This video reviews how photovoltaic (PV) cells work, noting that technological innovations are decreasing costs and allowing PV use to expand.

In this video the Pentagon's focus on climate change is described as a significant factor as the military examines potential risks, strategic responses, and impacts of climate change on future military and humanitarian missions. In 2010, for the first time, the Pentagon focused on climate change as a significant factor in its Quadrennial Defense Review of potential risks and strategic responses. Rear Admiral David Titley, Oceanographer of the Navy, explains why the US military sees clear evidence of climate change and how those changes will affect future military and humanitarian missions.

This video follows biologist Gretchen Hofmann as she studies the effects of ocean acidification on sea urchin larvae.

In this activity, students learn about the urban heat island effect by investigating which areas of their schoolyard have higher temperatures - trees, grass, asphalt, and other materials. Based on their results, they hypothesize how concentrations of surfaces that absorb heat might affect the temperature in cities - the urban heat island effect. Then they analyze data about the history of Los Angeles heat waves and look for patterns in the Los Angeles climate data and explore patterns.

Coral Reefs in Hot Water is a short video displaying computerized data collected on the number of reefs impacted by coral bleaching around the world.

This lesson is comprised of three activities (three class periods). Students use web-based animations to explore the impacts of ice melt and changes to sea level. Students are introduced to topographic maps by doing a hands-on activity to model the contours of an island. Students examine the relationship between topography and sea level change by mapping changing shorelines using a topographic map.

This three-part, hands-on investigation explores how sunlight's angle of incidence at Earth's surface impacts the amount of solar radiation received in a given area. The activity is supported by PowerPoint slides and background information.

This video focuses on the conifer forest in Alaska to explore the carbon cycle and how the forest responds to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide. Topics addressed in the video include wildfires, reflectivity, and the role of permafrost in the global carbon cycle.


Education and communication are among the most powerful tools the nation has to bring hidden hazards to public attention, understanding, and action.

Informing an Effective Response to Climate Change, NRC (2010)

Bumble bees, extreme weather events, sea ice loss, and drought. The impacts of climate change are being felt by communities and creatures across our nation—and world. The Forum on Digital Media for STEM Learning: Climate Education will explore how the stories and science behind these impacts are increasingly being integrated into classroom instruction and STEM education contexts, with a focus on digital media. Held at WGBH’s Brighton studio on Monday, November 9, 2015, this highly-interactive and fast-paced event will examine emerging narratives in climate education, digital media tools and products that show unique potential for educational settings, and promising modes of engagement for students, teachers and schools.


Please explore the program and line-up of presenters. Click here to find out how to watch the Forum live.

LIVE STREAM timing for each strand:
9:15  - 11 AM ET Strand 1: Standards and Storylines 
11:30 AM – 1:15 PM ET Strand 2: Emerging Platforms and Products 
2 – 3 PM ET Strand 3: New Modes of Engagement

A note about the Program Design of the Forum event:

This Forum event is designed for both live, in-person audiences, as well as viewers who wish to watch and interact via online streaming and social media. The three topic strands have been developed around the content, technology and pedagogy of Climate Education, and reference the TPCK model for professional learning. Strands provide a blend of theory and practice, with anchoring keynote presentations that are followed by shorter “case study” presentations that offer early findings and emergent research. Each strand concludes with a hosted panel discussion with in-studio and online audiences.

These strands are followed by an attendee-driven “unconference,” where participants discuss and develop ways to implement some of the ideas from the panels that had resonated with them. Attendees of the 2014 Forum event reported that the “unconference” session, and additional networking opportunities, provide a real “value-add” for in-person attendance. A dedicated online community space containing tools and resources will continue to be accessible along with the work products from the Forum events, laying the foundation for a larger community of practice for sharing best practices and lessons learned.

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) brings considerably more attention to climate and climate change than earlier curriculum standards. The session will explore what and how to teach climate in ways connected to NGSS's three dimensions: (science and engineering practices, cross-cutting themes, and disciplinary core ideas (DCIs)), especially the most connected DCI: Human Impacts. We welcome abstracts addressing innovative roles for scientists assisting educators, student engagement with real data, materials and approaches that attend to the climate-energy connection; exemplary curricular materials, successful out-of-school programs, and strategies for dealing with anti-science sentiments.

The live streams will begin 15 minutes before the session times. View the full program. Note: All times are in PST.