Join us on Monday, April 13th at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

There is increasing recognition of the significance of how Traditional Environmental Knowledge (TEK) can inform our understanding of the impacts of climate change and strategies for adaptation and mitigation. Indigenous people bring a collective knowledge of the land, sky and sea and provide a crucial foundation for community-based adaptation and mitigation. Indigenous knowledge has been long recognized as a key source of information and insight in domains such as forestry, traditional medicine, biodiversity conservation, resource management, impact assessment, and natural disaster preparedness and response. 
 
NOAA’s Climate Stewards Education Project is honored collaborate with Cultural Specialists from the Smithsonian Museum of the American Indian, Project Indigenous, and Educators from the University of Wisconsin-Extension to present this webinar on TEK, how it can inform our understanding of a changing climate's impacts on coastal and inland Indigenous people, and useful teaching materials to bring these ideas together. 
  • Dennis Zotigh, Kiowa, San Juan Pueblo and Santee Dakota, Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, will provide an opening song. 
  • Scott Frazier, Crow/Santee, Project Indigenous, will discuss climate change impacts on sacred sites/sacred places, and what TEK can offer in adapting to climate change impacts. 
  • Albert “Abby” Ybarra, Yaqui-Tohono O'Odham, Project Indigenous, will present Three Sisters Gardening, an ancient method of farming and how it can be used to connect youth to the earth, annual cycles of growth, and climate change. 
  • Cathy Techmann, University of Wisconsin-Extension, will present G-WOW “Gikinoo’wizhiwe Onji Waaban” (Guiding for Tomorrow), a climate service learning initiative integrating climate change research, TEK, and place-based evidence of climate change impacts on traditional Ojibwe lifeways to provide knowledge about what can be done to mitigate or adapt to a changing climate for people of all culture

Following the webinar, there will be an informal discussion of the topics presented. All attendees are invited to participate. There are limited spaces for this discussion, information on joining will be provided during the event.

Please share this opportunity will all interested colleagues and Networks.

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar

Important Information for participating in this Webinar. Seriously, read the following and save it for reference:

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting at the start time.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting using VOIP, dial +1 (415) 655-0059 for audio. The access code is: 926-695-389. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
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For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

 

July 31 to August 1- ONLINE SESSIONS
August 5-6 - SESSIONS at NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Columbia University in New York City 
Graduate Credit Option: University of Michigan-Flint
 
Climate Change in the Classroom is a professional development event for 8th – 12th grade English, Math, Science and Social Studies teachers. The workshop sponsors, GISS, Columbia University, the Science Museum of Minnesota, University of Michigan-Flint, Real World Matters and Mindblue Productions, invite teachers to explore the science underlying global climate change in today's headlines with researchers on the frontlines of advancing knowledge.  A special focus will be developing climate literacy to evaluate energy solutions for mitigating global climate change.  Guided by education faculty, teachers will pilot a new curriculum - Hot: One World, One Climate. CCIC will involve teachers in a learning experience that will deepen understanding about how students learn science, build strategies for using climate change topics as a context for science and math instruction, and facilitate student learning through problem-solving, inquiry and an engaging role-play simulation.            
 
Learn More and Apply @ http://www.giss.nasa.gov/meetings/

Time – 4:00 PM or 7:00 PM (EDT) 

Duration: 1 hour

Date: May 2, 2016

To join the webinar go to:

http://remc.adobeconnect.com/ICCARS2015-2016

then call 877-336-1828 and add the access code 1767689. 

 

Are you an educator interested in Learning and Sharing about Climate Change and Remote Sensing?  

If so, join hosts David Bydlowski and Andy Henry, Monday, May 2, 2016 for the ICCARS (Investigating Climate Change and Remote Sensing) Professional Learning Network (PLN) webinar series.

This month’s topic is “Climate Change: Science, Impacts, and How Individuals Can Help,” with special guest Dr. Tom Kovacs, Professor of Meteorology in the Department of Geography and Geology and Program Director for the IESS Program, Eastern Michigan University.

Tom received his B.S. in Meteorology from Northern Illinois University, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Meteorology from the Pennsylvania State University. His research involves satellite remote sensing of the atmosphere with weather and climate applications. He was the lead of science studies for the Hampton University NASA contract for the Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission. The CALIPSO satellite, launched on April 28, 2006, has on-board a nadir looking three-channel polarization sensitive lidar. He is currently a professor at Eastern Michigan University (EMU) and teaches weather and climate courses to future teachers and scientists. He is also coordinator for the Interdisciplinary Environmental Science and Society program at EMU. Collectively, he has authored over 20 peer-reviewed journal articles and conference abstracts.

For more information on the ICCARS PLN webinar series, please visit:

http://www.iccarsproject.net/resources/lifelines-plc

Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

Join NSTA for this web seminar on July 10 and learn how the Learning Center—NSTA's e-PD portal with over 11,600 resources, a community of like-minded individuals, and professional learning tools—can help you enhance and extend your content and pedagogical knowledge of Earth and Space Science science topics.Register today!

 

This program is designed for educators of grades K-12. The seminar's discussion will focus on resources related to the topics of Earth, Sun, and Moon and the The Solar System. An archive and related PowerPoint presentation will be available at the end of the program.

Details

Title: Enhance Your Content and Pedagogical Knowledge Using NSTA Resources: Earth and Space Science
Target audience: K - 12 teachers
Date: Thursday, July 10, 2014
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenter: Don Boonstra

This webinar is underwritten by the GE Foundation.  NOAA is a Content Collaborator of NSTA's Learning Center



 

On April 22, 2015 please join us for a live webinar showcasing The Wild Center’s Youth Climate Summit — designed by and for high school students. The Association of Science-Technology Centers (ASTC) and The Wild Center have teamed up to share a successful Youth Climate Summit format designed to engage high school students in climate literacy through meaningful dialogue and action planning on climate change. We will highlight this program through a two-hour webinar that will provide an overview of the Youth Climate Summit concept, impacts and outcomes for schools and students, and the planning resources available for free through our Youth Climate Summit Toolkit. Project Director Jen Kretser along with two summit students — Erin Weaver and Meadow Hackett — will be sharing their experiences.

Encouraged by US government leaders and interest by other science centers, our collective goal is to share this convening program format at no cost and support the development of at least 10 Youth Climate Summits across the international science museum community in 2015. We will offer all the organizational tools you will need along with connections to scientific experts in your region.

Climate literacy education continues to be an urgent issue and this program format allows for informal science institutions such as science centers, zoos, aquariums, and non-profits to join in the international effort. Youth Climate Summits have been found to be powerful vehicles for inspiration, learning, community engagement, and youth leadership development. Climate literacy with a focus on local climate impacts and solutions is a key component of the Youth Climate Summit. The project-based learning surrounding the creation of a unique, student driven, sustainability and Climate Action Plan promotes leadership skills applicable to and the tools necessary for a 21st Century workforce. This effort was highlighted as a commitment in support of theWhite House Office of Science & Technology Policy’s Climate Education and Literacy Initiative, with the goal of connecting American students and citizens with the best-available, science-based information about climate change. The meeting is being hosted by the Department of Energy office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy as part of their efforts to support Climate and Energy Literacy.

The Youth Climate Summit Toolkit can be accessed here.

This short video provides an overview of the Adirondack Youth Climate Summit.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE:

Wednesday, April 22
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET
Youth Climate Summit

Please join the webinar from your computer, tablet, or smartphone here:https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/327254349

You can also dial in using your phone:
   United States – +1 (872) 240-3312
   Access Code: 327-254-349

For anyone in the Washington DC area, we invite you to attend in person at the US Department of Energy. Please RSVP to:
Joshua Sneideman, Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow
Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
202-586-5695
joshua.sneideman@ee.doe.gov

Learn about integrating climate change education into your classroom or informal education programming, get an introduction to regionally relevant climate science, and hear about how other educators have used these materials. The webinar will be presented by educators who have used the resources in their own teaching, both in the classroom and in place-based education.

Certificates of attendance for professional development contact hours can be requested after the webinar; instructions will be provided during the session.

The presentation will cover:

  • Ohio Sea Grant’s updated Great Lakes Climate Change Curriculum
  • climate and Great Lakes literacy principles
  • informal resources to supplement and expand lesson plans

​Monday, May 2nd at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

Have you ever wondered what would be the best way to talk about climate change? Have you felt unsure if your message is clear and connects to your students or audiences? If so, then this webinar is for you! Effectively communicating complex issues involves sound science and an element of artistry. The FrameWorks Institute interviewed over 18,000 Americans and conducted multiple experiments on the topic of communicating climate chanage to identify the “frames” or messaging strategies, which are most likely to help the public understand that:

  • fossil fuels are the primary cause of climate change
  • our ocean is part of the climate change story
  • we need alternative energy solutions at the community-based level
  • these are all issues that we can and should tackle

 

Find out how you can use these simple, clear, and effective messages to communicate climate change in your classroom and beyond!

Important Information for participating in this Webinar

Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.

  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial 1-(415)-655-0060 for audio. The access code is: 522-086-880. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 144-217-139

 

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to their Web page 

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to the Climate Stewards Listserv

July 14-18, 2014 
University of Delaware, Virden Center 
Lewes, Delaware

 

Goals of the Climate Science Academy

With the National Science Foundation’s support, climate scientists, learning scientists, and educators are working together to embed climate change science into formal and informal education in Delaware and Maryland. As both states work to implement the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), MADE CLEAR is working at the cutting edge of curriculum alignment, professional content knowledge, assessment development, and implementation strategies. We anticipate that the Academy will be of particular interest to 8th grade science teachers in Delaware. From Maryland, we ask LEA science supervisors to identify a target grade level and form Academy teams that can bring climate change planning back to their LEA. From both states, we encourage the inclusion of informal educators on teacher teams.

While at the five-day Summer Program, your team will design and refine climate change curriculum and assessments under the framework of NGSS. The Summer Program and school year follow-up sessions will give you the opportunity to:

  • enhance your understanding of a range of climate science topics
  • appreciate how climate science involves science/engineering practices, cross-cutting concepts such as systems and energy, and literacy in science and technical subjects
  • collaborate in the design of assessments structured to support NGSS
  • develop a climate curriculum framework to be tested and further developed throughout the school year and a professional development plan to scale up the teaching of climate science across your LEA
  • gain access to a community of experts in climate science disciplines, in local impacts of climate change, and in learning sciences

The goal is to bring the science to you in a way that is meaningful, place-based, and employs best practices in climate science education. While you investigate the science of climate change through focused activities, we will provide opportunities for your team to build an implementation plan that will work for you.

 

 Friday, April 17 at 1:00 PM EDT

In this webinar, a panel of Arctic experts will present the booklet and outline how climate changes currently underway in the Arctic are a driver for global sea-level rise, offer new prospects for natural resource extraction, and have rippling effects through the world’s weather, climate, food supply and economy. The webinar will feature a presentation and Q&A session with:

Julie Brigham-Grette, Professor of Quaternary/Glacial Geology at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, Chair of the National Research Council’s Polar Research Board, and Co-Chair of the authoring committee of Lessons and Legacies of International Polar Year 2007-2008.

Stephanie Pfirman, Professor of Environmental Sciences at Barnard College and Co-Chair of the authoring committee of The Arctic in the Anthropocene: Emerging Research Questions.

James White, Director of the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, Professor of Geological Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and Chair of the authoring committee of Abrupt Impacts of Climate Change: Anticipating Surprises.

 

Arctic Matters: The Global Connection to Changes in the Arctic

Download the Booklet PDF

Register for the webinar

Interactive website — coming soon!

This booklet is an educational resource from the National Research Council’s Polar Research Board that introduces the threats and opportunities of the Arctic’s rapidly changing environment and explains why the Arctic matters — to all of us.

Viewed in satellite images as a jagged white coat draped over the top of the globe, the high Arctic appears distant and isolated. But even if you don’t live there, don’t do business there, and will never travel there, you are closer to the Arctic than you think.

Arctic Matters: The Global Connection to Changes in the Arctic draws on a large collection of peer-reviewed National Research Council reports and other national and international reports to provide a brief, reader-friendly primer on the complex ways in which the changes currently affecting the Arctic and its diverse people, resources, and environment can, in turn, affect the entire globe.

 

This course explores the science of climate change. Students will learn how the climate system works; what factors cause climate to change across different time scales and how those factors interact; how climate has changed in the past; how scientists use models, observations and theory to make predictions about future climate; and the possible consequences of climate change for our planet. The course explores evidence for changes in ocean temperature, sea level and acidity due to global warming. Students will learn how climate change today is different from past climate cycles and how satellites and other technologies are revealing the global signals of a changing climate. Finally, the course looks at the connection between human activity and the current warming trend and considers some of the potential social, economic and environmental consequences of climate change.

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