NSTA continues to explore the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) by presenting a web seminar series focusing on the disciplinary core ideas. The fall series features four informative and interactive web seminars on physical science core ideas and three on Earth and space science. The series will continue in 2014 with web seminars on life science and engineering design.

The web seminar on the disciplinary core idea of Earth’s Systems addresses questions such as “What regulates weather and climate?” and “What causes earthquakes and volcanoes?”

This web seminar will provide guidance on:

  • why it's important for students to understand Earth's systems
  • how students' understanding of Earth's systems might progress over their K-12 education
  • how ideas that students have about Earth's systems can be leveraged during instruction; and
  • how to incorporate the scientific and engineering practices into instruction so students can deepen their understanding of Earth's systems

Thu, Jul 14, 2016 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM EDT

Heading into the middle of summer, temperatures are starting to heat up. As the temperatures rise, the risk of heat-related climate impacts also grows. CUSP (Climate & Urban Systems Partnership) climate scientists will provide an update on the summer forecast, providing insight on just how hot it may be over the next several weeks. They will also identify vulnerable population groups within our urban environments and the types of impacts that may occur during extreme heat events, which are projected to become more frequent and intense in the future with climate change. Also joining us will be CUSP partners from the Philadelphia Department of Public Health who will discuss their community engagement plans around the topic of climate change and health. Hope you can attend for a lively discussion!

Webinar 2: Tuesday, October 21 – 6:30 pm EST / 3:30 PST/ 12:30 HST (90 min)

Join us for the second of two webinars for an introduction to our newest NOAA Data in the Classroom curriculum module – Investigating Coral Bleaching Using Real Data. You'll hear from NOAA experts about coral bleaching and how scientists use remote sensing tools to study stresses on coral health. The NODE curriculum developers will introduce the new lesson plans and demonstrate how our unique scaffolding can help students develop skills to access and use online data.

The NOAA Data in the Classroom Project develops curriculum designed to help teachers and students use real scientific data to explore dynamic Earth processes and understand the impact of environmental events on a regional or global scale. Each curriculum module features easy-to-use curriculum materials and specially designed websites that enable students to access and use real data. Our newest curriculum module – Investigating Coral Bleaching Using Real Data – is being developed for grades 6-8.

  • Guided walk-thru of curriculum lesson plans
  • Building students' capabilities using real data
  • Using NGSS, Disciplinary Core Ideas, and Cross Cutting Concepts
  • Climate Literacy and Coral Bleaching

​Please join the NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project on Tuesday, November 3rd at 7:30 pmEastern Time

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project is Pleased to welcome Ms. Tarlise "Tarlie" Townsend from the University of Michigan Ford School of Public Policy as the featured speaker for our November webinar. 

Does uncertainty about the impacts of climate change suggests that scientists aren’t sure climate change is even happening? Or, perhaps, that we should wait to take mitigation or resilience actions until further research reduces that uncertainty? These are a few of the questions students might raise about the uncertainty in climate change predictions. Ms. Townsend will address them in part one of her presentation, discussing the sources of uncertainty in climate projections, what uncertainty means for scientific consensus, and how it can actually be harnessed to make better mitigation and resilience decisions. 

One takeaway will be that effective use of uncertainty information requires close attention to what’s communicated by the media, scientists, and interest groups. In the second part of her presentation, Ms. Townsend will point out common strategies for framing risk and uncertainty information, highlighting ways that students can be smart information consumers to avoid being misled. 

 

Please share this opportunity will ALL interested colleagues and networks.

Important Information for participating in this Webinar.Seriously, read the following and save it for reference: 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial +1 (646) 307-1719 for audio. The access code is: 336-623-352. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 111-626-755

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to our Web page

 

NSTA continues to explore the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) by presenting a web seminar series focusing on the disciplinary core ideas. The fall series features four informative and interactive web seminars on physical science core ideas and three on Earth and space science. The series will continue in 2014 with web seminars on life science and engineering design.

The web seminar on the disciplinary core idea of Earth and Human Activity addresses questions such as “How do humans depend on Earth’s resources?” and “How do humans change the planet?”

This web seminar will provide guidance on:

  • which concepts are central to an understanding of Earth and human activity
  • how students' understanding of Earth and human activity might progress over their K-12 education; and
  • what students engaging in scientific and engineering practices to understand Earth and human activity looks like in the classroom

Why is climate change such a polarizing topic? How can environmental educators address this loaded issue in their communities and programs? This course is for environmental education professionals interested in applying current research in climate change communication and psychology to their educational programs. Students will learn about recent research on climate change psychology and climate change communication and how concepts from these fields can be incorporated into EE programming. For the final assignment, students will incorporate what they have learned in a lesson or action plan for their organization. Alternately, students can write a short reflective essay on climate change education practices in their community or organization based on concepts covered in the course. 

NOTE: This course is not about about climate change science or impacts but rather about effective practices for communicating about climate change through environmental education programs. This course is designed with North American educators in mind, although we are accepting a limited number of international participants. 

Dates: 2016-09-06  to 2016-10-28 

Course Size: Limited to 100 Students

Estimated Workload: 3-4 hours per week

Course Facilitator: Anne Armstrong, Anne Ferguson, Marianne Krasny

This course explores the science of climate change. Students will learn how the climate system works; what factors cause climate to change across different time scales and how those factors interact; how climate has changed in the past; how scientists use models, observations and theory to make predictions about future climate; and the possible consequences of climate change for our planet. The course explores evidence for changes in ocean temperature, sea level and acidity due to global warming. Students will learn how climate change today is different from past climate cycles and how satellites and other technologies are revealing the global signals of a changing climate. Finally, the course looks at the connection between human activity and the current warming trend and considers some of the potential social, economic and environmental consequences of climate change.

 

Authoring Scientists

Ed Mathez, Geologist

Gavin Schmidt, Climatologist
 
Drew Shindell, Climatologist

 

Key Science Concepts

The Sun is the primary source of energy for Earth's climate system. The Earth's energy is in balance, or equilibrium, when Earth emits the same amount of energy as it absorbs.

The climate system is dynamic and has many interrelated components. A change in any one component can influence the equilibrium of the system and result in climate changes.

Climate varies over space and time through both natural and human sources. These forces operate over time periods ranging from years to hundreds of millions or even billions of years and vary widely with location on Earth.

Human activities – particularly the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide since the Industrial Revolution – are affecting the climate system today, leading to warming temperatures globally.

Evidence for variations in past climates is held in ocean and lake sediments, ice cores, corals, tree rings, and other geologic records. Understanding past climate informs us about how the present climate system works and how it might change in the future.

Climate change will have consequences for the Earth system including human society. Climate change research involves extensive observations, theory and modeling. Future climate change scenarios are essential to informing efforts to mitigate and to adapt to the consequences of climate change.

Graduate Credit

This course is approved for graduate credit and continuing education units from leading institutions at an additional cost.

 

 

November 5, 2015 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM EDT

As part of the climate change goal, DOE is planning to host eight Regional Climate Change Impact Webinars as part of the MIE initiative. We are looking to host speakers who will discuss regional efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change impacts as they relate to the President's Climate Action Plan with a particular focus on engaging minority communities. 

Experts will provide findings from the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER), energy job strategies, and the National Climate Impact Assessment. As part of the QER discussion, we plan to share climate-based findings related to national security, resilience, the grid of the future, environment, grid siting, and shared transport. This discussion will outline federal energy policy objectives, proposals, and actions, particularly as they relate to climate change and resilience for underserved communities. For more information on the QER, please visithttp://energy.gov/epsa/quadrennial-energy-review-qer. 

An expert on energy and climate change job strategies will discuss job opportunities by region as well as regional options for renewables and energy efficiency. We will share region-specific information about the energy workforce across a variety of energy sectors and experience levels. 

The final section of the webinar will focus on findings from the National Climate Assessment and their regional applicability to those communities who are disproportionally impacted by the effects of climate change. We hope to host regional experts who can share Assessment findings and provide potential tools for resilience among minority and tribal communities.

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) brings considerably more attention to climate and climate change than earlier curriculum standards. The session will explore what and how to teach climate in ways connected to NGSS's three dimensions: (science and engineering practices, cross-cutting themes, and disciplinary core ideas (DCIs)), especially the most connected DCI: Human Impacts. We welcome abstracts addressing innovative roles for scientists assisting educators, student engagement with real data, materials and approaches that attend to the climate-energy connection; exemplary curricular materials, successful out-of-school programs, and strategies for dealing with anti-science sentiments.

The live streams will begin 15 minutes before the session times. View the full program. Note: All times are in PST.

Monday, August 1 at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

 

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project is proud to welcome Kristen Poppleton, Director of Education at ClimateGeneration: A Will Steger Legacy as the featured speaker this month.

Climate Generation educates and empowers people to engage in solutions to climate change. They implement a model of climate change education that strives to bridge “learning to know” and “learning to do”. In this presentation Kristen will share Climate Generation’s model of professional and curriculum development and free resources for bringing climate change into your educational setting. You don't want to miss this presentation as you gear up to engage your students/audiences in climate change education and action this coming academic year.

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project visit the Web page 

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to the Listserv

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