps that need to be filled in order to support these developing policies.  
On behalf of the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program
 

Following the presentation there will be a few short informational announcements relevant to the ocean acidification communication community. Please forward this invitation to interested colleagues. We look forward to seeing you at this event!

More info on the series and upcoming webinars can be found here

 

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