This lab exercise is designed to provide a basic understanding of a real-world scientific investigation. Learners are introduced to the concept of tropospheric ozone as an air pollutant due to human activities and burning of fossil fuel energy. The activity uses, analyzes, and visualizes data to investigate this air pollution and climate change problem, determines the season in which it commonly occurs, and communicates the analysis to others in a standard scientific format.

A one day workshop for educators interested on learning to expand their climate change interpretation at their own institutions. Through a grant from NOAA, several institutions around the country have developed and thoroughly tested four storyboards that use visual aides to tell the story. Each storyboard has been developed keeping in mind how to effectively communicate climate change in a positive way that leads the listener to action. Lunch will be provided.

When, Where and Who

What

You can expect to gain:

  • Four visual narratives, suitable to be used on a spherical screen (such as Science on a Sphere®, Magic Planet®, or HyperGlobe®), flat screen, or handheld tablet.
  • Theory, based on social and cognitive sciences, used to develop the visual narratives.
  • Opportunities to practice and models for training other colleagues to use these materials.
  • A toolkit to take back to your institution - including the four visual narratives, background information about the theoretical basis for each narrative, relevant climate and ocean science information and videos that illustrate each visual narrative being used by an educator.

About Visualizing Change: Training and Tools to support Informal Educators

Visualizing Change is a 3-year grant funded by NOAA’s Office of Education to help build capacity in the informal science education field to more effectively use global data sets to communicate about climate change, its impact on coastal zones and marine life and how people are working to use scientific information to shape our world.

How

To register or for additional information, please email the contact person at your preferred location/date.

This is a FREE one-day workshop.  Lunch will be provided.  Participants are responsible for travel and parking costs. 

This e-workshop developed by the FrameWorks Institute in partnership with the New England Aquarium gives an introductory look at how interpreters can utilize Strategic Framing to more effectively communicate the ocean and climate change story with the public. If you are interested in learning more about how to use Strategic Framing at your institution consider applying to a NNOCCI Study Circle. See the New England Aquarium's partner page for more information.

This workshop functions best in a modern Web browser that supports HTML5. We recommend Google ChromeFireFoxSafari, or IE9.

Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

What's the latest in Antarctic paleo-climate research? This web seminar, targeting educators of students in grades 7-12, will introduce participants to the nation's newest ice core expedition… SPICE Core! Investigators seeking data from the past 40,000 years are drilling a 1500 meter ice core to study chemical isotopes, tiny particles called aerosols and atmospheric gases trapped in earth's great southern ice sheet. The goal is to investigate environmental change since the last glacial/interglacial transition. Why was the South Pole targeted? What criteria affect the specific site selection for drilling? What new kinds of technology were required? Dr. T.J. Fudge will answer your questions, and share what it's like to work in the Pole's extreme environment. Register today!

A related, video-enhanced educational activity, focusing on "Polar Science and Engineering", will be presented by Linda Morris for you to share with your students. The interactions modeled in the video between scientists and engineers will serve as the basis of a reflective activity, Drilling Back Through Time, that introduce the students in your classroom to the NGSS's "Scientific and Engineering Practices". Educational resources from the US Ice Drilling Program will be showcased.

Details

Title: SPICE Core: Investigating Past Climate at the South Pole
Target audience: Educators of students in grades 7-12
Date: Wednesday, December 10, 2014 
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenters: Dr. T. J. Fudge and Linda M. Morris

Underwritten by the U.S. Ice Drilling Program Office and the National Science Foundation
 

The International Academy of the Digital Arts & Sciences has chosen NOAA Climate.gov as one of five nominees for the annual Webby Awards for online excellence. We’re nominated in both the 'Government' and 'Green' categories. If you're a fan of our site, please consider voting for us in those categories.

Voting is open from now until April 24. You do have to register/login, but you can use your Facebook, Google, or Twitter logins, or an email address with no additional personal info.

Vote for Climate.gov in the Government category.

Vote for the "Teaching Climate" section in the Green category.

The Webby Awards is the Internet's most respected symbol of success (much like a Grammy or an Oscar), so it's an honor just to be nominated. Out of the millions of sites, videos, ads, and mobile apps in existence, and the tens of thousands that were submitted for consideration, only a handful of Nominees were selected by the Academy for The 18th Annual Webby Awards. 

If you are a regular visitor to the Teaching Climate section of NOAA Climate.gov, you are most likely familiar with our reviewed resources, videos, and professional development events. But those are just some of the features that NOAA Climate.gov has to offer.

Across our website's four main sections, we promote public understanding of climate science and climate-related events, to make our data products and services easy to access and use, to provide climate-related support to the private sector and the Nation’s economy, and to serve people making climate-related decisions with tools and resources that help them answer specific questions.

NOAA Climate.gov is a team effort.  It would not be possible to produce and publish the site without contributions from more than a dozen personnel from across NOAA and from among our valued partners. And, most especially, our nomination wouldn't have been possible without the work of NOAA's and its partners' world-class climate science research, data products, and services that are routinely featured in the site.  

We would greatly appreciate your support, and hope you keep visiting us! 

Vote for NOAA Climate.gov in the Government category.

Vote for NOAA Climate.gov's "Teaching Climate" section in the Green category.

 

A one day workshop for educators interested on learning to expand their climate change interpretation at their own institutions. Through a grant from NOAA, several institutions around the country have developed and thoroughly tested four storyboards that use visual aides to tell the story. Each storyboard has been developed keeping in mind how to effectively communicate climate change in a positive way that leads the listener to action. Lunch will be provided.

When, Where and Who

April 14 - National Aquarium, Baltimore, MD – Megan Anderson manderson@aqua.org

What

You can expect to gain:

  • Four visual narratives, suitable to be used on a spherical screen (such as Science on a Sphere®, Magic Planet®, or HyperGlobe®), flat screen, or handheld tablet.
  • Theory, based on social and cognitive sciences, used to develop the visual narratives.
  • Opportunities to practice and models for training other colleagues to use these materials.
  • A toolkit to take back to your institution - including the four visual narratives, background information about the theoretical basis for each narrative, relevant climate and ocean science information and videos that illustrate each visual narrative being used by an educator.

About Visualizing Change: Training and Tools to support Informal Educators

Visualizing Change is a 3-year grant funded by NOAA’s Office of Education to help build capacity in the informal science education field to more effectively use global data sets to communicate about climate change, its impact on coastal zones and marine life and how people are working to use scientific information to shape our world.

How

To register or for additional information, please email the contact person at your preferred location/date.

Explore the science of climate change, and how scientists study climate and make predictions using modeling. This NASA-funded course will take place over three weeks, both online and onsite at AMNH, and will be co-taught by Museum educators and climate scientists.

Funding is provided by NASA's Global Climate Change Education Program under Grant Number NNX10AB59A.

January session: Thursday, Jan 15th- 4:30-5:45pm ET 

Although 97% of active climate scientists agree that the earth is warming due to human activities, some polls have found that only 44% of American share this view. As an educator, you are likely to encounter people who have received information that conflicts with the accepted climate science, perhaps from sources that they trust. This session will help you better understand American's perceptions of climate change and provide tips for better communicating climate science.

Click here on the day of the event to connect to the Ask US session. (You can access this page about 10 minutes before the start)

This event is a Google Hangout and will be broadcast live on YouTube. Questions may be submitted during the Hangout using the comments section or via Twitter –use  #AskUS

Online Educator Professional Development on Earth System Science Topics from ESTEEM (Earth Systems, Technology and Energy Education for MUREP –Minority University Research and Education Program)

 

April 23rd at 6pm EDT (3pm PDT)

Ocean acidification is a complex phenomenon with profound consequences. Understanding complexity and the impact of ocean acidification requires systems thinking and collaboration, both in research and in education. Scientific advancement will help us better understand the problem and devise more effective solutions, but executing these solutions will require widespread public participation to mitigate this global problem. 

In an effort to help high school students understand today's science, the presenters have translated current systems-level ocean acidification research into a 5 week classroom module.  They will present this curriculum and provide guidance for easy implementation in high schools.  Thus far 13 different schools and over 1200 students have field tested this work – they have seen dramatic increases in engagement, and in students’ abilities to use inquiry and to challenge their mental models.  The lessons are hands-on, interdisciplinary, and specifically focus on systems thinking which has been shown to enable behavioral change.  

In this curriculum, students take on the roles of scientists and delegates as they investigate the consequences of the changing carbon cycle on the chemistry and biology of the oceans.  Students begin by critically assess different pieces of information through news articles and real-time data.  They combine their findings into a network diagram that interconnects key players of this system.  Students align themselves with stakeholders and design collaborative, cohesive experiments to test hypotheses and network properties.  They explore how carbon dioxide is produced as well as the consequences of increased CO2 levels on the pH of water, the integrity of seashells, and the life cycle of diatoms. In the culminating activity, students act as delegates when reconvening to discuss the systems consequences of ocean acidification. They make recommendations for further research, policy, and lifestyle changes.  

The module connects to other pertinent lessons being developed locally and globally and provides a clear connection to the Next Generation Science Standards and Ocean Literacy standards. 

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Space is limited.
Reserve your Webinar seat now at:
https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/229162946
After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

Following the presentation there will be a few short informational announcements relevant to the ocean acidfication communication community. Please forward this invitation to interested colleagues. We look forward to seeing you at this event!

More info on the series and upcoming webinars can be found here

This series is jointly sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries and Ocean Acidification Program.

A one day workshop for educators interested on learning to expand their climate change interpretation at their own institutions. Through a grant from NOAA, several institutions around the country have developed and thoroughly tested four storyboards that use visual aides to tell the story. Each storyboard has been developed keeping in mind how to effectively communicate climate change in a positive way that leads the listener to action. Lunch will be provided.

When, Where and Who

April 28 - Buttonwood Park Zoo, New Bedford, MA – Annette Brickley abrickley.edu@gmail.com

 

What

You can expect to gain:

  • Four visual narratives, suitable to be used on a spherical screen (such as Science on a Sphere®, Magic Planet®, or HyperGlobe®), flat screen, or handheld tablet.
  • Theory, based on social and cognitive sciences, used to develop the visual narratives.
  • Opportunities to practice and models for training other colleagues to use these materials.
  • A toolkit to take back to your institution - including the four visual narratives, background information about the theoretical basis for each narrative, relevant climate and ocean science information and videos that illustrate each visual narrative being used by an educator.

 

About Visualizing Change: Training and Tools to support Informal Educators

Visualizing Change is a 3-year grant funded by NOAA’s Office of Education to help build capacity in the informal science education field to more effectively use global data sets to communicate about climate change, its impact on coastal zones and marine life and how people are working to use scientific information to shape our world.

How

To register or for additional information, please email the contact person at your preferred location/date.

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