Date: Wednesday, April 29, 2015
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

In July, 2012, the world witnessed a shocking event when widespread melting occurred over the surface of 97% of the Greenland Ice Sheet. According to ice core records, the last time such widespread melting occurred was in 1889. What caused such widespread melt? Was it just the warm temperatures, or is it a more complicated situation? Register today!

Dr. Mary Albert and her Dartmouth graduate students happened to be on the Greenland Ice Sheet at just the right time to gather some evidence. They excavated samples of the refrozen surface melt layer to take back to the U.S. for study, where their team investigated the physical, chemical, and isotopic aspects of that layer. They also looked deeper into the ice sheet and investigated evidence from firn (old snow) cores that contained melt layers dating back to 1889. They discovered that both in 2012 and in 1889, the warming and soot that changed the snow albedo (reflectivity) had both been necessary to synergistically create the melt; neither factor alone could have achieved melt in the cold, high, dry snow regions on the ice sheet.

Alden Adolph is now working with Mary on a project in New Hampshire to investigate climate change, snow albedo, and land use change on a project that is much closer to home. In Greenland, the soot from forest fires travels long distances to end up on the snow, where it changes the albedo. In New Hampshire, soot and aerosols can come from similar distant sources, but also from very local sources like wood stoves down the street. Alden will show how engineers and scientists use evidence to examine the importance of snow albedo even here in New England. Alden will also share ways in which she inspires younger students in the field, so that they can share in the excitement of research. Please join us for this relevant webinar, to learn how scientists used evidence from multiple sources to learn what caused the recent big melt, and why understanding your regional albedo is important to your future.

Details

Title: Fire and Ice: Snow Albedo and Our Future
Target audience: K–12 educators
Date: Wednesday, April 29, 2015
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenter: Dr. Mary AlbertAlden AdolphLinda Morris

Registration

Register today to participate in this web seminar. Upon registering you will receive an e-mail confirmation including information about the program and suggested links to visit in preparation of the event. Additional information about the web seminar will be e-mailed to you days before the program.

Each web seminar is a unique, stand-alone, program. Archives of the web seminars and the presenters’ PowerPoint presentations will be available through the links on this web page. Learn more about the features of the web seminar and read answers to frequently asked questions from participants.

 

Monday, June 13 through Thursday, June 16, 2016. 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM MT (with some evening events)

 

NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project (CSEP) is collaborating with Federal, State and NGO partners to convene four climate-science workshops for formal and informal educators. Participants will hear from and interact with climate science, education and communication experts, and visit research facilities to explore foundational technologies and innovations in Earth-system research. This workshop in Salt Lake City, Utah will focus on the region and topical impacts of climate change, with a goal of connecting educators and their students/audiences to the best-available, science-based information and resources about climate change.

Registration for the Salt Lake City, Utah workshop is open, however there are attendance limits for the workshop, and we are advertising them nationally.  Availability will be on a first come first serve basis, so register early for your workshop. Participation in the workshops is free, but attendees are responsible for arranging their own transportation, lodging and meals unless otherwise indicated in workshop details.  

 

Place:

Utah’s Hogle Zoo

2600 E Sunnyside Ave.

Salt Lake City, UT 84414

 

Primary Contacts:  

Chris Schmitz (cschmitz@hoglezoo.org)

Kelly Gallo (kgallo@hoglezoo.org)

Bruce Moravchik (bruce.moravchik@noaa.gov)

 

Featured Presentations

  • Dr. Robert Gillis, Director/State Climatologist, Utah Climate Center, Utah State University

  • Dr. Robin Kundas Craig, Professor, College Of Law, University of Utah; Affiliated Faculty, Global Change & Sustainability Center, University of Utah

  • Dr. Jim Steenburgh, University of Utah Professor, Author: The Greatest Snow on Earth and Blog: Wasatch Weather Weenies

  • Mathew Bekker, BYU Professor specializing in Utah drought and dendrochronology

  • Brian McInerney, Senior Hydrologist, NOAA’s National Weather Service

  • Nancy Mesner, Professor, Watershed Services, Utah State University

  • Natalie Little, PE, Regional Sustainability and Climate Change Coordinator, Forest Service, Intermountain Regional Office

  • Mike Golden, Research Biologist, Dixie National Forest, US Forest Service

 

Hands-on Activities from:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Westminster College-Great Salt Lake Institute, Utah’s Hogle Zoo, HawkWatch International, Red Butte Garden, Natural History Museum of Utah, Clark Planetarium, Thanksgiving Point, US Forest Service, National Phenology Project, The Community Collaborative Rain Hail and Snow Network, Utah Water Watch, Utah State University Extension

 

Tours:

Utah State University’s Climate Center, The Great Salt Lake, Wasatch Mountains, Clark Planetarium, Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge, Red Butte Garden, Natural History Museum, Utah’s Hogle Zoo, Optional Field Trip (Friday, June 17- to Peter Sinks)

 

Notes - Workshop Costs, Food & Lodging:

  • This workshop has a capacity for 50 participants.

  • There is no cost to attend this workshop.

  • Participants must make their own travel and overnight arrangements.

  • A nearby lodging option Hampton Inn Suites Salt Lake City/University Foothill Drive 1345 S. Foothill Drive, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84108, USA (801- 583-3500) A block of rooms has been set aside. Ask for the Utah’s Hogle Zoo rate/room block. (http://goo.gl/vZuuh9)

  • A free van service to/from Hampton Inn to Hogle Zoo will be provided

  • Lunch, snacks and at least one dinner will be provided.

  • Transportation to/from workshop related events will be provided.

 

Vicki Arthur will lead participants through a wide range of education resources from the U.S. Forest Service for teaching about climate change. Forest Service researchers have been observing and studying the effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems for over 30 years. Learn how your students can collect and enter tree data to quantify and put a dollar value on the services that your school yard trees provide.  Discover an interactive atlas where students can learn about computer modeling while observing the potential effects of different emissions scenarios on the ranges of birds and trees. 

Thursday, March 26th - 3:30-4:45pm MT/4:30pm CT/5:30pm ET

The National Climate Assessment, released in May of 2014, summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, touching on many disciplines: earth science, biology, human health, engineering, technology, economics, and policy. Explore the document with a lead NCA author, then learn about related educator resources with Kristen Poppleton from the Will Steger Foundation. Discover how to bring these resources into classroom lessons, engage students in data collection and analysis, share visualizations and citizen science projects. Focus this month will be on the Great Plains region.  Watch for additional regions to be featured in upcoming “Ask US” sessions.

 

Dates & Times: Tuesday and Wednesday, June 21st and 22nd, 2016 from 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM CT

 

NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project (CSEP) is collaborating with Federal, State and NGO partners to convene four climate-science workshops for formal and informal educators. Participants will hear from and interact with climate science, education and communication experts, and visit research facilities to explore foundational technologies and innovations in Earth-system research. This workshop in New Orleans, Louisiana will focus on the region and topical impacts of climate change, with a goal of connecting educators and their students/audiences to the best-available, science-based information and resources about climate change.

Registration for the New Orleans, Louisiana workshop is open, however there are attendance limits for the workshop, and we are advertising them nationally.  Availability will be on a first come first serve basis, so register early for your workshop. Participation in the workshops is free, but attendees are responsible for arranging their own transportation, lodging and meals unless otherwise indicated in workshop details.  

Place:

Audubon Aquarium of the Americas

1 Canal St, New Orleans, LA 70130

(504) 565-3033

 

Primary Contacts:

Tricia LeBlanc (tleblanc@auduboninstitute.org, 504-378- 2675)

Molly Harrison (Molly.Harrison@noaa.gov)

Bruce Moravchik (Bruce.Moravchik@noaa.gov)  

 

Featured Presentations and Activities:

  • Examining Mud Cores to Look at Changes in Climate in the Gulf

  • Gulf Fisheries and Climate Change

  • Climate Change Communication and Climate Change for Young Learners

  • Ways to Engage Local Audiences to Take Action

  • Coastal Land and Land Loss Activities

  • Hands-on activities about climate change in the Gulf

  • Screening of Hurricane on the Bayou with followed by Q and A with scientists

 

Notes - Workshop Costs, Food & Lodging:

  • There is no cost to attend this workshop.

  • Participants must make their own travel and overnight arrangements.

  • Coffee and lunch will be provided by the aquarium both workshop days.

This e-workshop developed by the FrameWorks Institute in partnership with the New England Aquarium gives an introductory look at how interpreters can utilize Strategic Framing to more effectively communicate the ocean and climate change story with the public. If you are interested in learning more about how to use Strategic Framing at your institution consider applying to a NNOCCI Study Circle. See the New England Aquarium's partner page for more information.

This workshop functions best in a modern Web browser that supports HTML5. We recommend Google ChromeFireFoxSafari, or IE9.

The National Climate Assessment, released in May of 2014, summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, touching on many disciplines: earth science, biology, human health, engineering, technology, economics, and policy. Explore the document with lead NCA author, Sarah Trainor, then learn about related educator resources with Jessica Brunacini from the PoLAR Partnership.

Discover how to bring these resources into classroom lessons, engage students in data collection and analysis, share visualizations and citizen science projects. 

Focus this month will be on the Alaska region. Watch for additional regions to be featured in upcoming “Ask US” sessions.

Also explore the NCA Education Resources for the Alaska Region to help to unpack the key messages of the region and point to related, high-quality online resources.

Dates: Thu, June 30th (8:00 - 5:30); Fri, July 1st (8 - 7:30pm); Sat, Jul 2nd (9am - 12pm) MT

 

NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project (CSEP) is collaborating with Federal, State and NGO partners to convene four climate-science workshops for formal and informal educators. Participants will hear from and interact with climate science, education and communication experts, and visit research facilities to explore foundational technologies and innovations in Earth-system research. This workshop in Boulder, Colorado will focus on the region and topical impacts of climate change, with a goal of connecting educators and their students/audiences to the best-available, science-based information and resources about climate change.

Registration for the Boulder, Colorado workshop is open, however there are attendance limits for the workshop, and we are advertising them nationally.  Availability will be on a first come first serve basis, so register early for your workshop. Participation in the workshops is free, but attendees are responsible for arranging their own transportation, lodging and meals unless otherwise indicated in workshop details.

 

Place:

National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)/University Center for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) Mesa Laboratory

1850 Table Mesa Drive.

Boulder, Colorado 80305

303.497.1000

 

Important Note:

If you are a foreign national and wish to attend this workshop, you MUST note it in your registration and send an email to: Teresa Eastburn, eastburn@ucar.edu

 

Primary Contacts:  

Teresa Eastburn, eastburn@ucar.edu

Peg Steffen, Peg.Steffen@noaa.gov

 

Featured Presentations:

  • Discussions with world renowned climate scientists Kevin Trenbeth, Gerald Meehl and others involving weather extremes, risks, and resilience.

 

Featured Activities:

  • Computer-based Science on a Sphere Explorer;

  • Tour of City of Boulder "Graceful Failure" engineering design w/ meteorologists Matt Kelsch;

  • Bringing modeling to life and why determining local climate and weather extremes can be challenging;

  • Tools to bring engineering for climate extremes and resilience into the classroom involving: fire, drought, floods, and more.

 

Notes on Food & Lodging:

  • There is no cost to attend this workshop.

  • Participants must make their own travel and overnight arrangements.

  • Meals will not be provided, but participants will be informed of the numerous dining options.

  • Nearby Hotel cost (reserved presently for attendees who are interested) is $89/night - Roadway Inn and Suites. 555 30th Street, Boulder, CO 303/444-3330

 

Explore the science of climate change, and how scientists study climate and make predictions using modeling. This NASA-funded course will take place over three weeks, both online and onsite at AMNH, and will be co-taught by Museum educators and climate scientists.

Funding is provided by NASA's Global Climate Change Education Program under Grant Number NNX10AB59A.

NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project (CSEP) is collaborating with Federal, State and NGO partners to convene four climate-science workshops for formal and informal educators. Participants will hear from and interact with climate science, education and communication experts, and visit research facilities to explore foundational technologies and innovations in Earth-system research. This workshop in Silver Spring, Maryland will focus on the region and topical impacts of climate change, with a goal of connecting educators and their students/audiences to the best-available, science-based information and resources about climate change.

Register for the Silver Spring, Maryland workshop is open, however there are attendance limits for the workshop, and we are advertising them nationally.  Availability will be on a first come first serve basis, so register early for your workshop. Participation in the workshops is free, but attendees are responsible for arranging their own transportation, lodging and meals unless otherwise indicated in workshop details.  

All attendees will receive a certificate acknowledging their participation in the workshop as well as the number of professional development hours they have engaged in.  

Below are the location, date, location, and attendance limits for the upcoming workshop. Registration forms will be shut down when registration for that workshop has reached capacity. You will receive an email confirming your participation in the workshop. Attendance limits for the workshop is 100 educators.

Important Note: If you are a foreign national and wish to attend the workshops in Silver Spring, MD you MUST send an email to Peg Steffen, Peg.Steffen@noaa.gov

 

Climate Education Workshop: Detailed Information

Silver Spring, Maryland

Dates & Times: 

Wednesday, August 5th, 2015 8:00 am-4:30pm

 

Place: 

NOAA Science Center

1305 East West Highway

Silver Spring, MD 20910 

 

Important Note:

If you are a foreign national and wish to attend this workshop, you MUST note it in your registration and send an email to: Peg Steffen, Peg.Steffen@noaa.gov

 

Primary Contacts:  

Peg Steffen, Peg.Steffen@noaa.gov

Bruce Moravchik, Bruce.moravchik@noaa.gov

 

Featured Presentations:

  • An introduction to global climate models, including a user friendly version that can be run on a desktop computer, allowing students to explore the subject of climate change in the same way that research scientists do. 
  • Simulations and Activities for Modeling planetary energy balance, tree rings, paleoclimates, the greenhouse effect, climate sensitivity and future climate projection.
  • Climate change poses some formidable communication and education challenges, as well as opportunities.  Simulation-based role-playing games offer a growing opportunity to provide powerful educational experiences.

 

Featured Activities:

  • Hands-On with NOAA’s Science on a Sphere, and new flat screen app!
  • Explore the drivers for change in sea level in a new app that includes a question-driven tour and an exploration of data that scientists collect.
  • Hands-On Activities and Simple Computer-based Simulations for Climate Modeling Education
  • SMARTIC role playing simulation for Polar regions based on the U.S. Navy Fleet Arctic Operation Game.
  • Carbon Journeys simulation for students and a new Risk Reduction Simulation for coastal hazards that encourages thinking about uncertainty.  
  • Design your own transition to a low-carbon global economy with the En-ROADS simulation

 

Notes on Food & Lodging:

  • There is no cost to attend this workshop.
  • Participants must make their own travel and overnight arrangements.
  • Meals will not be provided, but participants will be informed of the numerous and inexpensive dining options in walking distance.

 

For questions concerning the workshop including location and program questions, contact the workshop lead:

Silver Spring, MD - peg.steffen@noaa.gov 

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This workshop is part of the White House Climate Education and Literacy Initiative

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