Learn about integrating climate change education into your classroom or informal education programming, get an introduction to regionally relevant climate science, and hear about how other educators have used these materials. The webinar will be presented by educators who have used the resources in their own teaching, both in the classroom and in place-based education.

Certificates of attendance for professional development contact hours can be requested after the webinar; instructions will be provided during the session.

The presentation will cover:

  • Ohio Sea Grant’s updated Great Lakes Climate Change Curriculum
  • climate and Great Lakes literacy principles
  • informal resources to supplement and expand lesson plans

April 17, 2014, at 4 p.m. EDT

From proxy data to direct observations, all signs point to the same conclusion: Earth's climate system is warming at an unprecedented rate. Join presenter Margaret Mooney from the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies to learn more about how scientists measure and document warming trends along with tools to teach this topic to your students.

Certificates of professional development hours are available upon request. Additional session dates will be announced soon.

"Ask NICE" Online Professional Development Series

Join the NASA Innovations in Climate Education, or NICE, team for the final webinar of the 2013-14 school year in their series of Google Plus Hangout professional development sessions. Extended workshops will be held over the summer with those who have participated in the series. A new series of online Ask NICE sessions will begin in the fall.

For more information, visit https://nice.larc.nasa.gov/asknice/ or http://dln.nasa.gov. Questions about this series should be sent to Bonnie Murray at bonnie.murray@nasa.gov.

Monday, October 5th at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

 

To view an archive of the broadcast, go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tv7_wm6ru4M&feature=youtu.be

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project is proud to welcome Dr. Alexander E. “Sandy” MacDonald as the featured speaker for our October webinar. Dr. MacDonald is Director of NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory, and the Chief Science Advisor for NOAA Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

Dr. Alexander will discuss a national energy simulator developed by a team at NOAA that uses highly detailed weather and electric load data to determine the role that various energy sources could play in the coming decades. This “energy system simulator” can use any source of energy (coal, nuclear, wind, solar etc.) over the US 48 states, and includes a potential national High-Voltage-Direct-Current transmission network, allowing power to be shared over the domain. The simulator identifies cost-minimized geographic configurations of power plants that could continuously and reliably supply electricity over all parts of the country. 

A 2030 simulation that limits carbon emission intensity to levels found in today’s natural gas power plants, and includes a national HVDC network, would lower US electric sector emissions by up to 80%, keeping costs about the same as today. The transportation and heating and air conditioning sectors will need to have much higher levels of electric usage to realize the full potential of decarbonizing energy. The studies carried out by Dr. Alexander’s team show that this approach is feasible for the major world carbon emitters, including the US, China and Europe. There is a potential path to transforming the global energy system to much lower carbon emissions by the 2030s without major economic harm. 


Cost Optimized Realization of the US Power Generation System in 2013

 

Please share this opportunity will ALL interested colleagues and networks.

Important Information for participating in this Webinar.Seriously, read the following and save it for reference: 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial +1 (213) 929-4231 for audio. The access code is: 240-647-211. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to:http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 106-768-091

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to our Listserv at: 

https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/noaaclimatestewards/

        

 

6-7:00pm ET/3-4:00pm PT

The GLOBE Program  originally developed posters and activities for teachers to help students explore the concepts of Earth as a system, find patterns and connections between and among maps containing different environmental data, and to understand the relationship between time and space in regard to global environmental data.

In 2014, a digital GLOBE Earth system ePoster is now provided by the MY NASA DATA project to extend the opportunities for learning. This digital poster provides data for 2005 through 2013 and enables interactive exploration of the data in more detail through the use of animations. The animations can be used with students to find patterns among different environmental data, understand the relationship among different environmental parameters, and understand how the data changes seasonally and over longer time scales.

In this interactive educator webinar, Tina Harte, education specialist at NASA Langley Research Center and former middle school science teacher, will explore the ePoster and activities will be discussed for K-12 students, with a focus on those meeting NGSS performance expectations, science practices and cross-cutting concepts related to Earth System Science.

This course explores the science of climate change. Students will learn how the climate system works; what factors cause climate to change across different time scales and how those factors interact; how climate has changed in the past; how scientists use models, observations and theory to make predictions about future climate; and the possible consequences of climate change for our planet. The course explores evidence for changes in ocean temperature, sea level and acidity due to global warming. Students will learn how climate change today is different from past climate cycles and how satellites and other technologies are revealing the global signals of a changing climate. Finally, the course looks at the connection between human activity and the current warming trend and considers some of the potential social, economic and environmental consequences of climate change.

The International Academy of the Digital Arts & Sciences has chosen NOAA Climate.gov as one of five nominees for the annual Webby Awards for online excellence. We’re nominated in both the 'Government' and 'Green' categories. If you're a fan of our site, please consider voting for us in those categories.

Voting is open from now until April 24. You do have to register/login, but you can use your Facebook, Google, or Twitter logins, or an email address with no additional personal info.

Vote for Climate.gov in the Government category.

Vote for the "Teaching Climate" section in the Green category.

The Webby Awards is the Internet's most respected symbol of success (much like a Grammy or an Oscar), so it's an honor just to be nominated. Out of the millions of sites, videos, ads, and mobile apps in existence, and the tens of thousands that were submitted for consideration, only a handful of Nominees were selected by the Academy for The 18th Annual Webby Awards. 

If you are a regular visitor to the Teaching Climate section of NOAA Climate.gov, you are most likely familiar with our reviewed resources, videos, and professional development events. But those are just some of the features that NOAA Climate.gov has to offer.

Across our website's four main sections, we promote public understanding of climate science and climate-related events, to make our data products and services easy to access and use, to provide climate-related support to the private sector and the Nation’s economy, and to serve people making climate-related decisions with tools and resources that help them answer specific questions.

NOAA Climate.gov is a team effort.  It would not be possible to produce and publish the site without contributions from more than a dozen personnel from across NOAA and from among our valued partners. And, most especially, our nomination wouldn't have been possible without the work of NOAA's and its partners' world-class climate science research, data products, and services that are routinely featured in the site.  

We would greatly appreciate your support, and hope you keep visiting us! 

Vote for NOAA Climate.gov in the Government category.

Vote for NOAA Climate.gov's "Teaching Climate" section in the Green category.

 

​Please join the NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project on Tuesday, November 3rd at 7:30 pmEastern Time

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project is Pleased to welcome Ms. Tarlise "Tarlie" Townsend from the University of Michigan Ford School of Public Policy as the featured speaker for our November webinar. 

Does uncertainty about the impacts of climate change suggests that scientists aren’t sure climate change is even happening? Or, perhaps, that we should wait to take mitigation or resilience actions until further research reduces that uncertainty? These are a few of the questions students might raise about the uncertainty in climate change predictions. Ms. Townsend will address them in part one of her presentation, discussing the sources of uncertainty in climate projections, what uncertainty means for scientific consensus, and how it can actually be harnessed to make better mitigation and resilience decisions. 

One takeaway will be that effective use of uncertainty information requires close attention to what’s communicated by the media, scientists, and interest groups. In the second part of her presentation, Ms. Townsend will point out common strategies for framing risk and uncertainty information, highlighting ways that students can be smart information consumers to avoid being misled. 

 

Please share this opportunity will ALL interested colleagues and networks.

Important Information for participating in this Webinar.Seriously, read the following and save it for reference: 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial +1 (646) 307-1719 for audio. The access code is: 336-623-352. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 111-626-755

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to our Web page

 

4:00pm-5:00pm ET

Investigate the National Climate Assessment (or NCA) report during Earth Science Week with Research Scientist Alison Delgado on Wednesday, October 15, 2014 from 4-5pm ET. Get an in-depth view on how our climate is changing and what observations are telling us all in Spanish. Discover how to integrate the National Climate Assessment into your STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) classroom through NASA hands-on activities in Spanish. Engage students with NASA unique projects including how to use clouds, climate and weather through NASA’s Students’ Cloud Observations On-Line or S’COOL project. The entire session and lessons will be presented in Spanish.

For more information about this session please contact NASA Education Specialist Marilé Colón Robles at Marile.ColonRobles@nasa.gov

Presenters:

Alison Delgado, Research Scientist at the Joint Global Change Research Institute
Marilé Colón Robles, NASA Educator Professional Development Specialist at NASA Langley Research Center

About the Presenters:

Alison Delgado is a Research Scientist at the Joint Global Change Research Institute, a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Maryland at College Park. She is currently assigned to USGCRP for U.S. DOE where she is serving as Sector Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment. In that capacity, she is coordinating with government agencies, scientists, NGOs, academia and industry to develop the Third National Climate Assessment, particularly to assess impacts of climate change on sectors that include energy, agriculture and rural communities, forests, transportation and public health. She also supports the working group on Scenarios and Interpretive Science.

Marilé Colón Robles is a NASA Education Specialist at NASA Langley Research Center. She creates and teaches professional development workshops for pre-service and in-service teachers as well as informal educators all over the country, delivering these opportunities in both English and Spanish.

NASA STEM inmersa en español para el desarrollo profesional de educadores: la Evaluación Climática Nacional
Investigue los resultados de la Evaluación Climática Nacional (o NCA por sus siglas en inglés) durante la semana de la ciencias terrestres con científica de investigación Alison Delgado el miércoles, 15 de octubre, 2014 de 4-5pm ET. Obtenga un análisis detallado de cómo nuestro clima está cambiando y qué nos dicen las observaciones científicas. Descubre cómo integrar el reporte en tu salón de clase STEM a través de actividades interactivas de la NASA en español. Aprenda sobre proyectos de la NASA perfecto para estudiantes incluyendo cómo utilizar nubes, clima y el tiempo con el proyecto de observaciones de nubes estudiantiles de la NASA en línea, o S’COOL. Esta sesión será completamente en español.

Para obtener más información acerca de esta sesión contacte la especialista de educación de la NASA Marilé Colón Robles a Marile.ColonRobles@nasa.gov.

Presentadores:

Alison Delgado, científica de investigaciones en el Joint Global Change Research Institute

Marilé Colón Robles, especialista de desarrollo profesional para educadores de la NASA en el Centro de Investigaciones Langley de la NASA

Are you apprehensive teaching about climate change? Not sure what to believe after reading different headlines and hearing controversies? ClimateChangeLIVE will help you sort it out for yourself and be confident in educating your students about this important topic! This webinar will be presented by education specialists from three federal agencies immersed in climate change research and issues. We’ll be joined by EPA’s 2012 Climate Communicator of the Year, the Alliance for Climate Education (ACE). ACE will share tips about how to engage your students, and how your class can be part of the solution, addressing climate change head-on. We’ll feature highlights of materials focused on the process of science, how to judge whether what you’re reading is good science, as well as misconceptions about climate change. The Department of Energy will highlight the Energy Literacy Framework, which identifies the Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts one would understand to be energy and climate literate.

Presenters: U.S. Forest Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Dept. of Energy, Alliance for Climate Education

April 23rd at 6pm EDT (3pm PDT)

Ocean acidification is a complex phenomenon with profound consequences. Understanding complexity and the impact of ocean acidification requires systems thinking and collaboration, both in research and in education. Scientific advancement will help us better understand the problem and devise more effective solutions, but executing these solutions will require widespread public participation to mitigate this global problem. 

In an effort to help high school students understand today's science, the presenters have translated current systems-level ocean acidification research into a 5 week classroom module.  They will present this curriculum and provide guidance for easy implementation in high schools.  Thus far 13 different schools and over 1200 students have field tested this work – they have seen dramatic increases in engagement, and in students’ abilities to use inquiry and to challenge their mental models.  The lessons are hands-on, interdisciplinary, and specifically focus on systems thinking which has been shown to enable behavioral change.  

In this curriculum, students take on the roles of scientists and delegates as they investigate the consequences of the changing carbon cycle on the chemistry and biology of the oceans.  Students begin by critically assess different pieces of information through news articles and real-time data.  They combine their findings into a network diagram that interconnects key players of this system.  Students align themselves with stakeholders and design collaborative, cohesive experiments to test hypotheses and network properties.  They explore how carbon dioxide is produced as well as the consequences of increased CO2 levels on the pH of water, the integrity of seashells, and the life cycle of diatoms. In the culminating activity, students act as delegates when reconvening to discuss the systems consequences of ocean acidification. They make recommendations for further research, policy, and lifestyle changes.  

The module connects to other pertinent lessons being developed locally and globally and provides a clear connection to the Next Generation Science Standards and Ocean Literacy standards. 

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Space is limited.
Reserve your Webinar seat now at:
https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/229162946
After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

Following the presentation there will be a few short informational announcements relevant to the ocean acidfication communication community. Please forward this invitation to interested colleagues. We look forward to seeing you at this event!

More info on the series and upcoming webinars can be found here

This series is jointly sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries and Ocean Acidification Program.

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