Monday, May 18, at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

The peoples, lands, and resources of indigenous communities in the United States, including Alaska and the Pacific Rim, face an array of challenges, many of which are exacerbated by climate change impacts. As one of the most marginalized demographics, the consequences of observed and projected climate change are already dramatically impacting Indigenous ways of life that have persisted for thousands of years. Both the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the Third National Climate Assessment acknowledge that the greatest opportunities for mitigating and adapting to climate impacts must include indigenous knowledge and perspectives.

This webinar will focus on the key findings from the Third National Climate Assessment emphasising findings from the chapter on Indigenous Peoples, Lands and Resources. Presentations will include discussions on access to traditional food, decreases in water quality and quantity and sea ice, and relocation of Native communities brought on by changing climate conditions.

Our Featured Presenters will include:

Following the webinar, there will be an informal discussion of the topics presented. All attendees are invited to participate. There are limited spaces for this discussion, information on joining will be provided during the event.

Please share this opportunity will all interested colleagues and Networks.

 
Important Information for participating in this Webinar. 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting at the start time.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting using VOIP, dial +1 (415) 655-0059 for audio. The access code is: 539-911-382. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to:http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 110-978-691

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

 

Consider joining MADE-CLEAR on a five-day professional development experience on climate change and its solutions led by experts in climate science and educational researchers. You will explore the science of climate change through activities, inquiry, and small group work on curriculum.  The Academy will be held at the University of Delaware’s Virden Center.

 

A one day workshop for educators interested on learning to expand their climate change interpretation at their own institutions. Through a grant from NOAA, several institutions around the country have developed and thoroughly tested four storyboards that use visual aides to tell the story. Each storyboard has been developed keeping in mind how to effectively communicate climate change in a positive way that leads the listener to action. Lunch will be provided.

When, Where and Who

April 28 - Buttonwood Park Zoo, New Bedford, MA – Annette Brickley abrickley.edu@gmail.com

 

What

You can expect to gain:

  • Four visual narratives, suitable to be used on a spherical screen (such as Science on a Sphere®, Magic Planet®, or HyperGlobe®), flat screen, or handheld tablet.
  • Theory, based on social and cognitive sciences, used to develop the visual narratives.
  • Opportunities to practice and models for training other colleagues to use these materials.
  • A toolkit to take back to your institution - including the four visual narratives, background information about the theoretical basis for each narrative, relevant climate and ocean science information and videos that illustrate each visual narrative being used by an educator.

 

About Visualizing Change: Training and Tools to support Informal Educators

Visualizing Change is a 3-year grant funded by NOAA’s Office of Education to help build capacity in the informal science education field to more effectively use global data sets to communicate about climate change, its impact on coastal zones and marine life and how people are working to use scientific information to shape our world.

How

To register or for additional information, please email the contact person at your preferred location/date.

ClimateChangeLIVE distance learning adventure, brings you a wealth of climate change education resources and programs from 17 Federal agencies and non-profit organizations! We offer educators, a source of trusted, science-based materials, which are correlated to science education standards. 

This webinar will highlight climate change education resources and programs from three of our partners. NOAA has a wealth of climate change education resources and programs to share with you. Learn about citizen science opportunities from Project Budburst. The Department of Energy will share the BITES (Buildings Industry Technology Electricity Scenarios) Tool which students can use to make policy changes in the four sectors and run scenarios to see how their changes impact CO2 output as well as primary energy source dependence. DOE will also highlight a variety of reliable sources of information related to energy concepts and data.

Presenters: Dept. of Energy, Project Budburst, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

In this hour-long webinar, a NASA scientist will share the current state of the 2015-2016 El Niño event, and will discuss whether this El Niño matched the predictions for how global weather patterns would be impacted. Participants will also learn how to use the GLOBE data visualization tools to compare and contrast the El Niño Student field campaign variables from schools around the world.

Dr. Kathleen Tierney, Director of the CU Boulder’s Natural Hazards Center and Dr. Kevin Trenberth from the Climate Analysis Section at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) will join facilitators Dr. Anne Gold of CIRES and Deb Morrison of University Colorado Boulder in an interactive panel discussion. 

These experts will discuss how scientists can forecast where extreme events will occur and their severity. They will cover what communities and governments  can do to increase resiliency to extreme weather events and how the scientific community can help prepare citizens and government. 

Join Us Monday, December 5 at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project is pleased to welcome Dr. Marianne Fatica, Consumer Safety Officer at the US Food and Drug Administration, as our featured speaker this month.

There are approximately 9.4 million reported cases of foodborne illness each year in the United States. Approximately 56,000 involve hospitalizations and 1,350 result in death. The Centers for Disease Control estimates 51% of these illnesses are attributed to plant commodities, 42% to land animal commodities, and 6% to aquatic animal commodities. Seasonality and temperature effects can impact crop production, animal production, and fisheries. 

This presentation will review how seasonal effects, temperature effects, and extreme weather due to a changing climate impact multiple factors in food production and safety including the growing, harvesting, packing, and holding of commodities for human consumption. 

The Food and Drug Administration’s Office of Analytics and Outreach Middle and High School Curriculum materials will be used to discuss how these factors and the potential impacts of climate conditions are considered during an outbreak scenario.    

Visit the NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project Web page for more information

Sign up to our Listserv to receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities.

Time: 3:30 p.m. ET / 2:30 p.m. CT / 1:30 p.m. MT / 12:30 p.m. PT

One of the key needs for successful implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards are resources that are well-aligned to the standards. The Educators Evaluating the Quality of Instructional Products (EQuIP) Rubric for science provides criteria by which to measure the alignment and overall quality of lessons and units with respect to the NGSS. The rubric is an effective tool that enables teachers and administrators, in teams or individually, to review existing instructional materials to determine what revisions are needed, provide constructive criterion-based feedback to developers, and identify exemplars/models for teachers' use within and across states. Register today!

The web seminar will provide guidance on:

  • the key attributes resources should have to meet the letter and spirit of NGSS
  • the structure and features of the rubric
  • using the rubric to select and supplement curriculum resources

Details

Title: Evaluating Resources for NGSS: The EQuIP Rubric
Target audience: Educators of grades K-12
Dates: Tuesday, July 29, 2014
Time: 3:30 p.m. ET / 2:30 p.m. CT / 1:30 p.m. MT / 12:30 p.m. PT
Duration: 90 minutes
Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenters: Brian J. Reiser and Joe Krajcik

Join them for this self-paced online course (Massive Open Online Course, MOOC).  The course will run over 4.5 weeks requiring a total of 20-25 hours to complete, start date is April 1, 2015.

Why is water at the heart of so much conflict in the American West? How have major cities and extensive agricultural systems been able to thrive in the Western United States despite most of the region being either a desert or semi-desert environment? How will a warming climate affect the availability and use of water in a region populated by tens of millions of people?

Join us in exploring these and other questions as we combine an overview of the science behind water and climate in the Western US with a survey of the major legal, political, and cultural issues focused on this precious resource.

You will hear from over 15 experts in water management, policy, and research in the West. We will start with history, politics and culture of water development in the Western US (module 1) and hydrology, water demand and climate in the Western US (module 2) before we dive into a case study around the Colorado River Basin (module 3) and explore controversial water issues (module 4).

This course will include many resources for educators. Educators can earn professional development credit by signing up for an parallel two credit hours course at the cost of $140.

This course is free and open to the public.  Register now!

 

Anne Gold, Associate Scientist and Science Educator, CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

Eric Gordon, Managing Director of Western Water Assessment, CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

7:30 pm Eastern Time

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project is honored to present Dr. John Holdren, Assistant to the President for Science and Technology and Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and Dr. Richard Spinrad, NOAA Chief Scientist as the featured speakers for our June, 2015 national webinar.

Dr. Holdren will discuss U.S. efforts to cut carbon pollution, prepare for climate impacts, and lead internationally through the President’s Climate Action Plan. He will describe how the Climate Action Plan is advancing science, including actionable information and tools useful to educators, to enhance understanding and awareness of climate risks and impacts. Dr. Holdren will also discuss the Office of Science & Technology Policy’s Climate Education and Literacy Initiative, an opportunity to advance collaboration on climate education, both inside and outside of government. Effective climate action depends on climate-literate students, citizens, and decision makers to develop and implement solutions. 

Dr. Spinrad will speak on citizen science and how it can be a valuable tool for science educators to help students connect with science as a constant and intimate part of their lives. That benefit reaches beyond formal and informal learning. Today, scientists and policy makers recognize the impact and unique value of doing citizen science “in our own backyards” to advancing our scientific understanding of climate change and the risks associated with it. Dr. Spinrad will further focus on the role of citizen science in developing climate indicators, and how this effort and your input will help us connect the dots between data and resilience in our communities nationwide.

Space is limited. Reserve Your Spot at:

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar

Please share this opportunity will all interested colleagues and Networks. 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar. Seriously, read the following and save it for reference:

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting at the start time.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting using VOIP, dial +1 (562) 247-8421 for audio. The access code is: 316-091-230. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 158-550-003

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

To join our email list and receive information on upcoming webinars, book club meetings, and access to archives, send an email tobruce.moravchik@noaa.gov. In the subject line type "Join The Climate Stewards Education Community”  

 

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