Webinar 2: Tuesday, October 21 – 6:30 pm EST / 3:30 PST/ 12:30 HST (90 min)

Join us for the second of two webinars for an introduction to our newest NOAA Data in the Classroom curriculum module – Investigating Coral Bleaching Using Real Data. You'll hear from NOAA experts about coral bleaching and how scientists use remote sensing tools to study stresses on coral health. The NODE curriculum developers will introduce the new lesson plans and demonstrate how our unique scaffolding can help students develop skills to access and use online data.

The NOAA Data in the Classroom Project develops curriculum designed to help teachers and students use real scientific data to explore dynamic Earth processes and understand the impact of environmental events on a regional or global scale. Each curriculum module features easy-to-use curriculum materials and specially designed websites that enable students to access and use real data. Our newest curriculum module – Investigating Coral Bleaching Using Real Data – is being developed for grades 6-8.

  • Guided walk-thru of curriculum lesson plans
  • Building students' capabilities using real data
  • Using NGSS, Disciplinary Core Ideas, and Cross Cutting Concepts
  • Climate Literacy and Coral Bleaching

Presented by: Second Nature in partnership with the American Meteorological Society (AMS)

Join AMS & Second Nature for a webinar aimed at promoting the importance of basic climate science education at Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs).

This webinar will provide an overview of:
• The AMS Climate Studies Diversity Project, its eligibility requirements and application process 
• Previous Diversity Project participants’ experiences, and opportunities for Minority-Serving Institutions
• How to integrate the AMS Climate Studies Diversity Project and the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) for campus sustainability planning 

Panelists:
• James Brey – Director, AMS Education Program 
• Jason Szymanski – Professor of Chemistry & Geosciences, Monroe Community College 
• John Warford– Professor of Geography, Florida Agricultural & Mechanical University 
• Van Du – ACUPCC Program Manager, Second Nature 

 

Funded by NSF

March 12, 2014
Time: LIVE from 1 - 2 p.m. Eastern Time
Archive available after March 12

This program will feature:

  • LIVE interactive conversation about climate change with experts
  • Send us your tweets, post on Facebook, or send an e-mail to climate change experts

For links and resources mentioned in the webcast are posted on the ClimateChangeLive page.

Monday, October 3 at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project is pleased to welcome Dr. Lori Kumler, Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Studies at the University of Mount Union; and Dr. Bethany Vosburg-Bluem, Professor of Social Studies and Teacher Education at Otterbein University as our featured speakers this month.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Drs. Kumler and Vosburg-Bluem will focus on why teaching about climate change is so often limited to the natural science context. They suggest that learning about climate change from a social science context provides new opportunities to engage learners. For example, you might have learners address the question of why climate change is such a hot potato political topic. Students can examine documents such as national political party platforms, candidate speeches, and media articles to address this question. Within the social sciences learners can also examine the historical implications of how we came to this global tipping point and how we can use the past to more critically examine our current and future decisions and actions. What is OUR role as environmental citizens both locally and globally? In this webinar, they will address reasons why and how you can approach climate change using politics, geography, economics, or history. They will also discuss how the social sciences provide useful insights into student participation beyond typical approaches such as individual tree planting, changing transportation modes, or installing energy efficient devices.

For more background on Drs. Kumler and Vosburg-Bluem thoughts in this area, read their article Climate Change in the Social Studies Classroom: A "Why" and "How" Guide Using the C3 Framework.

Important Information for participating in this Webinar

  • We recommend you log into the webinar AT LEAST 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option to listen to this presentation. All participants will be muted for the duration of the broadcast.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial 1-(914)-614-3221for audio. The access code is: 446-740-424. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 893-397-379

Visit the NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project Web page for more information

Sign up to the Listserv to receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities.

Monday, February 1st at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

Getting Real: Health in the Teaching of Climate and Earth Science
 

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project welcomes Dr. John M. Balbus, M.D., M.P.H., Senior Advisor for Public Health to the Director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences as our featured speaker this month.

Presentation Abstract: 

The impacts on health of climate change as well as the societal responses to climate change are varied and significant. In the past five years, recognition of the importance of the health implications of climate change has grown enormously, from major reports in the premier international medical journal Lancet to messaging from the President about the US Clean Power Plant rule and Climate Action Plan. Understanding how climate change and climate variability affect people’s health and well being is a foundational aspect of basic climate literacy. For teachers, integrating content and exercises on health provides an opportunity to engage students in earth science with projects that both demonstrate the relevance of the science and also require development of critical analytic and synthetic skills. Health content related to climate change can also augment curricula in the social sciences, history, literature, and the visual arts. This talk will summarize the health implications of climate change and encourage discussion of how health content can help teachers achieve their educational goals. 
 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial 1-(914)-614-3221 for audio. The access code is: 367-785-127. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 145-578-259

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to our Web page

 

Gain the tools needed to quickly ramp up to the Next Generation Science Standards* in a workshop that combines climate science, systems thinking, and science communications skills through media production. Tackle your media anxieties and tap into the excitement around media production, using easy-to-use lesson plans that bring student media production into any instructional environment.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: Friday, March 1, 2013

This course explores the science of climate change. Students will learn how the climate system works; what factors cause climate to change across different time scales and how those factors interact; how climate has changed in the past; how scientists use models, observations and theory to make predictions about future climate; and the possible consequences of climate change for our planet. The course explores evidence for changes in ocean temperature, sea level and acidity due to global warming. Students will learn how climate change today is different from past climate cycles and how satellites and other technologies are revealing the global signals of a changing climate. Finally, the course looks at the connection between human activity and the current warming trend and considers some of the potential social, economic and environmental consequences of climate change.

 

Authoring Scientists

Ed Mathez, Geologist

Gavin Schmidt, Climatologist
 
Drew Shindell, Climatologist

 

Key Science Concepts

The Sun is the primary source of energy for Earth's climate system. The Earth's energy is in balance, or equilibrium, when Earth emits the same amount of energy as it absorbs.

The climate system is dynamic and has many interrelated components. A change in any one component can influence the equilibrium of the system and result in climate changes.

Climate varies over space and time through both natural and human sources. These forces operate over time periods ranging from years to hundreds of millions or even billions of years and vary widely with location on Earth.

Human activities – particularly the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide since the Industrial Revolution – are affecting the climate system today, leading to warming temperatures globally.

Evidence for variations in past climates is held in ocean and lake sediments, ice cores, corals, tree rings, and other geologic records. Understanding past climate informs us about how the present climate system works and how it might change in the future.

Climate change will have consequences for the Earth system including human society. Climate change research involves extensive observations, theory and modeling. Future climate change scenarios are essential to informing efforts to mitigate and to adapt to the consequences of climate change.

Graduate Credit

This course is approved for graduate credit and continuing education units from leading institutions at an additional cost.

 

 

NSTA continues to explore the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) by presenting a web seminar series focusing on the disciplinary core ideas. The spring series features four informative and interactive web seminars on life science and engineering design. Visit the web seminar series page to access archives of web seminars on physical science and Earth and space science.

The web seminar on the disciplinary core idea of Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics addresses questions such as "How do organisms interact with the living and nonliving environments to obtain matter and energy?" and "How do matter and energy move through an ecosystem?"

This web seminar will provide guidance on:

  • which concepts are central to understanding ecosystems
  • how students' understanding of ecosystems might progress over their K-12 education
  • how students can engage in the scientific and engineering practices to gain an understanding of these ideas
  • what instruction might look like in the classroom

 

Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenters: Andy Anderson and Jennifer Doherty

 

This program featured:

  • Presentation by the award-winning Alliance for Climate Education (ACE)
  • Student moderators and panel discussions
  • Videos of student-led projects from across the country
  • Student perspectives that will lead to the conversation in the second webcast

A recording is available.

This month's webinar will build on the theme of Earth's Energy Budget with an investigation into clouds and their role in Earth's climate system. Participants will learn about resources from the Students' Cloud Observations On-Line, or S'COOL, program that allows students to practice cloud identification and submit observations to NASA as citizen scientists. Participants will also take a closer look at posters and interactive features created using data from the CERES instrument that is aboard a variety of NASA satellites.

Certificates of professional development hours are available upon request. Additional session dates will be announced soon.

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