In this activity about climate change on the Antarctic Peninsula, learners investigate environmental changes in the living and nonliving resources of Antarctic peninsula and the impact of these changes on AdÃlie penguin communities. The activity stresses the importance of evidence in the formulation of scientific explanations.

This visualization is a utility-scale, land-based, 80-meter wind map. It states, utilities, and wind energy developers use to locate and quantify the wind resource, identifying potentially windy sites within a fairly large region and determining a potential site's economic and technical viability.

This is an interactive graph that involves records of ice cover in two Wisconsin lakes - Lake Mendota and Lake Monona - from 1855-2010.

In this activity, students conduct a life cycle assessment of energy used and produced in ethanol production, and a life cycle assessment of carbon dioxide used and produced in ethanol production.

In this activity, students gain experience using a spreadsheet and working with others to decide how to conduct their model 'experiments' with the NASA GEEBITT (Global Equilibrium Energy Balance Interactive Tinker Toy). While becoming more familiar with the physical processes that made Earth's early climate so different from that of today, they also acquire first-hand experience with a limitation in modeling, specifically, parameterization of critical processes.

Sankey (or Spaghetti) diagrams parse out the energy flow by state, based on 2008 data from the Dept. of Energy. These diagrams can help bring a local perspective to energy consumption. The estimates include rejected or lost energy but don't necessarily include losses at the ultimate user end that are due to lack of insulation.

This visualization graphically displays temperature and CO2 concentration in the atmosphere as derived from ice core data from 400,000 years ago to 1950. The data originates from UNEP GRID Arendal's graphic library of CO2 levels from Vostok ice core.

This activity engages learners in exploring the impact of climate change on arctic sea ice in the Bering Sea. They graph and analyze sea ice extent data, conduct a lab on thermal expansion of water, and then observe how a scientist collects long-term data on a bird population.

Monday, May 5, 2014 at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

The main presentation this month will be given by Jerry Meehl, a senior scientist in the University Center for Atmospheric Research's (UCAR) Climate and Global Dynamics Division. Jerry  will talk about the processes involved in producing the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report as well as the National Climate Assessment (NCA).
  
A second presentation will be given by Mindy Berbeco, the Programs and Policy Director at the National Center for Science Education will further discuss the NCA, NCAnet - A group of organizations working with the National Climate Assessment to engage producers and users of climate science and impacts information across the United States, and their efforts to involve educators in unpacking the teachable moments from the report, and how you can become involved and have an impact on a nation-wide scale.

 

Education and communication are among the most powerful tools the nation has to bring hidden hazards to public attention, understanding, and action.

Informing an Effective Response to Climate Change, NRC (2010)

Bumble bees, extreme weather events, sea ice loss, and drought. The impacts of climate change are being felt by communities and creatures across our nation—and world. The Forum on Digital Media for STEM Learning: Climate Education will explore how the stories and science behind these impacts are increasingly being integrated into classroom instruction and STEM education contexts, with a focus on digital media. Held at WGBH’s Brighton studio on Monday, November 9, 2015, this highly-interactive and fast-paced event will examine emerging narratives in climate education, digital media tools and products that show unique potential for educational settings, and promising modes of engagement for students, teachers and schools.

 

Please explore the program and line-up of presenters. Click here to find out how to watch the Forum live.

LIVE STREAM timing for each strand:
 
9:15  - 11 AM ET Strand 1: Standards and Storylines 
 
11:30 AM – 1:15 PM ET Strand 2: Emerging Platforms and Products 
 
2 – 3 PM ET Strand 3: New Modes of Engagement
 

A note about the Program Design of the Forum event:

This Forum event is designed for both live, in-person audiences, as well as viewers who wish to watch and interact via online streaming and social media. The three topic strands have been developed around the content, technology and pedagogy of Climate Education, and reference the TPCK model for professional learning. Strands provide a blend of theory and practice, with anchoring keynote presentations that are followed by shorter “case study” presentations that offer early findings and emergent research. Each strand concludes with a hosted panel discussion with in-studio and online audiences.

These strands are followed by an attendee-driven “unconference,” where participants discuss and develop ways to implement some of the ideas from the panels that had resonated with them. Attendees of the 2014 Forum event reported that the “unconference” session, and additional networking opportunities, provide a real “value-add” for in-person attendance. A dedicated online community space containing tools and resources will continue to be accessible along with the work products from the Forum events, laying the foundation for a larger community of practice for sharing best practices and lessons learned.

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