Presented by: Second Nature in partnership with the American Meteorological Society (AMS)

Join AMS & Second Nature for a webinar aimed at promoting the importance of basic climate science education at Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs).

This webinar will provide an overview of:
• The AMS Climate Studies Diversity Project, its eligibility requirements and application process 
• Previous Diversity Project participants’ experiences, and opportunities for Minority-Serving Institutions
• How to integrate the AMS Climate Studies Diversity Project and the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) for campus sustainability planning 

Panelists:
• James Brey – Director, AMS Education Program 
• Jason Szymanski – Professor of Chemistry & Geosciences, Monroe Community College 
• John Warford– Professor of Geography, Florida Agricultural & Mechanical University 
• Van Du – ACUPCC Program Manager, Second Nature 

 

Funded by NSF

January session: Thursday, Jan 15th- 4:30-5:45pm ET 

Although 97% of active climate scientists agree that the earth is warming due to human activities, some polls have found that only 44% of American share this view. As an educator, you are likely to encounter people who have received information that conflicts with the accepted climate science, perhaps from sources that they trust. This session will help you better understand American's perceptions of climate change and provide tips for better communicating climate science.

Click here on the day of the event to connect to the Ask US session. (You can access this page about 10 minutes before the start)

This event is a Google Hangout and will be broadcast live on YouTube. Questions may be submitted during the Hangout using the comments section or via Twitter –use  #AskUS

Online Educator Professional Development on Earth System Science Topics from ESTEEM (Earth Systems, Technology and Energy Education for MUREP –Minority University Research and Education Program)

 

Gain the tools needed to quickly ramp up to the Next Generation Science Standards* in a workshop that combines climate science, systems thinking, and science communications skills through media production. Tackle your media anxieties and tap into the excitement around media production, using easy-to-use lesson plans that bring student media production into any instructional environment.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: Friday, March 1, 2013

Date: Saturday, March 12, 2016
Time:
10 a.m. – 3 p.m. ET
9 a.m. – 2 p.m. CT
8 a.m. – 1 p.m. MT
7 a.m. – 12 p.m. PT

NSTA, in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), would like to invite you to attend the virtual conference titled: Climate Science in the Classroom. This half-day virtual conference will feature climate scientists and education specialists who will share both their knowledge about climate science as well as classroom-ready resources that educators can use with their students.

View the Conference Agenda

Attend the virtual conference to:

  • Explore the evidence for climate change and its impact
  • Learn about specific climate science awareness tools and strategies you can use in your your classroom
  • Ask questions of climate experts
  • Engage in dialogue with science educators from across the world

All educators registered to the virtual conference will receive access to the conference archives to watch later on demand. A certificate of attendance/participation is available for a modest fee. Please see the registration page for details.

NSTA continues to explore the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) by presenting a web seminar series focusing on the disciplinary core ideas. The spring series features four informative and interactive web seminars on life science and engineering design. Visit the web seminar series page to access archives of web seminars on physical science and Earth and space science.

The web seminar on the disciplinary core idea of Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics addresses questions such as "How do organisms interact with the living and nonliving environments to obtain matter and energy?" and "How do matter and energy move through an ecosystem?"

This web seminar will provide guidance on:

  • which concepts are central to understanding ecosystems
  • how students' understanding of ecosystems might progress over their K-12 education
  • how students can engage in the scientific and engineering practices to gain an understanding of these ideas
  • what instruction might look like in the classroom

 

Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenters: Andy Anderson and Jennifer Doherty

The 2015 first annual Earth Educators' Rendezvous will bring together researchers and practitioners working in all aspects of undergraduate Earth education. We welcome faculty from all disciplines who are interested in improving their teaching about the Earth, administrators from geoscience departments and interdisciplinary programs that want to become stronger, and education researchers of all types. Join the Rendezvous for 2 or 3 days or stay the whole week.

Program

The Earth Rendezvous program will bring together these themes into a rich tapestry of workshops, contributed talks and posters, plenary sessions, and working groups. Drawing across the work currently taking place in geoscience, environmental, and sustainability education, meeting attendees will have the opportunity to learn broadly, focus on a particular issue or challenge, or something in between. All are invited to submit abstracts to the contributed program of posters and short presentations.

Registration and Abstract Submission

Abstract Deadline: March 1, 2015
Early Registration Deadline: April 13, 2015

 

Part of the InTeGrate and Cutting Edge

Programs for Improved Undergraduate Education On the Cutting Edge is managed by NAGT

Program Sponsors: National Science Foundation, The National Association of Geoscience Teachers, The Geological Society of America, The American Geophysical Union

Session topics focus on sharing tested models and strategies for effectively teaching this topic in undergraduate courses. Each participant will contribute tested teaching materials and strategies and participate in the development and review of classroom resources that take advantage of cutting edge technology and pedagogy.

Application deadline - March 1, 2013

A one day workshop for educators interested on learning to expand their climate change interpretation at their own institutions. Through a grant from NOAA, several institutions around the country have developed and thoroughly tested four storyboards that use visual aides to tell the story. Each storyboard has been developed keeping in mind how to effectively communicate climate change in a positive way that leads the listener to action. Lunch will be provided.

When, Where and Who

What

You can expect to gain:

  • Four visual narratives, suitable to be used on a spherical screen (such as Science on a Sphere®, Magic Planet®, or HyperGlobe®), flat screen, or handheld tablet.
  • Theory, based on social and cognitive sciences, used to develop the visual narratives.
  • Opportunities to practice and models for training other colleagues to use these materials.
  • A toolkit to take back to your institution - including the four visual narratives, background information about the theoretical basis for each narrative, relevant climate and ocean science information and videos that illustrate each visual narrative being used by an educator.

About Visualizing Change: Training and Tools to support Informal Educators

Visualizing Change is a 3-year grant funded by NOAA’s Office of Education to help build capacity in the informal science education field to more effectively use global data sets to communicate about climate change, its impact on coastal zones and marine life and how people are working to use scientific information to shape our world.

How

To register or for additional information, please email the contact person at your preferred location/date.

This is a FREE one-day workshop.  Lunch will be provided.  Participants are responsible for travel and parking costs. 

In this webinar, Climate Change LIVE partners highlight professional development programs to empower you as a climate change educator!  Each program offers training to increase your understanding of essential climate concepts and provide you with the tools and resources to implement a science-based climate change curriculum in your classroom and connect with networks of other educators teaching about climate change.  Most of these programs offer grants to schools to help them implement climate change solution-related action projects, and include on-site and online training opportunities.

Presenters: Will Steger Foundation, NOAA, Alliance for Climate Education, ACE 

May (6, 13, 20, 27) and June (17, 24), 2015
Virtual Workshop

 

One of the best ways for students to understand the critical Earth issues facing humanity is through the analysis and interpretation of actual data. Fortunately, there are now many organizations that not only monitor many geophysical and geochemical properties of the earth but provide the data in user-friendly ways. Whether it is through maps, images, animations, or raw data, these data can be mined and interpreted by undergraduates in ways that allow them to develop an understanding of both the relevant critical Earth issues and of issues related to the reliability, errors, and significance associated with scientific conclusions and assertions.

This workshop aims to help instructors of undergraduate classes develop classroom activities, demonstrations, and research opportunities on topics of current societal relevance and interest using new online resources of geoscience data. These activities will be added to the extensive Cutting Edge online teaching activities collection.

REGISTRATION DEADLINE: March 1, 2015

This workshop is part of the On the Cutting Edge professional development program for current and future geoscience faculty, and is sponsored by the National Association of Geoscience Teachers with funding provided by NAGT, and a grant from the National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education and other contributing sponsors.

 

Image Credit: The carbon dioxide visualization was produced by a computer model called GEOS-5, created by scientists at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Global Modeling and Assimilation Office. 

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