This Flash-based simulation explores the relationship between carbon emissions and atmospheric carbon dioxide using two main displays: (1) graphs that show the level of human-generated CO2 emissions, CO2 removals, and the level of CO2 in the atmosphere, and (2) a bathtub animation that shows the same information as the graphs. The bathtub simulation illustrates the challenges of reducing greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere.

This is the ninth and final lesson in a series of lessons about climate change. This lesson focuses on the various activities that humans can do to mitigate the effects of climate change. This includes information on current and predicted CO2 emission scenarios across the globe, alternative energy sources, and how people are currently responding to climate change. Importantly, this lesson is motivating in showing students that they can make a difference.

This video clip highlights the effort on by a group of young students to ban the use of plastic shopping bag in the city of Santa Monica. The video documents the effort and provides visual testimony of the effects that trash and specifically plastic bags have on the ocean ecosystem.

This set of six interactive slides showcases how a typical photovoltaic cell converts solar energy into electricity. Explore the components of a photovoltaic cell, including the silicon layers, metal backing, antireflective coating, and metal conductor strips. Using animations, investigate why the silicon layers are doped with phosphorous and boron, and how an electric field is used to generate electricity from sunlight.

This video addresses acidification of the ocean and the ecological and economic implications of the resulting pH change on marine life. It includes information about how ocean acidification resulting from increased absorption of CO2 from the atmosphere is affecting ocean species such as sea urchins and oysters. Scientists from the University of California at Santa Barbara discuss their experiments with sea creatures in acidic sea water. There is an associated lesson plan and classroom activity that has students test the effects of CO2 on water pH.

This graphic contains ocean heat content (OHC) anomaly trends from 1945 to 2009 for the top 700 meters of the ocean. It is composed of long-term datasets from seven different references. The graphic can be manipulated and downloaded as a picture.

NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project (CSEP) is collaborating with Federal, State and NGO partners to convene four climate-science workshops for formal and informal educators. Participants will hear from and interact with climate science, education and communication experts, and visit research facilities to explore foundational technologies and innovations in Earth-system research. This workshop in St. Petersburg Florida will focus on the region and topical impacts of climate change, with a goal of connecting educators and their students/audiences to the best-available, science-based information and resources about climate change.

Registration for the St. Petersburg Florida workshop is open, however there are attendance limits for the workshop, and we are advertising them nationally.  Availability will be on a first come first serve basis, so register early for your workshop. Participation in the workshops is free, but attendees are responsible for arranging their own transportation, lodging and meals unless otherwise indicated in workshop details.  

All attendees will receive a certificate acknowledging their participation in the workshop as well as the number of professional development hours they have engaged in.  

Below are the location, dates, locations, and attendance limits for the upcoming workshop. Registration forms will be shut down when registration for that workshop has reached capacity. You will receive an email confirming your participation in the workshop. The capacity for this workshop is 50 Participants.

Climate Education Workshop Detailed Information

St. Petersburg, Florida

Dates & Times: Sunday and Monday, May 17th and 18th, 2015. 8:00am - 5:00pm

 

Place: Sirata Beach Resort & Conference Center 5300 Gulf Blvd, St. Pete Beach, FL 33706 (855) 344-5999 http://www.sirata.com

This workshop will precede a Sea Grant-supported Climate Community of Practice (CCOP) Annual Meeting in the same location. Information on both the CCOP annual meeting and the climate education workshop can be at: http://masgc.org/climate-outreach-community-of-practice/annual-meeting-2015.

 

Primary Contacts:  

Amy Clark, Amy.Clark@noaa.gov

Molly Harrison, Molly.Harrison@noaa.gov

Bruce Moravchik, Bruce.moravchik@noaa.gov

 

Featured Presentations:

  • Paleoclimatology, Paleoceanography, Human Impact on Climate Cycles and Tools for Teaching it
  • Impacts of Climate Change on Human and Biological Ecosystems
  • Impact of Climate Change on Manatees and Their Habitats
  • Palynological Research, What it is, How Its Used to Understanding Climate Change, and Tools for Teaching it
  • Lessons Learned: Best Practices for Teaching Climate Change

 

Featured Activities:

  • Develop your climate change “Elevator Speech” for connecting to climate skeptics
  • See demonstrations of how scientists and educators have made climate data and research findings available and relevant to the education community (included a visit from two of Busch Gardens Tampa’s Ambassador Animals)
  • Activities to increase participant climate science knowledge
  • Participate in demonstrations on how to teaching climate change and related topics.
  • Field Trip to Eckerd College - See how a local college implements student run stewardship programs related to climate education and resilience. Including: composting, recycling, community gardening, invasive removal, and a bike share programs. 

 

Notes on Food & Lodging:

  • There is no cost to attend this workshop.
  • Participants must make their own travel and overnight arrangements.
  • Meals will not be provided, but there are numerous dining options nearby.
  • A limited block of rooms have been reserved at the Federal Government Rate ($104/night excluding taxes) at the Sirata Beach Resort & Conference Center. To reserve a room at this rate, call the Sirata at 1-800-344-5999 by Thursday, April 30 and identify yourself as booking a room as part of the “NOAA Education Workshop Group” No rooms will be held at this rate past this date. 

For questions concerning the workshop including location and program questions, contact the workshop lead: Amy Clark, Amy.Clark@noaa.gov

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This workshop is part of the White House Climate Education and Literacy Initiative

 

Learn to teach basic climate science and empower your students to take action. Practice teaching the carbon cycle, investigate "garbology," and develop simple student action projects. Content is focused on grades five to eight.

Location: Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, CA

 
Wednesday, April 30th, 2014 2pm ET/11am PT
 
How will climate change affect our communities? How can we evaluate news stories about the effects of climate change in your area? What can you do to reach out to your local media and educators, to encourage them to explore the local impacts of climate change? 

The National Climate Assessment can help. 

This report from the US government—due the week of May 6th—evaluates, integrates and assesses observed and projected impacts of climate change across the country, examining how climate change will affect different communities and regions. It will be a tremendous resource for teachers, for parents, and for anyone trying to connect global climate change to local concerns 

To learn how we can make the best use of this tool, join us for a discussion with a panel of climate change specialists. These specialists will address how you can use the report to learn how climate change is already affecting your community, and how teachers can use the report to bring climate change into classrooms. 

Panelists will include: Emily Cloyd, Public Participation and Engagement Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment at USGCRP, the federal agency developing the National Climate Assessment; Paige Knappenberger, media relations associate at Climate Nexus, who tracks media coverage and helps communities connect with media outlets to address climate change; Amanda Rycerz, research officer at Habitat 7, website developers of for NCA. Moderator Minda Berbeco is a Programs and Policy Director at NCSE specializing in climate change, working with parents and educators to support the good teaching of climate change science in public schools.

 

NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project (CSEP) is collaborating with Federal, State and NGO partners to convene four climate-science workshops for formal and informal educators. Participants will hear from and interact with climate science, education and communication experts, and visit research facilities to explore foundational technologies and innovations in Earth-system research. This workshop in Seattle, Washington will focus on the region and topical impacts of climate change, with a goal of connecting educators and their students/audiences to the best-available, science-based information and resources about climate change.

Registration for the Seattle, Washington workshop is open, however there are attendance limits for the workshop, and we are advertising them nationally.  Availability will be on a first come first serve basis, so register early for your workshop. Participation in the workshops is free, but attendees are responsible for arranging their own transportation, lodging and meals unless otherwise indicated in workshop details.  

All attendees will receive a certificate acknowledging their participation in the workshop as well as the number of professional development hours they have engaged in.  

Below are the location, dates, locations, and attendance limits for the upcoming workshop. Registration forms will be shut down when registration for that workshop has reached capacity. You will receive an email confirming your participation in the workshop. The capacity for this workshop is 40 Participants.

Important Note: If you are a foreign national and wish to attend the workshops in Seattle, WA you MUST send an email to the lead contact for that workshop: Lisa Hiruki-Raring, Lisa.Hiruki-Raring@noaa.gov

 

Climate Education Workshop Detailed Information

Seattle, Washington

Dates & Times: Thursday and Friday, April 23rd and 24th, 2015. 8:30am - 5:00pm

 

Place: NOAA Western Regional Center, Building 9

7600 Sand Point Way NE

Seattle, WA 98115

 

Important Note: If you are a foreign national and wish to attend this workshop, you MUST note it in your registration and send an email to: Lisa Hiruki-Raring, Lisa.Hiruki-Raring@noaa.gov

 

Contacts:  

Lisa Hiruki-Raring, Lisa.Hiruki-Raring@noaa.gov

Peg Steffen, Peg.Steffen@noaa.gov

Molly Harrison, Molly.Harrison@noaa.gov

 

Featured Presentations

  • Ocean Acidification - What We Know & How We Know It. 
  • The Past and Present Climate of the Pacific Northwest.
  • Climate Change Impacts on Ice-Associated Seals in Alaska 
  • Ways to Engage Audiences and Inspire Local Action to Address Ocean Acidification. 
  • Pacific Northwest Climate Change: Impacts and Implications. 
  • Western Water Resources, Climate, and Science. 
  • Salmon Flexibility Put to the Test by Climate Change. 

 

Featured Activities 

  • Fisheries and Ocean Acidification
  • Polar Detectives
  • Climate Change Impacts on Ice-Associated Seals.
  • Tours:

    • NOAA’s National Weather Service Forecast Office
    • NOAA’s Marine Mammal Research Bone Collection
    • NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory’s Engineering Department

 

Notes - Workshop Costs, Food & Lodging:

  • There is no cost to attend this workshop.
  • Participants must make their own travel and overnight arrangements.
  • A nearby lodging option is The Silver Cloud Inn - University District (http://www.silvercloud.com/university/) 5036 25 Avenue NE, Seattle, WA 98105. Ph: 206.526.5200, 800.205.6940. If there are enough workshop participants staying at this hotel, there may be an option for free shuttle service to/from the NOAA Sand Point Campus.
  • Meals will not be provided, but there is an easily accessible cafeteria as well as vending machines on the NOAA Campus where the workshop will be held.

 

For questions concerning the workshop including location and program questions, contact the workshop lead: Lisa Hiruki-Raring, Lisa.Hiruki-Raring@noaa.gov

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This workshop is part of the White House Climate Education and Literacy Initiative

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