Students conduct a greenhouse gas emission inventory for their college or university as a required part of the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment.

NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project (CSEP) is collaborating with Federal, State and NGO partners to convene four climate-science workshops for formal and informal educators. Participants will hear from and interact with climate science, education and communication experts, and visit research facilities to explore foundational technologies and innovations in Earth-system research. This workshop in Seattle, Washington will focus on the region and topical impacts of climate change, with a goal of connecting educators and their students/audiences to the best-available, science-based information and resources about climate change.

Registration for the Seattle, Washington workshop is open, however there are attendance limits for the workshop, and we are advertising them nationally.  Availability will be on a first come first serve basis, so register early for your workshop. Participation in the workshops is free, but attendees are responsible for arranging their own transportation, lodging and meals unless otherwise indicated in workshop details.  

All attendees will receive a certificate acknowledging their participation in the workshop as well as the number of professional development hours they have engaged in.  

Below are the location, dates, locations, and attendance limits for the upcoming workshop. Registration forms will be shut down when registration for that workshop has reached capacity. You will receive an email confirming your participation in the workshop. The capacity for this workshop is 40 Participants.

Important Note: If you are a foreign national and wish to attend the workshops in Seattle, WA you MUST send an email to the lead contact for that workshop: Lisa Hiruki-Raring, Lisa.Hiruki-Raring@noaa.gov

 

Climate Education Workshop Detailed Information

Seattle, Washington

Dates & Times: Thursday and Friday, April 23rd and 24th, 2015. 8:30am - 5:00pm

 

Place: NOAA Western Regional Center, Building 9

7600 Sand Point Way NE

Seattle, WA 98115

 

Important Note: If you are a foreign national and wish to attend this workshop, you MUST note it in your registration and send an email to: Lisa Hiruki-Raring, Lisa.Hiruki-Raring@noaa.gov

 

Contacts:  

Lisa Hiruki-Raring, Lisa.Hiruki-Raring@noaa.gov

Peg Steffen, Peg.Steffen@noaa.gov

Molly Harrison, Molly.Harrison@noaa.gov

 

Featured Presentations

  • Ocean Acidification - What We Know & How We Know It. 
  • The Past and Present Climate of the Pacific Northwest.
  • Climate Change Impacts on Ice-Associated Seals in Alaska 
  • Ways to Engage Audiences and Inspire Local Action to Address Ocean Acidification. 
  • Pacific Northwest Climate Change: Impacts and Implications. 
  • Western Water Resources, Climate, and Science. 
  • Salmon Flexibility Put to the Test by Climate Change. 

 

Featured Activities 

  • Fisheries and Ocean Acidification
  • Polar Detectives
  • Climate Change Impacts on Ice-Associated Seals.
  • Tours:

    • NOAA’s National Weather Service Forecast Office
    • NOAA’s Marine Mammal Research Bone Collection
    • NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory’s Engineering Department

 

Notes - Workshop Costs, Food & Lodging:

  • There is no cost to attend this workshop.
  • Participants must make their own travel and overnight arrangements.
  • A nearby lodging option is The Silver Cloud Inn - University District (http://www.silvercloud.com/university/) 5036 25 Avenue NE, Seattle, WA 98105. Ph: 206.526.5200, 800.205.6940. If there are enough workshop participants staying at this hotel, there may be an option for free shuttle service to/from the NOAA Sand Point Campus.
  • Meals will not be provided, but there is an easily accessible cafeteria as well as vending machines on the NOAA Campus where the workshop will be held.

 

For questions concerning the workshop including location and program questions, contact the workshop lead: Lisa Hiruki-Raring, Lisa.Hiruki-Raring@noaa.gov

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This workshop is part of the White House Climate Education and Literacy Initiative

​Monday, May 2nd at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

Have you ever wondered what would be the best way to talk about climate change? Have you felt unsure if your message is clear and connects to your students or audiences? If so, then this webinar is for you! Effectively communicating complex issues involves sound science and an element of artistry. The FrameWorks Institute interviewed over 18,000 Americans and conducted multiple experiments on the topic of communicating climate chanage to identify the “frames” or messaging strategies, which are most likely to help the public understand that:

  • fossil fuels are the primary cause of climate change
  • our ocean is part of the climate change story
  • we need alternative energy solutions at the community-based level
  • these are all issues that we can and should tackle

 

Find out how you can use these simple, clear, and effective messages to communicate climate change in your classroom and beyond!

Important Information for participating in this Webinar

Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.

  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial 1-(415)-655-0060 for audio. The access code is: 522-086-880. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 144-217-139

 

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to their Web page 

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to the Climate Stewards Listserv

The opportunities and pathways for careers in natural resources and sustainability areas are diverse and the conversation between employers and higher education is only just beginning. This workshop will focus on articulating the breadth of opportunities and identifying the knowledge and skills that are pathways to different types of employment.

Application Deadline: February 22, 2013

Join us on Monday, April 13th at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

There is increasing recognition of the significance of how Traditional Environmental Knowledge (TEK) can inform our understanding of the impacts of climate change and strategies for adaptation and mitigation. Indigenous people bring a collective knowledge of the land, sky and sea and provide a crucial foundation for community-based adaptation and mitigation. Indigenous knowledge has been long recognized as a key source of information and insight in domains such as forestry, traditional medicine, biodiversity conservation, resource management, impact assessment, and natural disaster preparedness and response. 
 
NOAA’s Climate Stewards Education Project is honored collaborate with Cultural Specialists from the Smithsonian Museum of the American Indian, Project Indigenous, and Educators from the University of Wisconsin-Extension to present this webinar on TEK, how it can inform our understanding of a changing climate's impacts on coastal and inland Indigenous people, and useful teaching materials to bring these ideas together. 
  • Dennis Zotigh, Kiowa, San Juan Pueblo and Santee Dakota, Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, will provide an opening song. 
  • Scott Frazier, Crow/Santee, Project Indigenous, will discuss climate change impacts on sacred sites/sacred places, and what TEK can offer in adapting to climate change impacts. 
  • Albert “Abby” Ybarra, Yaqui-Tohono O'Odham, Project Indigenous, will present Three Sisters Gardening, an ancient method of farming and how it can be used to connect youth to the earth, annual cycles of growth, and climate change. 
  • Cathy Techmann, University of Wisconsin-Extension, will present G-WOW “Gikinoo’wizhiwe Onji Waaban” (Guiding for Tomorrow), a climate service learning initiative integrating climate change research, TEK, and place-based evidence of climate change impacts on traditional Ojibwe lifeways to provide knowledge about what can be done to mitigate or adapt to a changing climate for people of all culture

Following the webinar, there will be an informal discussion of the topics presented. All attendees are invited to participate. There are limited spaces for this discussion, information on joining will be provided during the event.

Please share this opportunity will all interested colleagues and Networks.

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar

Important Information for participating in this Webinar. Seriously, read the following and save it for reference:

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting at the start time.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting using VOIP, dial +1 (415) 655-0059 for audio. The access code is: 926-695-389. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 126-553-435

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

 

11:00 am Pacific | 12:00 pm Mountain | 1:00 pm Central | 2:00 pm Eastern

Presenters: Diane Doser (The University of Texas at El Paso), Joshua Villalobos (El Paso Community College), Stefany Sit (University of Illinois at Chicago), Sue Ebanks (Savannah State University)

This webinar is part of a series supporting teaching with InTeGrate principles, using InTeGrate-developed and curated materials as tools.

Summary

This webinar will provide an opportunity to hear from faculty who are working with diverse students to broaden the distribution of geoscience and environmental science knowledge and awareness at the undergraduate level. Diane Doser and Joshua Villalobos are leaders of the El Paso Higher Education Community InTeGrate Implementation Program, and will discuss the role of building local relevance using societal issues and the effectiveness of using diverse pedagogical approaches in teaching to a minority group. Sue Ebanks is the leader of the Savannah State University InTeGrate Implementation Program. Sue will discuss how to facilitate interaction between science and non-science students and how to increase awareness of locally relevant environmental issues among minority groups. Stefany Sit is the leader of the University of Illinois at Chicago InTeGrate Implementation Program. She will discuss how focusing on career paths can be used as an awareness, motivation, and recruitment tool when working with urban students. The webinar will include 40 minutes of presentations and 20 minutes for questions and discussion. Participants are encouraged to both ask questions of the presenters and discuss their own experiences on the topic. 

Goals:

At the end of this webinar, participants will have

  • motivation to recruit and support students who are underrepresented in geoscience and related fields
  • examples of strategies to engage students through societally relevant topics, concepts that cross disciplines, and connections to careers
  • greater familiarity with InTeGrate principles and resources
  • new colleagues engaged in this work

 

For more information on the series and to learn more about InTeGrate visit: http://serc.carleton.edu/integrate/workshops/index.html

Consider joining MADE-CLEAR on a five-day professional development experience on climate change and its solutions led by experts in climate science and educational researchers. You will explore the science of climate change through activities, inquiry, and small group work on curriculum.  The Academy will be held at the University of Delaware’s Virden Center.

 

On April 22, 2015 please join us for a live webinar showcasing The Wild Center’s Youth Climate Summit — designed by and for high school students. The Association of Science-Technology Centers (ASTC) and The Wild Center have teamed up to share a successful Youth Climate Summit format designed to engage high school students in climate literacy through meaningful dialogue and action planning on climate change. We will highlight this program through a two-hour webinar that will provide an overview of the Youth Climate Summit concept, impacts and outcomes for schools and students, and the planning resources available for free through our Youth Climate Summit Toolkit. Project Director Jen Kretser along with two summit students — Erin Weaver and Meadow Hackett — will be sharing their experiences.

Encouraged by US government leaders and interest by other science centers, our collective goal is to share this convening program format at no cost and support the development of at least 10 Youth Climate Summits across the international science museum community in 2015. We will offer all the organizational tools you will need along with connections to scientific experts in your region.

Climate literacy education continues to be an urgent issue and this program format allows for informal science institutions such as science centers, zoos, aquariums, and non-profits to join in the international effort. Youth Climate Summits have been found to be powerful vehicles for inspiration, learning, community engagement, and youth leadership development. Climate literacy with a focus on local climate impacts and solutions is a key component of the Youth Climate Summit. The project-based learning surrounding the creation of a unique, student driven, sustainability and Climate Action Plan promotes leadership skills applicable to and the tools necessary for a 21st Century workforce. This effort was highlighted as a commitment in support of theWhite House Office of Science & Technology Policy’s Climate Education and Literacy Initiative, with the goal of connecting American students and citizens with the best-available, science-based information about climate change. The meeting is being hosted by the Department of Energy office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy as part of their efforts to support Climate and Energy Literacy.

The Youth Climate Summit Toolkit can be accessed here.

This short video provides an overview of the Adirondack Youth Climate Summit.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE:

Wednesday, April 22
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET
Youth Climate Summit

Please join the webinar from your computer, tablet, or smartphone here:https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/327254349

You can also dial in using your phone:
   United States – +1 (872) 240-3312
   Access Code: 327-254-349

For anyone in the Washington DC area, we invite you to attend in person at the US Department of Energy. Please RSVP to:
Joshua Sneideman, Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow
Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
202-586-5695
joshua.sneideman@ee.doe.gov

In this hour-long webinar, a NASA scientist will share the current state of the 2015-2016 El Niño event, and will discuss whether this El Niño matched the predictions for how global weather patterns would be impacted. Participants will also learn how to use the GLOBE data visualization tools to compare and contrast the El Niño Student field campaign variables from schools around the world.

What determines a planet's climate? In this web seminar, you will use NASA mission data collected from NASA satellites to show how we determine a planet’s climate. The featured lesson in this web seminar is Modeling Hot and Cold Planets from the Earth Climate Course. Students explore why extreme temperature differences exist between Earth and other planets in our solar system.

Register today!

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