Thursday, May 5, from 6:30 to 8:00 pm Eastern time to learn about weather and the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission.

Types of weather, weather basics, extreme weather, monitoring extreme weather with satellites, and hands on investigations for students to collect data about weather- including GLOBE protocols, are topics that will be covered during this seminar. The presenters will also talk about the difference between weather and climate and will describe ground validation campaigns.

The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is an international satellite mission (NASA and JAXA) to provide next-generation observations of rain and snow. The GPM mission will help advance our understanding of Earth's water and energy cycles, improve the forecasting of extreme events that cause natural disasters, and extend current capabilities of using satellite precipitation information to directly benefit society. 

All participants will receive a certificate of participation and 100 Learning Center activity points for attending and completing the post-program evaluation. An archive and presentation slides will be available at the end of the program. 

Please visit the main web page of this program to see the description and find links to the biographical information about the presenter(s).

Grades: Elemntary, Middle and High

Vicki Arthur will lead participants through a wide range of education resources from the U.S. Forest Service for teaching about climate change. Forest Service researchers have been observing and studying the effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems for over 30 years. Learn how your students can collect and enter tree data to quantify and put a dollar value on the services that your school yard trees provide.  Discover an interactive atlas where students can learn about computer modeling while observing the potential effects of different emissions scenarios on the ranges of birds and trees. 

Monday, May 18, at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

The peoples, lands, and resources of indigenous communities in the United States, including Alaska and the Pacific Rim, face an array of challenges, many of which are exacerbated by climate change impacts. As one of the most marginalized demographics, the consequences of observed and projected climate change are already dramatically impacting Indigenous ways of life that have persisted for thousands of years. Both the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the Third National Climate Assessment acknowledge that the greatest opportunities for mitigating and adapting to climate impacts must include indigenous knowledge and perspectives.

This webinar will focus on the key findings from the Third National Climate Assessment emphasising findings from the chapter on Indigenous Peoples, Lands and Resources. Presentations will include discussions on access to traditional food, decreases in water quality and quantity and sea ice, and relocation of Native communities brought on by changing climate conditions.

Our Featured Presenters will include:

Following the webinar, there will be an informal discussion of the topics presented. All attendees are invited to participate. There are limited spaces for this discussion, information on joining will be provided during the event.

Please share this opportunity will all interested colleagues and Networks.

 
Important Information for participating in this Webinar. 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting at the start time.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting using VOIP, dial +1 (415) 655-0059 for audio. The access code is: 539-911-382. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to:http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 110-978-691

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

 

Please join us on Tuesday, September 1st at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project is pleased to present Lyndsey Manzo and Barbara Ikalainen for our September, 2015 webinar. Lyndsey and Barbara will discuss how they developed walking tours integrating innovative signage and mobile handheld technologies to teach students, educators and members of the public more about their local environments and the impacts of climate change. 

Lyndsey will present "The Climate Walk" - part of the Ohio State University’s Stone Laboratory student field trip program on Gibraltar Island in the western basin of Lake Erie – which consists of eight strategically placed stations that align with the Essential Principles of Climate Literacy and are accompanied by hands-on approaches to learning about climate change. This interactive place-based journey allows students to explore the impacts of climate change on their local environment, and provides educators with the ability to provide "on the fly" customized content in engaging formats. The Climate Walk is a model that can be replicated and used by formal and informal science educators in regions across the US. 

Barbara will present the process and outcomes of her NOAA Climate Stewards Grant "The North Shore Climate Awareness Project - Why Trees Matter". Barbara created an interactive walking tour of the 10 most interesting tree species on her college campus, posting signs and QR codes on trees allowing students, faculty and the public to instantly access detailed descriptions of that tree species, their carbon sequestration capabilities, and how they will be impacted by climate change in that region.
 

Please share this opportunity will ALL interested colleagues and networks.

 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar. Seriously, read the following and save it for reference: 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial +1 (562) 247-8321 for audio. The access code is: 597-874-782. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 120-411-787

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

 

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to our Listserv at: 

https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/noaaclimatestewards/

Monday, June 6 at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

The Climate Stories Project (CSP) is an educational and artistic forum for sharing stories about personal and community responses to climate change. Through CSP workshops students learn how to engage with climate change through people’s stories, rather than just through the lens of science. In the workshops, students prepare, carry out, and record interviews with local and remote interviewees about their diverse responses to climate change. Students learn to speak with each other about climate change, develop interviewing and editing skills, and create and share original digital storytelling projects. In this presentation you'll learn about the background, goals, methods, and structure of CSP education workshops, and how to integrate them into your existing curriculum. To find out more about CSP, visit climatestoriesproject.org
 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar - Seriously, read the following and save it for your reference: 

  • Log into the webinar AT LEAST 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial 1-(562)-247-8422 for audio. The access code is: 295-545-703. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 119-255-931

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to our Web page 

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to our Listserv

Time: 3:30 p.m. ET / 2:30 p.m. CT / 1:30 p.m. MT / 12:30 p.m. PT

One of the key needs for successful implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards are resources that are well-aligned to the standards. The Educators Evaluating the Quality of Instructional Products (EQuIP) Rubric for science provides criteria by which to measure the alignment and overall quality of lessons and units with respect to the NGSS. The rubric is an effective tool that enables teachers and administrators, in teams or individually, to review existing instructional materials to determine what revisions are needed, provide constructive criterion-based feedback to developers, and identify exemplars/models for teachers' use within and across states. Register today!

The web seminar will provide guidance on:

  • the key attributes resources should have to meet the letter and spirit of NGSS
  • the structure and features of the rubric
  • using the rubric to select and supplement curriculum resources

Details

Title: Evaluating Resources for NGSS: The EQuIP Rubric
Target audience: Educators of grades K-12
Dates: Tuesday, July 29, 2014
Time: 3:30 p.m. ET / 2:30 p.m. CT / 1:30 p.m. MT / 12:30 p.m. PT
Duration: 90 minutes
Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenters: Brian J. Reiser and Joe Krajcik

This e-workshop developed by the FrameWorks Institute in partnership with the New England Aquarium gives an introductory look at how interpreters can utilize Strategic Framing to more effectively communicate the ocean and climate change story with the public. If you are interested in learning more about how to use Strategic Framing at your institution consider applying to a NNOCCI Study Circle. See the New England Aquarium's partner page for more information.

This workshop functions best in a modern Web browser that supports HTML5. We recommend Google ChromeFireFoxSafari, or IE9.

Dr. Nicole Ardoin, an assistant professor on a joint appointment with Stanford University’s Graduate School of Education and Woods Institute for the Environment, will speak about the potential for cross-sector coordination to initiate large scale social change. We'll be co-hosting this webinar with 10 of our affiliates. Stay tuned for more!

Click here(link is external) to find out more about Nicole and her work on collective impact and environmental education. Then,register for the webinar held on Tuesday, July 26 at 3:00 EST.(link is external)

Collective Impact is a framework to tackle deeply entrenched and complex social problems. It is an innovative and structured approach to making collaboration work across government, business, philanthropy, non-profit organizations and citizens to achieve significant and lasting social change. Dr. Nicole Ardoin has been involved in various projects aimed at researching and evaluating collective impact initiatives. In 2011, Dr. Ardoin and a group of researchers and nonprofit partners launched the ChangeScale(link is external) initiative, a collaborative partnership among diverse nonprofit, government, and community-serving organizations in the San Francisco and Monterey Bay Area who, collectively, have interest in expanding the scope and impact of regional environmental education efforts. ChangeScale partners have used the collective impact framework to guide their efforts. Through this process, ChangeScale leaders and members have developed a theory of change, begun to pursue collaborative activities, and are expanding access and relevance of environmental education and literacy programs in the Bay Area. 

ChangeScale partners have developed a theory of change highlighting strategies to strengthen and build the field of environmental education. By following the principles of collective impact, ChangeScale members work together to impact in the following areas:

  • Enhancing the quality of environmental education by weaving research-based practices into program models;
  • Expanding relevance so that environmental education is available to – and influenced by – socioeconomically and culturally diverse communities;
  • Increasing engagement and participation by a wider range of sectors and stakeholders in the design and delivery of the environmental education system; and
  • Fostering collaboration, which will facilitate unity in message, vision, and standards as well as growth and scope of environmental education programs.

Nicole Ardoin is an assistant professor with a joint appointment in the Graduate School of Education and the Woods Institute for the Environment at Stanford University. Professor Ardoin´s research focuses on environmental behavior as influenced by environmental learning and motivated by place-based connections. In particular, she is interested in considerations of geographic scale, which is an understudied yet crucial aspect of people-place relationships in a rapidly globalizing, urbanizing world. Professor Ardoin has current studies on the use of education, communications, and other social strategies in informal and community-based settings, including nature-based tourism programs, to engage individuals and communities in deliberate dialogue, environmental decision-making, and informed conservation behavior.

Professor Ardoin also researches the effectiveness of a range of environmental education and social science endeavors in achieving measurable and meaningful conservation results. To this end, she conducts evaluations with informal organizations including museums, zoos/aquariums, parks, and residential environmental education programs, with an emphasis on using innovative, non-traditional metrics and adaptive management approaches. She is also interested in philanthropic support of environmental education and emergent trends in the field of environmental education research.

How to Register:

Please click here to register for the webinar.(link is external)

If you are unable to attend the webinar, please stay tuned! We will be linking the recorded webinar to this post following the event. 

 

Image credit: Bay Area environmental educators meeting at the EcoCenter at Heron's Head Park to discuss their work on climate change. (Link is external)

 

7:30 pm Eastern Time

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project is honored to present Dr. John Holdren, Assistant to the President for Science and Technology and Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and Dr. Richard Spinrad, NOAA Chief Scientist as the featured speakers for our June, 2015 national webinar.

Dr. Holdren will discuss U.S. efforts to cut carbon pollution, prepare for climate impacts, and lead internationally through the President’s Climate Action Plan. He will describe how the Climate Action Plan is advancing science, including actionable information and tools useful to educators, to enhance understanding and awareness of climate risks and impacts. Dr. Holdren will also discuss the Office of Science & Technology Policy’s Climate Education and Literacy Initiative, an opportunity to advance collaboration on climate education, both inside and outside of government. Effective climate action depends on climate-literate students, citizens, and decision makers to develop and implement solutions. 

Dr. Spinrad will speak on citizen science and how it can be a valuable tool for science educators to help students connect with science as a constant and intimate part of their lives. That benefit reaches beyond formal and informal learning. Today, scientists and policy makers recognize the impact and unique value of doing citizen science “in our own backyards” to advancing our scientific understanding of climate change and the risks associated with it. Dr. Spinrad will further focus on the role of citizen science in developing climate indicators, and how this effort and your input will help us connect the dots between data and resilience in our communities nationwide.

Space is limited. Reserve Your Spot at:

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar

Please share this opportunity will all interested colleagues and Networks. 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar. Seriously, read the following and save it for reference:

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting at the start time.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting using VOIP, dial +1 (562) 247-8421 for audio. The access code is: 316-091-230. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 158-550-003

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

To join our email list and receive information on upcoming webinars, book club meetings, and access to archives, send an email tobruce.moravchik@noaa.gov. In the subject line type "Join The Climate Stewards Education Community”  

 

Teams gather to rapidly prototype game designs (online, pervasive, tabletop, or other formats) and to inject new ideas to help grow the game industry and make educational climate information accessible to a range of audiences.  This is a unique opportunity for students, educators, scientists, game designers and interested public members to work together on the development of climate game prototypes that span a range of platforms, topics, and audiences.

Interested in hosting a local site?   Sign up your site at tinyurl.com/climategamejam

Recognition!  Each site will select a People’s Choice at the end of that site’s jam.  Teams can submit a 2-minute video via Dropbox for consideration and selection for National recognition including:

  • Selection for additional game development support from GlassLabs
  • Selection for inclusion in the Smithsonian Learning Lab – Excellent K-12 “classroom ready” entries that feature sound scientific concepts have the opportunity to be included on the Smithsonian’s new Learning Lab. As part of the Learning Lab, these games will be available to educators across the nation.
  • Selection for inclusion in the National Museum of Natural History’s showcase – Select finalists will be offered the opportunity to be showcased in an arcade on the grounds of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. The showcase will take place in November.

Upcoming Pre-Jam Events:

Remake Learning Hang-out: Games in the Classroom, September 22, 2 pm EST

Extreme Event: River City Game Night, September 30, 6:30-8:30 pm EST, Koshland Science Museum, Washington, D.C. 

NOS’s Communications and Education Division is providing organizational leadership for this event and is working closely with NOAA’s Climate Program Office and other NOAA offices for subject matter expertise. Partners include Smithsonian Institution; Koshland Science Center; GlassLab; Entertainment Software Association; Wilson Center; California Academy of Science; STEMHero; Polar Learning and Responding (PoLAR) Climate Change Education Partnership; University of Oklahoma; Paleontological Research Institute (Cornell); Harmony High School (FL); Barnard College; Michigan Technological University; BrainPOP; and Zulama.

Interested in more information?

Contact Peg.Steffen@noaa.gov 

Why games?

Games are increasingly used in educational and other settings to help inspire curiosity, creativity, collaboration, optimism, and problem-solving skills.  They provide a powerful opportunity for enhancing climate literacy. Serious games address real-world challenges, compress big problems into immediate experiences, encourage systems thinking, and promote active engagement, making them particularly well suited to climate change education.  The field of games focused on climate change is growing, yet there remain gaps in the type of content covered.  

In December 2014, the White House Office of Science & Technology Policy launched the Climate Education and Literacy Initiative with the goal of connecting American students with best-availablescientificinformation about climate change. As a commitment in support of this effort, Federal and non-governmental experts are collaborating to harness the promise of educational games and interactive media to enhance understanding and awareness of climate change impacts and solutions.

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