Thu, Jul 14, 2016 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM EDT

Heading into the middle of summer, temperatures are starting to heat up. As the temperatures rise, the risk of heat-related climate impacts also grows. CUSP (Climate & Urban Systems Partnership) climate scientists will provide an update on the summer forecast, providing insight on just how hot it may be over the next several weeks. They will also identify vulnerable population groups within our urban environments and the types of impacts that may occur during extreme heat events, which are projected to become more frequent and intense in the future with climate change. Also joining us will be CUSP partners from the Philadelphia Department of Public Health who will discuss their community engagement plans around the topic of climate change and health. Hope you can attend for a lively discussion!

Monday, October 5th at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

 

To view an archive of the broadcast, go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tv7_wm6ru4M&feature=youtu.be

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project is proud to welcome Dr. Alexander E. “Sandy” MacDonald as the featured speaker for our October webinar. Dr. MacDonald is Director of NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory, and the Chief Science Advisor for NOAA Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

Dr. Alexander will discuss a national energy simulator developed by a team at NOAA that uses highly detailed weather and electric load data to determine the role that various energy sources could play in the coming decades. This “energy system simulator” can use any source of energy (coal, nuclear, wind, solar etc.) over the US 48 states, and includes a potential national High-Voltage-Direct-Current transmission network, allowing power to be shared over the domain. The simulator identifies cost-minimized geographic configurations of power plants that could continuously and reliably supply electricity over all parts of the country. 

A 2030 simulation that limits carbon emission intensity to levels found in today’s natural gas power plants, and includes a national HVDC network, would lower US electric sector emissions by up to 80%, keeping costs about the same as today. The transportation and heating and air conditioning sectors will need to have much higher levels of electric usage to realize the full potential of decarbonizing energy. The studies carried out by Dr. Alexander’s team show that this approach is feasible for the major world carbon emitters, including the US, China and Europe. There is a potential path to transforming the global energy system to much lower carbon emissions by the 2030s without major economic harm. 


Cost Optimized Realization of the US Power Generation System in 2013

 

Please share this opportunity will ALL interested colleagues and networks.

Important Information for participating in this Webinar.Seriously, read the following and save it for reference: 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial +1 (213) 929-4231 for audio. The access code is: 240-647-211. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to:http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 106-768-091

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to our Listserv at: 

https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/noaaclimatestewards/

        

 

Monday, September 8, 2014 at 7:30 Eastern Time

Mark McCaffrey, Director of Collaborative Partnerships at the National Center for Science Education, is the featured speaker this month for the Climate Stewards project. He will address the questions: How can we best provide learners with authentic data and current research into climate changes that are already occurring in the United States? What is the National ClimateAssessment and how can I use its resources in my classroom? What are some of the best online resources for teaching about climate challenges and energy responses, and how do they tie to the Next Generation Science Standards? In his presentation, Mark will provide an overview of the learning pathways developed for educators that help them unpack the National Climate Assessment. He will also highlight insights for educators from his book Climate Smart & Energy Wise including how to address doubt, denial and despair when teaching about these challenging topics. 

Following Mark's presentation, Cindy Schmidt, Director of NCAR's Climate Voices Science Speakers Network will provide an overview of the project which works bring climate scientists directly in touch with students and members of the community to discuss the local effects of a changing climate and possible ways to address impacts.

Please forward this invitation to all interested colleagues and networks

The Fine Print: Important Notes for participating in the Webinar

  • Plan to log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software and we want to be sure you are able to access the meeting at the assigned start time.    
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this Webinar. If you elect to use the phone number provided for audio +1 (951) 266-6126, access code: 546-482-116, you will be charged for a long distance call. You do not need an Audio Pin number to listen to the meeting.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 851-182-978

Plan to join us for a day of learning and sharing about climate change and climate change education. What do we know about how people learn about climate change? Learn about the most effective strategies to help others make informed decisions. Hear from experts about the outlook for the D.C. region. Discover resources that exist in our community that could help your program or project.

To apply: Please complete an application before February 13th, 2013

More information about CUSP can be found here.

Dr. Kathleen Tierney, Director of the CU Boulder’s Natural Hazards Center and Dr. Kevin Trenberth from the Climate Analysis Section at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) will join facilitators Dr. Anne Gold of CIRES and Deb Morrison of University Colorado Boulder in an interactive panel discussion. 

These experts will discuss how scientists can forecast where extreme events will occur and their severity. They will cover what communities and governments  can do to increase resiliency to extreme weather events and how the scientific community can help prepare citizens and government. 

Why is climate change such a polarizing topic? How can environmental educators address this loaded issue in their communities and programs? This course is for environmental education professionals interested in applying current research in climate change communication and psychology to their educational programs. Students will learn about recent research on climate change psychology and climate change communication and how concepts from these fields can be incorporated into EE programming. For the final assignment, students will incorporate what they have learned in a lesson or action plan for their organization. Alternately, students can write a short reflective essay on climate change education practices in their community or organization based on concepts covered in the course. 

NOTE: This course is not about about climate change science or impacts but rather about effective practices for communicating about climate change through environmental education programs. This course is designed with North American educators in mind, although we are accepting a limited number of international participants. 

Dates: 2016-09-06  to 2016-10-28 

Course Size: Limited to 100 Students

Estimated Workload: 3-4 hours per week

Course Facilitator: Anne Armstrong, Anne Ferguson, Marianne Krasny

​Please join the NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project on Tuesday, November 3rd at 7:30 pmEastern Time

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project is Pleased to welcome Ms. Tarlise "Tarlie" Townsend from the University of Michigan Ford School of Public Policy as the featured speaker for our November webinar. 

Does uncertainty about the impacts of climate change suggests that scientists aren’t sure climate change is even happening? Or, perhaps, that we should wait to take mitigation or resilience actions until further research reduces that uncertainty? These are a few of the questions students might raise about the uncertainty in climate change predictions. Ms. Townsend will address them in part one of her presentation, discussing the sources of uncertainty in climate projections, what uncertainty means for scientific consensus, and how it can actually be harnessed to make better mitigation and resilience decisions. 

One takeaway will be that effective use of uncertainty information requires close attention to what’s communicated by the media, scientists, and interest groups. In the second part of her presentation, Ms. Townsend will point out common strategies for framing risk and uncertainty information, highlighting ways that students can be smart information consumers to avoid being misled. 

 

Please share this opportunity will ALL interested colleagues and networks.

Important Information for participating in this Webinar.Seriously, read the following and save it for reference: 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial +1 (646) 307-1719 for audio. The access code is: 336-623-352. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 111-626-755

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to our Web page

 

October 6, 2014 at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

Our Featured speaker is Dr. Richard Alley, Evan Pugh Professor of Geosciences and Associate of the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute at The Pennsylvania State University. He will be giving our main presentation Bungy Jumping off the Ice-Core Roller Coaster: Ice-Core Records of Global Warming and Abrupt Climate Change

Dr. Alley will discuss how ice cores provide remarkably accurate records of climate changes locally, regionally and globally. Ice-core records of ice age cycles contribute to our understanding that CO2 has been “the biggest control knob” of Earth’s overall climate, and thus that if we continue burning fossil fuels and releasing the CO2, we will have large impacts on climate. But, ice-core records also show how changes in ocean circulation have had large, rapid regional impacts. The existence of such abrupt climate changes contributes to our understanding that, if scientists are wrong about the influence of CO2 on climate, changes are likely to be more-damaging than expected rather than less-damaging. 

Please forward this invitation to all interested colleagues and networks

 

Turn on your teaching with the 2013 Summer Institute for Energy Education. Made possible by generous support from MN Center for Energy and the Environment.

 

Whether you teach STEM, art or anything in between, energy efficiency, conservation and renewables are present and future solutions that can be integrated into your school and teaching.

Every participant has the opportunity to earn CEU credits and graduate credits from Hamline University.

 

Josh Sniedeman is this year’s Department of Energy’s Einstein Science Educator Fellow.  He will introduce the Energy Literacy Essential Principles developed with the goal of building an energy literate public. In addition, we will introduce the Will Steger Foundation’s Experience Energy Curriculum and Mike Arquin, founder of Kidwind will demonstrate one of Kidwind’s many great activities.

 

 

Josh Sniedeman Josh Sniedeman is the current Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow for the Department of Energy – a distinction awarded to outstanding k-12 STEM educators. Sniedeman will be guiding us through an in-depth look at energy literacy and what it means for educators.
 


Michael ArquinMichael Arquin is the Founder and Director of KidWind, a leading resource for hands-on, classroom-friendly renewable energy projects. KidWind curricula and classroom wind-turbine kits are used by educators around the country and across many grade levels. Arquin will share with us some of their most-popular activities.
 
Attendees will also be introduced to Experience Energy, a curriculum developed by the Will Steger Foundation to engage elementary and middle school students in Minnesota energy literacy.

 

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