Featured Resources

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Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) Webinar Series
February 28, 2019

This webinar offers a guided tour of the CLEAN portal. Learn about the CLEAN collection of almost 700 climate and energy educational resources and the range of other supporting materials to help you effectively and accurately teach about climate...

Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) Webinar Series
March 4, 2019

This webinar introduces the Climate and Energy Literacy Principles and how they are integrated with the CLEAN collection of climate and energy resources. These principles provide the foundation for understanding the science behind climate and...

Week-long renewable energy training workshop
July 15, 2019 to July 18, 2019

The 2019 REcharge Academy has been announced!  This year we will be holding a four-day Academy in partnership with University of Rhode Island Coastal Resource Center, the GEMSnet Program, WINDWINRI, RealJobsRI and the North Kingstown RI Chamber. ...

Climate Literacy Webinar Series 2019
February 25, 2019

This webinar will feature the 2018 National Climate Assessment, key findings for the Northwest, and implications for Washington State. Resources and examples of activities that 9-12 educators can use to make climate change more locally relevant...

Teaching Climate Literacy

  • Climate and energy are complex topics. There are many ways to approach climate and energy depending on the grade level, course topics and instructional method.

Professional Development

Feb
25

The National Climate Assessment: Focus on the Northwest

February 25, 1:00-2:00 PST

National Climate Assessment Teaching Resources

  • Explore a series of guides for educators that focus on the regional chapters of the Assessment Report, helping to unpack the key messages of each region and point to related, high-quality online resources.

Case Studies

Unique and diverse youth programming models and student-driven initiatives that are advancing place-based climate solutions.

See case studies >>

Educational Resources

In this short, hands-on activity, students build simple molecular models of 4 atmospheric gases (O2, N2, C02, and methane), compare their resonant frequencies, and make the connection between resonant frequency and the gas's ability to absorb infrared radiation.

Students investigate how much greenhouse gas (carbon dioxide and methane) their family releases into the atmosphere each year and relate it to climate change.

This activity addresses climate change impacts that affect all states that are part of the Colorado River Basin and are dependent on its water. Students examine available data, the possible consequences of changes to various user groups, and suggest solutions to adapt to these changes.

In this activity, students calculate the cost of the energy used to operate a common three-bulb light fixture, and compare the costs and amount of CO2 produced for similar incandescent and compact fluorescent light bulbs.

This activity from the Department of Energy provides background information about solar ovens and instructions on building a simple model solar cooker.

In this activity, students learn about the energy sources used by their local utility provider to generate electricity, and work in small groups to evaluate the sustainability of either a renewable or non-renewable energy source used to generate electricity.

This static graph of changes in CO2 concentrations goes back 400,000 years, showing the dramatic spike in recent years.

This video documents how scientists, using marine algae, can study climate change in the past to help understand potential effects of climate change in the future.

Two graphs from the NASA Climate website illustrate the change in global surface temperature relative to 1951-1980 average temperatures. The NASA plot is annotated with temperature-impacting historic events, which nicely connect an otherwise challenging graphic to real-world events.

This short video discusses where carbon dioxide, the gas that is mainly responsible for warming up our planet and changing the climate, comes from.

This simulation was created by a student for students based on the Gaia Theory using the simulation of Daisyworld. Students will learn the concept of albedo and be able to discuss implications of changes in the system.

This is a real-time map of current drought conditions in the US, which can be zoomed to the state level, with access to many more resources at that level. Some of these include the National Drought Regional Summaries and animations of historical data.

This animation depicts real-time wind speed and direction at selected heights above Earth's surface, ocean surface currents, and ocean surface temperatures and anomalies.

An interactive that illustrates the relationships between the axial tilt of the Earth, latitude, and temperature. Several data sets (including temperature, Sun-Earth distance, daylight hours) can be generated.

This activity from the Department of Energy provides background information about solar ovens and instructions on building a simple model solar cooker.

An interactive simulation that allows the user to adjust mountain snowfall and temperature to see the glacier grow and shrink in response.

This simulation was created by a student for students based on the Gaia Theory using the simulation of Daisyworld. Students will learn the concept of albedo and be able to discuss implications of changes in the system.

This visualization focuses on public acceptance of climate science. The set of interactive maps illustrates public opinion on a variety of climate beliefs, risk perceptions, and policy support. The data is from the Yale Project on Climate Communication.

This activity from the Department of Energy provides background information about solar ovens and instructions on building a simple model solar cooker.

In this lab activity, students investigate how to prepare a biofuel source for conversion to a combustible product. The activity models how raw materials are refined to process liquid fuels.

In this short but effective demonstration/experiment, students investigate how thermal expansion of water might affect sea level.

This is a long-term inquiry activity in which students investigate locations they believe harbor cellulose-digesting microbes, collect samples, isolate them on selective media, and screen them for cellulase activity. These novel microbes may be useful for the production of cellulosic ethanol.

This is a hands-on inquiry activity using zip-lock plastic bags that allows students to observe the process of fermentation and the challenge of producing ethanol from cellulosic sources. Students are asked to predict outcomes and check their observations with their predictions.

This hands-on activity introduces students to the process of fermenting different carbohydrate sources into ethanol. Teachers demonstrate yeasts' inability to metabolize certain food sources.