Learn to teach basic climate science and empower your students to take action. Practice teaching the carbon cycle, investigate "garbology," and develop simple student action projects. Content is focused on grades five to eight.

Location: Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, CA

 

Looking for fun, hands-on activities to engage your visitors, students and community on the topic of climate change?  Come to the New England Aquarium for a FREE training about these activities and climate change education. 

This training is ideal for classroom teachers and informal educators from various institutions hoping to engage students and adults around the topic of climate change. 

 

This program featured:

  • Presentation by the award-winning Alliance for Climate Education (ACE)
  • Student moderators and panel discussions
  • Videos of student-led projects from across the country
  • Student perspectives that will lead to the conversation in the second webcast

A recording is available.

Monday, October 3 at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project is pleased to welcome Dr. Lori Kumler, Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Studies at the University of Mount Union; and Dr. Bethany Vosburg-Bluem, Professor of Social Studies and Teacher Education at Otterbein University as our featured speakers this month.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Drs. Kumler and Vosburg-Bluem will focus on why teaching about climate change is so often limited to the natural science context. They suggest that learning about climate change from a social science context provides new opportunities to engage learners. For example, you might have learners address the question of why climate change is such a hot potato political topic. Students can examine documents such as national political party platforms, candidate speeches, and media articles to address this question. Within the social sciences learners can also examine the historical implications of how we came to this global tipping point and how we can use the past to more critically examine our current and future decisions and actions. What is OUR role as environmental citizens both locally and globally? In this webinar, they will address reasons why and how you can approach climate change using politics, geography, economics, or history. They will also discuss how the social sciences provide useful insights into student participation beyond typical approaches such as individual tree planting, changing transportation modes, or installing energy efficient devices.

For more background on Drs. Kumler and Vosburg-Bluem thoughts in this area, read their article Climate Change in the Social Studies Classroom: A "Why" and "How" Guide Using the C3 Framework.

Important Information for participating in this Webinar

  • We recommend you log into the webinar AT LEAST 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option to listen to this presentation. All participants will be muted for the duration of the broadcast.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial 1-(914)-614-3221for audio. The access code is: 446-740-424. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 893-397-379

Visit the NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project Web page for more information

Sign up to the Listserv to receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities.

Monday, February 1st at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

Getting Real: Health in the Teaching of Climate and Earth Science
 

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project welcomes Dr. John M. Balbus, M.D., M.P.H., Senior Advisor for Public Health to the Director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences as our featured speaker this month.

Presentation Abstract: 

The impacts on health of climate change as well as the societal responses to climate change are varied and significant. In the past five years, recognition of the importance of the health implications of climate change has grown enormously, from major reports in the premier international medical journal Lancet to messaging from the President about the US Clean Power Plant rule and Climate Action Plan. Understanding how climate change and climate variability affect people’s health and well being is a foundational aspect of basic climate literacy. For teachers, integrating content and exercises on health provides an opportunity to engage students in earth science with projects that both demonstrate the relevance of the science and also require development of critical analytic and synthetic skills. Health content related to climate change can also augment curricula in the social sciences, history, literature, and the visual arts. This talk will summarize the health implications of climate change and encourage discussion of how health content can help teachers achieve their educational goals. 
 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial 1-(914)-614-3221 for audio. The access code is: 367-785-127. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 145-578-259

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to our Web page

 

This course explores the science of climate change. Students will learn how the climate system works; what factors cause climate to change across different time scales and how those factors interact; how climate has changed in the past; how scientists use models, observations and theory to make predictions about future climate; and the possible consequences of climate change for our planet. The course explores evidence for changes in ocean temperature, sea level and acidity due to global warming. Students will learn how climate change today is different from past climate cycles and how satellites and other technologies are revealing the global signals of a changing climate. Finally, the course looks at the connection between human activity and the current warming trend and considers some of the potential social, economic and environmental consequences of climate change.

 

Authoring Scientists

Ed Mathez, Geologist

Gavin Schmidt, Climatologist
 
Drew Shindell, Climatologist

 

Key Science Concepts

The Sun is the primary source of energy for Earth's climate system. The Earth's energy is in balance, or equilibrium, when Earth emits the same amount of energy as it absorbs.

The climate system is dynamic and has many interrelated components. A change in any one component can influence the equilibrium of the system and result in climate changes.

Climate varies over space and time through both natural and human sources. These forces operate over time periods ranging from years to hundreds of millions or even billions of years and vary widely with location on Earth.

Human activities – particularly the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide since the Industrial Revolution – are affecting the climate system today, leading to warming temperatures globally.

Evidence for variations in past climates is held in ocean and lake sediments, ice cores, corals, tree rings, and other geologic records. Understanding past climate informs us about how the present climate system works and how it might change in the future.

Climate change will have consequences for the Earth system including human society. Climate change research involves extensive observations, theory and modeling. Future climate change scenarios are essential to informing efforts to mitigate and to adapt to the consequences of climate change.

Graduate Credit

This course is approved for graduate credit and continuing education units from leading institutions at an additional cost.

 

 

July 31 to August 1- ONLINE SESSIONS
August 5-6 - SESSIONS at NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Columbia University in New York City 
Graduate Credit Option: University of Michigan-Flint
 
Climate Change in the Classroom is a professional development event for 8th – 12th grade English, Math, Science and Social Studies teachers. The workshop sponsors, GISS, Columbia University, the Science Museum of Minnesota, University of Michigan-Flint, Real World Matters and Mindblue Productions, invite teachers to explore the science underlying global climate change in today's headlines with researchers on the frontlines of advancing knowledge.  A special focus will be developing climate literacy to evaluate energy solutions for mitigating global climate change.  Guided by education faculty, teachers will pilot a new curriculum - Hot: One World, One Climate. CCIC will involve teachers in a learning experience that will deepen understanding about how students learn science, build strategies for using climate change topics as a context for science and math instruction, and facilitate student learning through problem-solving, inquiry and an engaging role-play simulation.            
 
Learn More and Apply @ http://www.giss.nasa.gov/meetings/

This month's webinar will build on the theme of Earth's Energy Budget with an investigation into clouds and their role in Earth's climate system. Participants will learn about resources from the Students' Cloud Observations On-Line, or S'COOL, program that allows students to practice cloud identification and submit observations to NASA as citizen scientists. Participants will also take a closer look at posters and interactive features created using data from the CERES instrument that is aboard a variety of NASA satellites.

Certificates of professional development hours are available upon request. Additional session dates will be announced soon.

January 28, 2016
12-1 pm ET

 

People make hundreds of decisions every day, weighing risks and benefits and coming to conclusions. In a perfect world, people are objective when they perceive risks and make decisions in climate and other domains. But psychological research suggests that this is not always how the human mind works.

In this webinar, they will consider examples in climate change and other politically charged domains, and present evidence-based strategies that can help improve communication.

The webinar is free. To register click here. Once registered, you will receive a confirmation email with log-in information.

Speaker: Dr. Ellen Peters, The Ohio State University

Dr. Ellen Peters is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Decision Sciences Collaborative at The Ohio State University. Her research focuses on understanding the basic building blocks of human judgment and decision making, including how critical information can be communicated to facilitate better decisions in health, financial, and environmental contexts. She is former President of the Society for Judgment and Decision Making, former Chair of FDA’s Risk Communication Advisory Committee, and is a current member of the National Academies committee on the Science of Science Communication. She is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, and the Society of Experimental Psychology. Her research has been funded extensively by the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health.

Visit changingclimate.osu.edu and greatlakesclimate.com to view previous webinars and other climate resources.

 

6-7:00pm ET/3-4:00pm PT

The GLOBE Program  originally developed posters and activities for teachers to help students explore the concepts of Earth as a system, find patterns and connections between and among maps containing different environmental data, and to understand the relationship between time and space in regard to global environmental data.

In 2014, a digital GLOBE Earth system ePoster is now provided by the MY NASA DATA project to extend the opportunities for learning. This digital poster provides data for 2005 through 2013 and enables interactive exploration of the data in more detail through the use of animations. The animations can be used with students to find patterns among different environmental data, understand the relationship among different environmental parameters, and understand how the data changes seasonally and over longer time scales.

In this interactive educator webinar, Tina Harte, education specialist at NASA Langley Research Center and former middle school science teacher, will explore the ePoster and activities will be discussed for K-12 students, with a focus on those meeting NGSS performance expectations, science practices and cross-cutting concepts related to Earth System Science.

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