Student teams design and build solar water heating devices that mimic those used in residences to capture energy in the form of solar radiation and convert it to thermal energy. In this activity, students gain a better understanding of the three different types of heat transfer, each of which plays a role in the solar water heater design. Once the model devices are constructed, students perform efficiency calculations and compare designs.

This is the first of three short videos showcasing the dramatic changes in Alaska's marine ecosystems. This introduction to the impacts of climate change in Alaska includes interviews with Alaska Natives, commentary by scientists, and footage from Alaska's Arctic.

Students investigate passive solar building design with a focus on heating. Insulation, window placement, thermal mass, surface colors, and site orientation are addressed in the background materials and design preparation. Students test their projects for thermal gains and losses during a simulated day and night then compare designs with other teams for suggestions for improvements.

This PBS video focuses on sea level rise in Norfolk, Virginia and how the residents are managing the logistical, financial and political implications. Science journalists who have been studying Norfolk's rising sea level problems are interviewed, as well as local residents who are being impacted.

In this hands-on engineering activity, students build a tabletop wind turbine. Students get acquainted with the basics of wind energy and power production by fabricating and testing various blade designs for table-top windmills, constructed from one-inch PVC pipe and balsa wood (or recycled materials). The activity includes lots of good media and Web resources supporting the science content.

One of a suite of online climate interactive simulations, this Greenhouse Gas Simulator uses the bathtub model to demonstrate how atmospheric concentrations of CO2 will continue to rise unless they are lowered to match the amount of CO2 that can be removed through natural processes.

In this classroom activity, students measure the energy use of various appliances and electronics and calculate how much carbon dioxide (CO2) is released to produce that energy.

Hot Topics in Climate Communication with Susan Joy Hassol

Abstract: For the CLEAN Network and beyond, our work in communicating about climate change has never been more important. From the threats posed by the new political climate, to fake news, to some in our community still shooting themselves in the foot on some issues, the challenges are enormous. Susan will discuss her current thinking on these issues including some of my recently published articles on these topics. We'll focus on words that matter and issues that arise as we pursue the world's most important and time-sensitive conversation.

Bio: Susan Joy Hassol is the Director of Climate Communication, known for her ability to translate science into English. For more than 25 years she has helped scientists, journalists, and others communicate more effectively on climate. She was the Senior Science Writer on all three National Climate Assessments, wrote an HBO documentary, has testified before Congress, publishes widely, and leads communication workshops. She's an elected fellow of AAAS for her "exceptional contributions in the area of science communication, particularly for communication of the science of climate change to policymakers and the public." For more see www.climatecommunication.org

Each Tuesday at 1:00pm Eastern Time (12pm Central, 11am Mountain, 10am Pacific) CLEAN Network members meet on a teleconference call to update each other about their climate literacy projects, upcoming events, and funding opportunities and share information about best practices, key teaching/learning resources, and the development of collaborative activities. Often these teleconferences include special presentations by members and guests. 

To participate in these teleconferences, you need to be a member of the CLEAN Network. To join the Network, sign up here Join CLEAN Network.

Members receive an email alert from the CLEAN Network listserv with information about each week's teleconference.

 

Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

Did you know that there are at least several hundred tiny particles in one cubic centimeter of air? Did you know that there is “good” ozone and “bad” ozone? We’ll explore what’s in the air we breathe; how and why scientists measure air pollution, and the growing popularity of citizen science. You will learn a fun hands-on activity for students to build their own monitor using the latest micro sensors. These air sensor kits measure particle pollution (commonly known as dust) and turn on light bulbs based on the level in the atmosphere. 

Details

Target audience: K-12 teachers
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenter: Dr. Gayle Hagler

 

Abstract: A recent systematic literature review explored climate change education to understand effective strategies for teaching about this topic. Using the EBSCOhost search engine, we found 959 unique records and screened these abstracts for studies including empirically measured outcomes of an educational intervention. A final sample of 49 papers were read by the research team and several common themes emerged from analysis. While several themes create effective instruction for any topic (e.g., relevant, meaningful, experiential), working with climate change can make these qualities more difficult to achieve. Additional characteristics seem to be important for controversial and value-laden issues, such as addressing misconceptions, interacting with scientists, conducting projects, and engaging in deliberative discussion. This presentation will introduce the process of a systematic review and explain the themes that we found.

This presentation is part of the eeWORKS program of the North American Association for Environmental Education. This work was funded by the Pine Integrated Network: Education, Mitigation, and Adaptation project (PINEMAP), which is a Coordinated Agricultural Project funded bythe USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture under Award # 2011-68002-30185.

Bio: Martha Monroe is responsible for extension activities, research, and courses related to environmental education, conservation behavior, and human dimensions of wildland-urban interface issues. Her work includes the development and evaluation of curriculum resources for educators and understanding how people perceive issues such as wildfire and woody biomass in the South. She is exploring strategies for engaging people in helpful dialogue and productive change as we move toward sustainability.

Each Tuesday at 1:00pm Eastern Time (12pm Central, 11am Mountain, 10am Pacific) CLEAN Network members meet on a teleconference call to update each other about their climate literacy projects, upcoming events, and funding opportunities and share information about best practices, key teaching/learning resources, and the development of collaborative activities. Often these teleconferences include special presentations by members and guests. 

To participate in these teleconferences, you need to be a member of the CLEAN Network. To join the Network, sign up here Join CLEAN Network.

Members receive an email alert from the CLEAN Network listserv with information about each week's teleconference.

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