September 3, 2015 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM EDT

As part of the climate change goal, DOE is planning to host eight Regional Climate Change Impact Webinars as part of the MIE initiative. We are looking to host speakers who will discuss regional efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change impacts as they relate to the President's Climate Action Plan with a particular focus on engaging minority communities. 

Experts will provide findings from the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER), energy job strategies, and the National Climate Impact Assessment. As part of the QER discussion, we plan to share climate-based findings related to national security, resilience, the grid of the future, environment, grid siting, and shared transport. This discussion will outline federal energy policy objectives, proposals, and actions, particularly as they relate to climate change and resilience for underserved communities. For more information on the QER, please visit http://energy.gov/epsa/quadrennial-energy-review-qer. 

An expert on energy and climate change job strategies will discuss job opportunities by region as well as regional options for renewables and energy efficiency. We will share region-specific information about the energy workforce across a variety of energy sectors and experience levels. 

The final section of the webinar will focus on findings from the National Climate Assessment and their regional applicability to those communities who are disproportionally impacted by the effects of climate change. We hope to host regional experts who can share Assessment findings and provide potential tools for resilience among minority and tribal communities.

During this half-day symposium at the NSTA 2013 National Conference in San Antonio, scientists and education specialists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will discuss how NOAA collects, manages, and analyzes data about climate and how educators can access and use this data in the classroom. Participants will learn about websites and resources that utilize climate data, including drought, sea surface temperature, coastal water quality, and ocean acidification.

Attendance at the symposium requires conference registration.

Wednesday, March 23: 10:00 am Pacific | 11:00 am Mountain | 12:00 pm Central | 1:00 pm Eastern

This webinar will provide an opportunity to hear from geoscience faculty who connect the use of data and earth modeling to learning about the Earth in their courses. Becca Walker and Beth Pratt-Sitaula are the author and editor (respectively) of Ice Mass and Sea Level Changes, a UNAVCO-developed, geodesy-focused GETSI module that uses authentic geodetic data to introduce students to the scientific and societal aspects of sea level change. Kirsten Menking is the author of the InTeGrate module: Earth Modeling(coming live in the Fall) that develops students' qualitative and quantitative tools for constructing, experimenting with, and interpreting dynamic models of different components of the Earth system. The webinar will include presentations on specific teaching strategies/tools and will provide opportunities for discussion. Participants are encouraged to both ask questions of the presenters and discuss their own experiences of using data to teach about societally important issues.

For more information on the series and to learn more about InTeGrate visit: http://serc.carleton.edu/integrate/workshops/index.htm

Preparing for or responding to an environmental disasters requires knowledge from many disciplines and real time interdisciplinary problem solving. The interaction between the extreme event, people in its path and the response mechanisms of government and business combine at one place and time. How do we prepare students for careers where they can make useful and valuable contributions that mitigate risks and increase resilience in the face of a growing population and changing environment? What do students need to know about risk and resilience? What foundational knowledge will prepare them to communicate with, learn from, and work with experts from the range of disciplines that are needed to address these problems?

This workshop will bring together educators from the variety of disciplines that prepare students to address natural disasters with those currently engaged in addressing these challenges. Focusing on three case studies, we will share best practices in education to help students to understand needs of different stakeholders and to prepare students for careers related to hazard mitigation and adaptation. We will consider how partnerships among academia, civil society, and the business community will enhance both student learning and community preparedness. We will identify needs for curricular resources and discuss how to meet these needs.

This workshop is open to 30 faculty (by application) and there is no registration fee to attend. Participation for non-academics is by invitation. Workshop stipends are available to help defray travel expenses in cases of financial need. Accepted participants are expected to contribute teaching materials to a new web-based collection devoted to teaching about risk and resilience across the disciplines.

Thursday, May 5, from 6:30 to 8:00 pm Eastern time to learn about weather and the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission.

Types of weather, weather basics, extreme weather, monitoring extreme weather with satellites, and hands on investigations for students to collect data about weather- including GLOBE protocols, are topics that will be covered during this seminar. The presenters will also talk about the difference between weather and climate and will describe ground validation campaigns.

The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is an international satellite mission (NASA and JAXA) to provide next-generation observations of rain and snow. The GPM mission will help advance our understanding of Earth's water and energy cycles, improve the forecasting of extreme events that cause natural disasters, and extend current capabilities of using satellite precipitation information to directly benefit society. 

All participants will receive a certificate of participation and 100 Learning Center activity points for attending and completing the post-program evaluation. An archive and presentation slides will be available at the end of the program. 

Please visit the main web page of this program to see the description and find links to the biographical information about the presenter(s).

Grades: Elemntary, Middle and High

Speaker: Minda Berbeco, PhD, Programs and Policy Director, National Center for Science Education
Resources: Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN),PINEMAP, WSF Curriculum

How can educators teach children about local impacts of climate change? Where can they find good resources for activities and up-to-date scientific information from reputable sources? Minda Berbeco is the Programs and Policy Director at the National Center for Science Education. She will be talking about the newly released National Climate Assessment, a scientific and governmental resource that demonstrates the local impacts on climate change and projections for the future. She will present on how to bring the NCA into the classroom and what vetted resources are available. We will focus on resources to make climate change local and relevant.

Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

The energy we use to heat and light our homes, drive to work and school and watch our favorite television show can come from a variety of traditional and renewable energy sources -- crude oil, natural gas, wind farms, hydroelectric power and coal-fired power plants. But how do we understand the costs and benefits of the energy choices we make? What happens if the mix of energy sources changes in the future? What does this all mean for our climate, air, water, and overall environmental quality? Learn about the scientific tools EPA scientists are developing to help states, communities and Tribes make decisions about energy use now and in the future. Explore an interactive board game developed by EPA scientists called Generate! that explores energy choices and the environment and gets students “energized” in some friendly competition.

Details

Target audience: K-12 teachers
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenter: Dr. Rebecca Dodder

Application deadline is Monday, March 16, 2015

The National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation announces a professional development opportunity for interpreters who focus on climate change and ocean issues.

About the National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI)

NNOCCI is a collaborative effort led by the New England Aquarium with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, the FrameWorks Institute, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the National Aquarium in Baltimore, Monterey Bay Aquarium, the New Knowledge Organization in partnership with Pennsylvania State University and the Ohio's Center for Science and Industry. With support from the NSF Climate Change Education Partnership program, NNOCCI's goal is to establish a national network of professionals who are skilled in communicating climate science to the American public in ways that are engaging and stimulate productive dialog.

What is a Study Circle? 
A NNOCCI Study Circle is a cross-disciplinary learning group made up of peers with expertise from fields of professional interpretation, climate and ocean sciences and communications and cultural sciences. Through a series of facilitated in-person meetings, webinars, conference calls and practical activities, participants build knowledge of ocean and climate science and communications and cultural sciences. They apply lessons learned to communications or educational opportunities in the context of their work environment through several cycles of development, practice, sharing and reflection. Participants continue to build knowledge of ocean and climate science and communications and cultural sciences throughout the Study Circle, and gain resources and materials to train staff, volunteers, and other audiences at their home institutions.

The Study Circle has two major phases. During the first six months participants engage in a formal, facilitated learning process. Upon graduating participants join the larger network of colleagues and continue to experiment, evaluate and share successes from their work with each other. Through the Study Circle, participants will learn about the latest findings in climate science and oceanography and how to apply these to interpretive contexts in their home institutions. In addition participants build trust and lasting bonds among colleagues from multiple institutions who share an interest in developing effective ways to engage audiences in learning about climate and ocean change.

Who is the Study Circle for?
The Study Circle is intended for pairs of staff members from informal learning centers such as zoos, aquariums, science centers, National Parks, natural preserves, and other institutions that have an interest in coastal or ocean issues.

Costs and Compensation:
NNOCCI will pay for direct costs1 for participation in Study Circle activities that are not also part of participants' routine work. This includes travel, lodging and food for in-person meetings. NNOCCI will also provide a $3,000 stipend2 to up to 10 institutions which support two staff members to participate in the Study Circle.

Key Criteria:
Applicants should have institutional support before they apply. The institution should meet the following criteria:

  • Have an ocean or coastal ecology  connection within their work.
  • Have regular interpretation programming led by staff and/or volunteers.
  • Have interest in addressing issues related to climate change.
  • Be willing to support two staff members to fully participate in both the learning and evaluation phases of the Study Circle. Each applicant must fill out their own separate application.
  • Be willing to support NNOCCI’s evaluation efforts, which will entail an onsite visitor survey that the two staff members or volunteers will collect after presentations or other education programming. This survey effort will take place twice: 1) in the months immediately before the Study Circle meetings, and 2) six months after the training is complete.

Criteria for individual participants:

  • Able to commit to 3 in-person meetings (see dates, below) and about 3 hours/week of Study Circle work from approximately August 2015 through December 2015.
  • Able to commit to coordinating one-page visitor impact surveys at your institution several months prior to the first Study Circle and in the six months following the last Study Circle meeting.
  • Have regular opportunities to apply information and learning from the Study Circle through professional responsibilities such as interpretation for visitors, written communications, educational programming or presenting training for colleagues or volunteer interpreters.
  • Have supervisor support for full participation in the Study Circle.
  • Have a colleague who meets all of the criteria above as a co-applicant.

In Person Meeting Dates:*

Study Circle 'A'

  • September 16 and 17, 2015 (Boston, MA)
  • October 28 and 29, 2015 (Woods Hole, MA)
  • December 2 and 3, 2015 (location to be announced)

Study Circle 'B'

  • September 23 and 24, 2015 (Boston, MA)
  • November 4 and 5, 2015 (Woods Hole, MA)
  • December 9 and 10, 2015 (location to be announced)

*Please note that we are offering two distinct study circle options for Fall 2015. You and your partner must commit to the same study circle dates. If these dates do not fit for you and your institution, please note that additional Study Circles are being planned for and Spring and Fall 2016. 

How to apply:

Both applicants from an institution should submit a separate application. Click here to fill out the online application. Application deadline is Monday, March 16, 2015.

Please email nnocci@neaq.org with questions or concerns.

Please join us on Tuesday, September 1st at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project is pleased to present Lyndsey Manzo and Barbara Ikalainen for our September, 2015 webinar. Lyndsey and Barbara will discuss how they developed walking tours integrating innovative signage and mobile handheld technologies to teach students, educators and members of the public more about their local environments and the impacts of climate change. 

Lyndsey will present "The Climate Walk" - part of the Ohio State University’s Stone Laboratory student field trip program on Gibraltar Island in the western basin of Lake Erie – which consists of eight strategically placed stations that align with the Essential Principles of Climate Literacy and are accompanied by hands-on approaches to learning about climate change. This interactive place-based journey allows students to explore the impacts of climate change on their local environment, and provides educators with the ability to provide "on the fly" customized content in engaging formats. The Climate Walk is a model that can be replicated and used by formal and informal science educators in regions across the US. 

Barbara will present the process and outcomes of her NOAA Climate Stewards Grant "The North Shore Climate Awareness Project - Why Trees Matter". Barbara created an interactive walking tour of the 10 most interesting tree species on her college campus, posting signs and QR codes on trees allowing students, faculty and the public to instantly access detailed descriptions of that tree species, their carbon sequestration capabilities, and how they will be impacted by climate change in that region.
 

Please share this opportunity will ALL interested colleagues and networks.

 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar. Seriously, read the following and save it for reference: 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial +1 (562) 247-8321 for audio. The access code is: 597-874-782. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 120-411-787

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

 

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to our Listserv at: 

https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/noaaclimatestewards/

The GLOBE Surface Temperature Train-the-Trainer workshop will be held on Friday, April 12, 2013 at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA. Trainers, Partners, and Teachers certified in Surf Temp are invited to attend a FREE Surface Temperature training by Master Trainer & Lead Scientist for this protocol, Dr. Kevin Czajkowski.

Pages