Students model the effect of greenhouse gases on Earth's atmosphere. They find that greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide and methane, are uniquely shaped to catch and pass on infrared radiation, and so they are responsible for the warmth we enjoy on Earth. The children discuss how the addition of greenhouse gases by human activities leads to further warming and what steps we can take to slow it.

Students perform a lab to explore how the color of materials at Earth's surface affect the amount of warming. Topics covered include developing a hypothesis, collecting data, and making interpretations to explain why dark-colored materials become hotter.

A suite of hands-on activities to give students the opportunity to describe the shape and appearance of clouds and learn the types of weather that are associated with clouds. The module includes outdoor observation, group work, and creative/artistic activities.

Students observe the process of evaporation, make comparisons about the process, then construct a diagram and use it to describe the process of evaporation.

In this lesson, students will learn about the water cycle and how energy from the sun and the force of gravity drive this cycle.

Students analyze and interpret graphs to compare the flow of shortwave energy from the Sun toward China over the course of a year on cloudy versus clear days.

This activity was developed to give participants an understanding of Earth's water cycle by completing a WebQuest and building a model of the water cycle.

Included in this lesson are opportunities to weave cloud study into Science, Language Arts, and Math. This lesson includes a demonstration of cloud formation, data collection and analysis of air temperatures and cloud coverage across time, and creation of an acrostic poem on the word CLOUDS.

Several activities that introduce students to the concepts of earth as a series of systems that are all connected. All of the activities reinforce the idea that water, air, soil, and living things all interact in the Earth system. There are several components that educators can choose to use: a book, a play, two activities, and two coloring pages.

In this 60-minute interactive demonstration, students use ice blocks and heat lamps to model what will happen to coastlines around the world as glaciers melt. They explore why glaciers are melting as a consequence of global warming and how human activity has added to the amount of warming.