During this web seminar for educators of students in grades 7-12 participants will learn how to incorporate weather data from NASA’s Earth Observing Satellites into meteorology lessons while addressing national science and technology standards, including the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Educators will explore the benefits of monitoring the climate system with satellites and review how satellites observe key atmospheric elements and features that are important for studying long-term climate trends. Participants will explore the contributions that satellites make to improve our understanding, monitoring, and prediction of climate. The web seminar will also cover the challenges involved in monitoring climate with satellites. Register today!

In the featured activity students use data from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). GOES provides real-time weather data for use in short-term weather forecasting, space environment monitoring, and research and development. POES primarily provides data for long-range weather forecasting, ensuring that non-visible data, for any region of Earth, are no more than six hours old.

Next Generation Science Standards addressed in this web seminar:

  • MS-ESS2 Earth's Systems

    • Science and Engineering Practices

      • Planning and Carrying Out Investigations
    • Disciplinary Core Ideas
    • The Roles of Water in Earth's Surface Processes
    • Weather and Climate
    • Crosscutting Concepts

      • Cause and Effect

Common Core Mathematics Standards addressed in this web seminar:

  • Grade 8

    • Statistics and Probability

Please join us on Tuesday, September 1st at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project is pleased to present Lyndsey Manzo and Barbara Ikalainen for our September, 2015 webinar. Lyndsey and Barbara will discuss how they developed walking tours integrating innovative signage and mobile handheld technologies to teach students, educators and members of the public more about their local environments and the impacts of climate change. 

Lyndsey will present "The Climate Walk" - part of the Ohio State University’s Stone Laboratory student field trip program on Gibraltar Island in the western basin of Lake Erie – which consists of eight strategically placed stations that align with the Essential Principles of Climate Literacy and are accompanied by hands-on approaches to learning about climate change. This interactive place-based journey allows students to explore the impacts of climate change on their local environment, and provides educators with the ability to provide "on the fly" customized content in engaging formats. The Climate Walk is a model that can be replicated and used by formal and informal science educators in regions across the US. 

Barbara will present the process and outcomes of her NOAA Climate Stewards Grant "The North Shore Climate Awareness Project - Why Trees Matter". Barbara created an interactive walking tour of the 10 most interesting tree species on her college campus, posting signs and QR codes on trees allowing students, faculty and the public to instantly access detailed descriptions of that tree species, their carbon sequestration capabilities, and how they will be impacted by climate change in that region.
 

Please share this opportunity will ALL interested colleagues and networks.

 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar. Seriously, read the following and save it for reference: 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial +1 (562) 247-8321 for audio. The access code is: 597-874-782. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 120-411-787

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

 

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to our Listserv at: 

https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/noaaclimatestewards/

Thursday, March 26th - 3:30-4:45pm MT/4:30pm CT/5:30pm ET

The National Climate Assessment, released in May of 2014, summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, touching on many disciplines: earth science, biology, human health, engineering, technology, economics, and policy. Explore the document with a lead NCA author, then learn about related educator resources with Kristen Poppleton from the Will Steger Foundation. Discover how to bring these resources into classroom lessons, engage students in data collection and analysis, share visualizations and citizen science projects. Focus this month will be on the Great Plains region.  Watch for additional regions to be featured in upcoming “Ask US” sessions.

 

Monday, June 6 at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

The Climate Stories Project (CSP) is an educational and artistic forum for sharing stories about personal and community responses to climate change. Through CSP workshops students learn how to engage with climate change through people’s stories, rather than just through the lens of science. In the workshops, students prepare, carry out, and record interviews with local and remote interviewees about their diverse responses to climate change. Students learn to speak with each other about climate change, develop interviewing and editing skills, and create and share original digital storytelling projects. In this presentation you'll learn about the background, goals, methods, and structure of CSP education workshops, and how to integrate them into your existing curriculum. To find out more about CSP, visit climatestoriesproject.org
 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar - Seriously, read the following and save it for your reference: 

  • Log into the webinar AT LEAST 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial 1-(562)-247-8422 for audio. The access code is: 295-545-703. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 119-255-931

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to our Web page 

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to our Listserv

This event is a Google Hangout and will be broadcast live on YouTube. Questions may be submitted during the Hangout using the comments section or via Twitter –use  #AskNICE

The AskNICE Professional Development events occurs every month on the third Thursday of the month from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM Eastern Time (US & Canada). Effective 11/21/2013 until 3/20/2014.  

Teams gather to rapidly prototype game designs (online, pervasive, tabletop, or other formats) and to inject new ideas to help grow the game industry and make educational climate information accessible to a range of audiences.  This is a unique opportunity for students, educators, scientists, game designers and interested public members to work together on the development of climate game prototypes that span a range of platforms, topics, and audiences.

Interested in hosting a local site?   Sign up your site at tinyurl.com/climategamejam

Recognition!  Each site will select a People’s Choice at the end of that site’s jam.  Teams can submit a 2-minute video via Dropbox for consideration and selection for National recognition including:

  • Selection for additional game development support from GlassLabs
  • Selection for inclusion in the Smithsonian Learning Lab – Excellent K-12 “classroom ready” entries that feature sound scientific concepts have the opportunity to be included on the Smithsonian’s new Learning Lab. As part of the Learning Lab, these games will be available to educators across the nation.
  • Selection for inclusion in the National Museum of Natural History’s showcase – Select finalists will be offered the opportunity to be showcased in an arcade on the grounds of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. The showcase will take place in November.

Upcoming Pre-Jam Events:

Remake Learning Hang-out: Games in the Classroom, September 22, 2 pm EST

Extreme Event: River City Game Night, September 30, 6:30-8:30 pm EST, Koshland Science Museum, Washington, D.C. 

NOS’s Communications and Education Division is providing organizational leadership for this event and is working closely with NOAA’s Climate Program Office and other NOAA offices for subject matter expertise. Partners include Smithsonian Institution; Koshland Science Center; GlassLab; Entertainment Software Association; Wilson Center; California Academy of Science; STEMHero; Polar Learning and Responding (PoLAR) Climate Change Education Partnership; University of Oklahoma; Paleontological Research Institute (Cornell); Harmony High School (FL); Barnard College; Michigan Technological University; BrainPOP; and Zulama.

Interested in more information?

Contact Peg.Steffen@noaa.gov 

Why games?

Games are increasingly used in educational and other settings to help inspire curiosity, creativity, collaboration, optimism, and problem-solving skills.  They provide a powerful opportunity for enhancing climate literacy. Serious games address real-world challenges, compress big problems into immediate experiences, encourage systems thinking, and promote active engagement, making them particularly well suited to climate change education.  The field of games focused on climate change is growing, yet there remain gaps in the type of content covered.  

In December 2014, the White House Office of Science & Technology Policy launched the Climate Education and Literacy Initiative with the goal of connecting American students with best-availablescientificinformation about climate change. As a commitment in support of this effort, Federal and non-governmental experts are collaborating to harness the promise of educational games and interactive media to enhance understanding and awareness of climate change impacts and solutions.

In this web seminar, you will learn to use satellite data from NASA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) missions in your meteorology lessons. You will be introduced to websites containing authentic GOES and POES data and imagery files and be shown how to download and use the files with students. 

Register today!

The National Climate Assessment, released in May of 2014, summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, touching on many disciplines: earth science, biology, human health, engineering, technology, economics, and policy. Explore the document with lead NCA author, Sarah Trainor, then learn about related educator resources with Jessica Brunacini from the PoLAR Partnership.

Discover how to bring these resources into classroom lessons, engage students in data collection and analysis, share visualizations and citizen science projects. 

Focus this month will be on the Alaska region. Watch for additional regions to be featured in upcoming “Ask US” sessions.

Also explore the NCA Education Resources for the Alaska Region to help to unpack the key messages of the region and point to related, high-quality online resources.

11:30 pm Pacific | 12:30 pm Mountain | 1:30 pm Central | 2:30 pm Eastern

Presenters: Anne Egger (Moderator; Central Washington University), Ed Geary (Western Washington University), Kathryn Baldwin (Eastern Washington University), Kyle Gray (University of Northern Iowa), Scott Linneman (Western Washington University)

This webinar is part of a series supporting teaching with InTeGrate principles, using InTeGrate-developed and curated materials as tools.

This webinar will provide an opportunity to learn from faculty and staff who are using InTeGrate teaching principles and materials as a vehicle for transforming teacher preparation. Anne Egger is an InTeGrate project leader, team leader/editor of InTeGrate's teacher preparation modules. She and Ed Geary are leaders of the Washington State STEM Teacher Preparation Implementation Program. Kathryn Baldwin, Kyle Gray, and Scott Linneman are authors of the InTeGrate teacher preparation modules, Soils, Systems, and SocietyInteractions between Water, Earth's Surface, and Human Activity, and Exploring Geoscience Methods, respectively. Together, the speakers will address the alignment of InTeGrate principals with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), demonstrate how to use InTeGrate modules to transforming teacher preparation, and how this topic extends to STEM teacher preparation in general. The webinar will include 35 minutes of presentation and 20 minutes for discussion. Participants are encouraged to both ask questions of the presenters and discuss their own experiences on the subject.

Goals

At the end of this webinar, participants will have

  • insights on the role of sustainability and social justice in science teaching
  • an understanding of the relationship between InTeGrate guiding principles and goals of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)
  • examples of how to use InTeGrate materials to develop teaching skills that intertwine the three dimensions of NGSS (science and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas)
  • greater familiarity with InTeGrate principles and resources
  • new colleagues engaged in this work

 

Logistics

Time - 11:30 pm Pacific | 12:30 pm Mountain | 1:30 pm Central | 2:30 pm Eastern
Duration - 1 hour
Format - Online web presentation via Adobe Connect web conference software with questions and discussion.
Registration - Please register for this webinar by Wednesday, June 1.
Preparation - There is no advance preparation required for this webinar.

Please email Alice Newman (anewman AT carleton.edu) if you have any questions about this event.

Presenters

Anne Egger (moderator), Geological Sciences, Science Education, Central Washington University

Ed Geary, Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education, Western Washington University

Kathryn Baldwin, Education, Eastern Washington University

Kyle Gray, Earth Science, Science Education, University of Northern Iowa

Scott Linneman, Geology, Western Washington University

 

This NASA event is a Google Hangout and will be broadcast live on YouTube. Questions may be submitted during the Hangout using the comments section or via Twitter –use  #AskNICE

The AskNICE Professional Development events occurs every month on the third Thursday of the month from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM Eastern Time (US & Canada). Effective 11/21/2013 until 3/20/2014.  

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