This is a polar map of permafrost extent in the Northern Hemisphere. A sidebar explains how permafrost, as it forms and later thaws, serves as both a sink and source for carbon to the atmosphere. Related multimedia is a slideshow of permafrost scientists from U. of Alaska, Fairbanks, collecting permafrost data in the field.

This video and accompanying essay examine carbon capture and storage and clean-coal technology, providing statistics for overall annual U.S. consumption as well as average household usage. Turning solid coal into a clean-burning fuel gas (syngas) and capture and storage pros and cons are discussed.

This video shows 15 years of data obtained via Polar-orbiting satellites that are able to detect subtle differences in ocean color, allowing scientists to see where there are higher concentrations of phytoplankton - a proxy for the concentration of chlorophyll in the ocean.

In this video clip from Earth: The Operators' Manual, host Richard Alley discusses China's efforts to develop clean energy technologies and to reduce CO2 in the atmosphere, by building coal plants using CO2 sequestration technology. (scroll down page for video)

This web page from the National Snow and Ice Data Center contains two related visualizations. The first visualization gives an estimate of the percent contribution to sea level change since the 1990s from three contributors - small glaciers and ice caps, the Greenland Ice Sheet and the Antarctic Ice Sheet. The second visualization shows the cumulative contribution to sea level from small glaciers and ice caps plotted with the annual global surface air temperature anomaly.

This is a multi-media teaching tool to learn about climate change. The tool is comprised of stills, video clips, graphic representations, and explanatory text about climate science. Acclaimed photographer James Balog and his Extreme Ice team put this teaching tool together.

This is a photo essay linked to a New York Times story about climate-related stressors on forests -- including mountain pine beetles, forest fires, forest clearance, and ice storms -- and the importance of protecting forests as an important carbon sink.

This straightforward calculator provides conversions from one unit of energy to the equivalent amount of CO2 emission expected from using that amount.

7:00pm ET/4:00pm PT

Scientists from two NASA Earth science missions will address how their synergistic research helps us to understand Earth’s water cycle, including extreme events such as floods. This presentation will use an online concept map tool for exploring the water cycle. Unlike traditional slide-based presentations, these dynamic maps act as a resource that can be explored with an audience, instead of a one-way, linear presentation. The concept maps presented are loaded with educational assets – including images, videos, news items – that webinar participants can use in their own educational practices, presentations or for their own learning. The concept maps and other materials presented are freely available online, and instructions will be provided to give participants access to the maps after the webinars. Participants will also learn how to create their own maps.


Jorge Vazquez, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
J.T. Reager, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Annette deCharon, University of Maine
Carla Companion, University of Maine

About the Presenters:

JT Reager is a research scientist in the Water and Carbon cycles group at Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He received Bachelors degrees in Aerospace Engineering and Ocean Engineering from Virginia Tech, a masters degree in Physical Oceanography from the University of Delaware, and a Ph.D in Earth System Science from the University of California, Irvine. He is currently using gravity-based observations of water movement across the planet from NASA’s GRACE mission to study flood and drought occurence and to measure the strength of the global water cycle. He’s interested in modeling and remote sensing of the Earth system, and implications for society and natural resources management.

Jorge Vazquez is the NASA Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) scientist supporting Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Surface Salinity. He received his Bachelor of Science in Physics from the University of Miami, his masters degree in Oceanography from the university of Rhode Island and his Ph.D in geological sciences from the University of Southern California. He currently serves as the chair of the Applications and User Services Technical Advisory Group for the Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST). His research interests include applying high resolution SST data to understand better coastal dynamics. Outside interests include biking, hiking and tennis as well as serving the community through his Rotary Club.

Annette deCharon has leveraged her background in earth and ocean sciences into extensive experience in designing, implementing and maintaining online tools and content. She and her team currently manage the NASA Aquarius, Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (, and COSEE Ocean Systems websites. They have also conducted 56 webinars using their own concept-mapping software, which was developed to bridge ocean resources with effective education practice. These webinars have reached 2112 people in 48 U.S. states/territories and 28 non-U.S. countries.

Carla Companion is a research associate at the University of Maine (Umaine) working on many different grant-funded projects – including work with the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE) Ocean Systems, NASA Aquarius and SPURS missions, and the Ocean Observatories Initiative. Prior to joining the UMaine School of Marine Sciences, she earned her MS in Environmental Studies/Environmental Education from Antioch University New England and her B.S. in Marine and Freshwater Biology from the University of New Hampshire. In addition to helping run Scientist-Educator Collaborative workshops and other projects, she has helps to facilitate webinars featuring ocean scientists and to inform development of concept mapping ​software.

In this web seminar we will explore the use of computer models for generating projections about the future of Earth's climate. The presenters will demonstrate the Very, Very Simple Climate Model—free educational software that enables students to try out "what if" scenarios about changes to our planet's climate during the coming century. Participating educators will learn about the scientific basis of this simple model, derived from observations (ice core data) of past climates during recent ice ages.

Register today!

Presenters: Scott Denning and Randy Russell