This is the ninth and final lesson in a series of lessons about climate change. This lesson focuses on the various activities that humans can do to mitigate the effects of climate change. This includes information on current and predicted CO2 emission scenarios across the globe, alternative energy sources, and how people are currently responding to climate change. Importantly, this lesson is motivating in showing students that they can make a difference.

Climate Change 2014: Mitigation of Climate Change

On April 15 in Berlin, Germany, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change approved and released Working Group III's Fifth Assessment Report - a comprehensive assessment of all relevant options for mitigating climate change through limiting or preventing greenhouse gas emissions, as well as activities that remove them from the atmosphere.

The American Planning Association's 2014 National Planning Conference will be held in Atlanta from April 26-30.

The California Adaptation Forum aims to create a network of adaptation leaders committed to addressing climate risks in California.

This interactive conference will be geared towards networking and exchange among stakeholders and decision makers throughout the Carolina region.

Switch to Natural Gas Power Plants Reduces Carbon Dioxide Emissions

Power plants that use natural gas release far less of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide than coal-fired power plants, according to a new study from CIRES and NOAA scientists.

This conference will focus on the science, impacts, planning, and response to climate change along the East Coast.

This short series of lessons has multiple facets that may require several class periods to implement. Lessons explore the importance of engineering solutions to the management of climate change, by brainstorming ways to remove CO2 from the atmosphere and store it in a form that does not promote global warming. Students can explore engineering careers and experience learning through the scientific process.

Sensitivity Study Helps Salt Lake City Plan for the Future

A new study published in the journal Earth Interactions has found that rising temperatures challenge Salt Lake City’s water supply. The research shows that every degree Fahrenheit of warming in the Salt Lake City region could mean a 1.8 to 6.5 percent drop in the annual flow of streams that provide water to the city. The sensitivity study aimed to help the city, and others in the Intermountain West, plan for the future.

This free webinar will examine the interplay between climate mitigation and adaptation, including the energy-water nexus.

Pages