In this worksheet-based activity, students review global visualizations of incoming sunlight and surface temperature and discuss seasonal change. Students use the visualizations to support inquiry on the differences in seasonal change in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres and how land and water absorb and release heat differently. The activity culminates in an argument about why one hemisphere experiences warmer summers although it receives less total solar energy.

This video addresses two ways in which black carbon contributes to global warming - when in the atmosphere, it absorbs sunlight and generates heat, warming the air; when deposited on snow and ice, it changes the albedo of the surface. The video is effective in communicating about a problem frequently underrepresented in discussions of climate change and also public health.

With this carbon/temperature interactive model, students investigate the role of atmospheric carbon in the greenhouse effect using a relationship between atmospheric carbon dioxide and global temperature.

This lab exercise is designed to provide a basic understanding of a real-world scientific investigation. Learners are introduced to the concept of tropospheric ozone as an air pollutant due to human activities and burning of fossil fuel energy. The activity uses, analyzes, and visualizes data to investigate this air pollution and climate change problem, determines the season in which it commonly occurs, and communicates the analysis to others in a standard scientific format.

In this activity, students learn about the relationship between greenhouse gases and global warming through a simple teacher demo or hands-on lab activity. Everyday materials are used: beakers, baking soda, vinegar, candle, thermometers, heat source such as a goose-necked lamp, etc. Students shine a light onto three thermometers: a control, an upside down beaker w/ a thermometer and air, and a beaker in which CO2 had been poured.

This short investigation from Carbo Europe explores how temperature relates to the solubility of carbon dioxide in water.

In this hands-on activity, students will learn about dendrochronology (the study of tree rings to understand ecological conditions in the recent past) and come up with conclusions as to what possible climatic conditions might affect tree growth in their region. Students determine the average age of the trees in their schoolyard, investigate any years of poor growth, and draw conclusions about the reasons for those years.

In this investigation learners research the effects of melting sea ice in the Bering Sea Ecosystem. They create research proposals to earn a place on the scientific research vessel Healy and present their findings and proposals to a Research Board committee.

Join us on Monday, March 2nd at 7:30 PM Eastern Time for: Western Water Resources, Climate, and Science

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar

 

Mark Twain famously noted that “whiskey is for drinking; water is for fighting over.” This is particularly true in the semi-arid western United States where the balance between water supply and water demand is nearly equal. Stress on the system is exacerbated by both human demands on the system but also climatevariability and change. Kevin Werner, NOAA’s Western Region Climate Services Director will describe the water resources environment in the Western United States including the impact of climate change. He will also describe his own experience working with decision makers in the water resources sector to utilize forecasts and science from NOAA to improve their operations. 

Following the webinar, there will be an informal discussion of the topics presented. All attendees are invited to participate. There are limited spaces for this discussion, information on joining will be provided during the event.

Please share this opportunity will all interested colleagues and Networks. 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar. Seriously, read the following and save it for reference:

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For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

Vicki Arthur will lead participants through a wide range of education resources from the U.S. Forest Service for teaching about climate change. Forest Service researchers have been observing and studying the effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems for over 30 years. Learn how your students can collect and enter tree data to quantify and put a dollar value on the services that your school yard trees provide.  Discover an interactive atlas where students can learn about computer modeling while observing the potential effects of different emissions scenarios on the ranges of birds and trees. 

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