Monday, March 7th at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project welcomes Dr. T.J. Fudge, Paleoclimate Researcher, University of Washington, and Ms. Louise Huffman, Education Program Manager, US Ice Drilling Program as their featured speakers this month.

What's the latest in Antarctic paleo-climate research? Tune in to learn about the nation's newest ice core expedition...SPICE Core (South Pole Ice Core)! Investigators seeking data from the past 40,000 years are drilling a 1500 meter ice core to study chemical isotopes, tiny particles called aerosols and atmospheric gases trapped in the earth's great southern ice sheet. The goal is to investigate environmental change since the last glacial/inter-glacial transition.

Why was the South Pole targeted? What criteria affect the specific site selection for drilling? What new kinds of technology were required? Dr. T.J. Fudge will answer your questions, and share the latest from his work in the Pole's extreme environment.

Educational resources from the US Ice Drilling Program will be showcased by IDPO’s Education Program Manager, Louise Huffman.

Important Information for participating in this Webinar -
Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
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For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to our Web page

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July 31 to August 1- ONLINE SESSIONS
August 5-6 - SESSIONS at NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Columbia University in New York City 
Graduate Credit Option: University of Michigan-Flint
Climate Change in the Classroom is a professional development event for 8th – 12th grade English, Math, Science and Social Studies teachers. The workshop sponsors, GISS, Columbia University, the Science Museum of Minnesota, University of Michigan-Flint, Real World Matters and Mindblue Productions, invite teachers to explore the science underlying global climate change in today's headlines with researchers on the frontlines of advancing knowledge.  A special focus will be developing climate literacy to evaluate energy solutions for mitigating global climate change.  Guided by education faculty, teachers will pilot a new curriculum - Hot: One World, One Climate. CCIC will involve teachers in a learning experience that will deepen understanding about how students learn science, build strategies for using climate change topics as a context for science and math instruction, and facilitate student learning through problem-solving, inquiry and an engaging role-play simulation.            
Learn More and Apply @

One, 60-minute virtual session - Thursday, April 21
12:00 pm Pacific | 1:00 pm Mountain | 2:00 pm Central | 3:00 pm Eastern

This webinar will demonstrate how soils can be used to broaden students' understanding of the Earth system and human impacts on this system. Kathryn Baldwin is the author of the InTeGrate module Soils, Systems, and Society. Hannah Scherer and Martha Murphy are authors of the InTeGrate module A Growing Concern: Sustaining Soil Resources through Local Decision Making. Drawing from these two InTeGrate modules, the presenters will discuss how soils, soil health and soil sustainability provide unique opportunities for engaging students and developing their systems thinking. Examples from the modules show how local data can be used to elucidate abstract concepts and how systems thinking can be applied to real problems. The webinar will include 30 minutes of presentation and 25 minutes for discussion. Participants are encouraged to both ask questions of the presenters and discuss their own experiences of teaching about soils in the context of Earth systems.

For more information on the series and to learn more about InTeGrate visit:


Presented by: Second Nature in partnership with the American Meteorological Society (AMS)

Join AMS & Second Nature for a webinar aimed at promoting the importance of basic climate science education at Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs).

This webinar will provide an overview of:
• The AMS Climate Studies Diversity Project, its eligibility requirements and application process 
• Previous Diversity Project participants’ experiences, and opportunities for Minority-Serving Institutions
• How to integrate the AMS Climate Studies Diversity Project and the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) for campus sustainability planning 

• James Brey – Director, AMS Education Program 
• Jason Szymanski – Professor of Chemistry & Geosciences, Monroe Community College 
• John Warford– Professor of Geography, Florida Agricultural & Mechanical University 
• Van Du – ACUPCC Program Manager, Second Nature 


Funded by NSF

1:00 PM Pacific | 2:00 PM Mountain | 3:00 PM Central | 4:00 PM Eastern

Implementing the NGSS in Earth and Space Sciences requires a shift in how we teach and think about learning. As Chair of the NGSS Earth and Space Science Writing Team, Dr. Wysession has introduced educators to the NGSS through over 70 talks and workshops. In this webinar, Dr. Wysession will identify best practices for helping educators understand the complex vision of the NGSS, highlight areas of common concern and how those may be addressed, and describe helpful resources for sharing NGSS with educators in your own practice.


Michael Wysession​, Washington University St. Louis

Webinar Organizers:

Susan Sullivan (CIRES, U of Colorado) susan.sullivan at
Aida Awad (Maine East High School, Park Ridge, IL)
Edward Robeck (American Geosciences Institute)
John McDaris (National Association of Geoscience Teachers)

With the NGSS Earth and Space Science Working Group

May 29th, 2014 12:00 to 1:00 PM ET

Climate change in the Great Lakes region and beyond is expected to promote shifts in the ranges and phenology of well-known plant and animal species. These shifts are often a result of changes in the availability of food and shelter, as well as temperature. Knowing more about these potential impacts will help wildlife managers and nature enthusiasts alike to adapt to and potentially mitigate some of the resulting changes in wildlife diversity.

This webinar will cover:

  • an overview of potential climate change impacts on wildlife
  • effects of a changing climate on the phenology of migratory birds
  • impacts of shifting climate conditions (such as drought and flooding) on the vulnerability of species of special concern
  • climate change effects on Broad-tailed Hummingbirds as a result of shifts in the timing of flowering of their nectar flowers glacier lily, dwarf larkspur, and Indian paintbrush, which they rely on during spring migration

The webinar is free. To register click here. Once registered, you will receive a confirmation email with log-in information.



Welcome and Introduction: Jill Jentes Banicki, Ohio Sea Grant

Assessing the Vulnerability of Wildlife to Climate Change: Benjamin Zuckerberg, Dept of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, UW-Madison

Climate Change Effects on Broad-tailed Hummingbirds: Amy Iler, Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Maryland and The Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory

Question/Answer and Wrap Up

Discussion: Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions via a live chat after the presentation.


Visit to view previous webinars and other climate resources.

January session: Thursday, Jan 15th- 4:30-5:45pm ET 

Although 97% of active climate scientists agree that the earth is warming due to human activities, some polls have found that only 44% of American share this view. As an educator, you are likely to encounter people who have received information that conflicts with the accepted climate science, perhaps from sources that they trust. This session will help you better understand American's perceptions of climate change and provide tips for better communicating climate science.

Click here on the day of the event to connect to the Ask US session. (You can access this page about 10 minutes before the start)

This event is a Google Hangout and will be broadcast live on YouTube. Questions may be submitted during the Hangout using the comments section or via Twitter –use  #AskUS

Online Educator Professional Development on Earth System Science Topics from ESTEEM (Earth Systems, Technology and Energy Education for MUREP –Minority University Research and Education Program)


Join us on Monday, April 13th at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

There is increasing recognition of the significance of how Traditional Environmental Knowledge (TEK) can inform our understanding of the impacts of climate change and strategies for adaptation and mitigation. Indigenous people bring a collective knowledge of the land, sky and sea and provide a crucial foundation for community-based adaptation and mitigation. Indigenous knowledge has been long recognized as a key source of information and insight in domains such as forestry, traditional medicine, biodiversity conservation, resource management, impact assessment, and natural disaster preparedness and response. 
NOAA’s Climate Stewards Education Project is honored collaborate with Cultural Specialists from the Smithsonian Museum of the American Indian, Project Indigenous, and Educators from the University of Wisconsin-Extension to present this webinar on TEK, how it can inform our understanding of a changing climate's impacts on coastal and inland Indigenous people, and useful teaching materials to bring these ideas together. 
  • Dennis Zotigh, Kiowa, San Juan Pueblo and Santee Dakota, Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, will provide an opening song. 
  • Scott Frazier, Crow/Santee, Project Indigenous, will discuss climate change impacts on sacred sites/sacred places, and what TEK can offer in adapting to climate change impacts. 
  • Albert “Abby” Ybarra, Yaqui-Tohono O'Odham, Project Indigenous, will present Three Sisters Gardening, an ancient method of farming and how it can be used to connect youth to the earth, annual cycles of growth, and climate change. 
  • Cathy Techmann, University of Wisconsin-Extension, will present G-WOW “Gikinoo’wizhiwe Onji Waaban” (Guiding for Tomorrow), a climate service learning initiative integrating climate change research, TEK, and place-based evidence of climate change impacts on traditional Ojibwe lifeways to provide knowledge about what can be done to mitigate or adapt to a changing climate for people of all culture

Following the webinar, there will be an informal discussion of the topics presented. All attendees are invited to participate. There are limited spaces for this discussion, information on joining will be provided during the event.

Please share this opportunity will all interested colleagues and Networks.

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar

Important Information for participating in this Webinar. Seriously, read the following and save it for reference:

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting at the start time.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting using VOIP, dial +1 (415) 655-0059 for audio. The access code is: 926-695-389. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: The ID Number for this Webinar is: 126-553-435

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to:


Where in the United States would the use of solar panels be most effective? This web seminar features the “Solar Cell Energy Availability From Around the Country” activity from MY NASA DATA. During this seminar you will become familiar with the activity by comparing the monthly averages of surface downward radiation in various locations around the United States and analyzing areas where the population would be more or less conducive to having solar panels. 

Register today!

Date: Saturday, March 12, 2016
10 a.m. – 3 p.m. ET
9 a.m. – 2 p.m. CT
8 a.m. – 1 p.m. MT
7 a.m. – 12 p.m. PT

NSTA, in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), would like to invite you to attend the virtual conference titled: Climate Science in the Classroom. This half-day virtual conference will feature climate scientists and education specialists who will share both their knowledge about climate science as well as classroom-ready resources that educators can use with their students.

View the Conference Agenda

Attend the virtual conference to:

  • Explore the evidence for climate change and its impact
  • Learn about specific climate science awareness tools and strategies you can use in your your classroom
  • Ask questions of climate experts
  • Engage in dialogue with science educators from across the world

All educators registered to the virtual conference will receive access to the conference archives to watch later on demand. A certificate of attendance/participation is available for a modest fee. Please see the registration page for details.