Looking for fun, hands-on activities to engage your visitors, students and community on the topic of climate change?  Come to the New England Aquarium for a FREE training about these activities and climate change education. 

This training is ideal for classroom teachers and informal educators from various institutions hoping to engage students and adults around the topic of climate change. 

 

This program featured:

  • Presentation by the award-winning Alliance for Climate Education (ACE)
  • Student moderators and panel discussions
  • Videos of student-led projects from across the country
  • Student perspectives that will lead to the conversation in the second webcast

A recording is available.

Monday, February 1st at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

Getting Real: Health in the Teaching of Climate and Earth Science
 

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project welcomes Dr. John M. Balbus, M.D., M.P.H., Senior Advisor for Public Health to the Director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences as our featured speaker this month.

Presentation Abstract: 

The impacts on health of climate change as well as the societal responses to climate change are varied and significant. In the past five years, recognition of the importance of the health implications of climate change has grown enormously, from major reports in the premier international medical journal Lancet to messaging from the President about the US Clean Power Plant rule and Climate Action Plan. Understanding how climate change and climate variability affect people’s health and well being is a foundational aspect of basic climate literacy. For teachers, integrating content and exercises on health provides an opportunity to engage students in earth science with projects that both demonstrate the relevance of the science and also require development of critical analytic and synthetic skills. Health content related to climate change can also augment curricula in the social sciences, history, literature, and the visual arts. This talk will summarize the health implications of climate change and encourage discussion of how health content can help teachers achieve their educational goals. 
 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar

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  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial 1-(914)-614-3221 for audio. The access code is: 367-785-127. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 145-578-259

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to our Web page

 

6-7:00pm ET/3-4:00pm PT

The GLOBE Program  originally developed posters and activities for teachers to help students explore the concepts of Earth as a system, find patterns and connections between and among maps containing different environmental data, and to understand the relationship between time and space in regard to global environmental data.

In 2014, a digital GLOBE Earth system ePoster is now provided by the MY NASA DATA project to extend the opportunities for learning. This digital poster provides data for 2005 through 2013 and enables interactive exploration of the data in more detail through the use of animations. The animations can be used with students to find patterns among different environmental data, understand the relationship among different environmental parameters, and understand how the data changes seasonally and over longer time scales.

In this interactive educator webinar, Tina Harte, education specialist at NASA Langley Research Center and former middle school science teacher, will explore the ePoster and activities will be discussed for K-12 students, with a focus on those meeting NGSS performance expectations, science practices and cross-cutting concepts related to Earth System Science.

July 31 to August 1- ONLINE SESSIONS
August 5-6 - SESSIONS at NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Columbia University in New York City 
Graduate Credit Option: University of Michigan-Flint
 
Climate Change in the Classroom is a professional development event for 8th – 12th grade English, Math, Science and Social Studies teachers. The workshop sponsors, GISS, Columbia University, the Science Museum of Minnesota, University of Michigan-Flint, Real World Matters and Mindblue Productions, invite teachers to explore the science underlying global climate change in today's headlines with researchers on the frontlines of advancing knowledge.  A special focus will be developing climate literacy to evaluate energy solutions for mitigating global climate change.  Guided by education faculty, teachers will pilot a new curriculum - Hot: One World, One Climate. CCIC will involve teachers in a learning experience that will deepen understanding about how students learn science, build strategies for using climate change topics as a context for science and math instruction, and facilitate student learning through problem-solving, inquiry and an engaging role-play simulation.            
 
Learn More and Apply @ http://www.giss.nasa.gov/meetings/

This month's webinar will build on the theme of Earth's Energy Budget with an investigation into clouds and their role in Earth's climate system. Participants will learn about resources from the Students' Cloud Observations On-Line, or S'COOL, program that allows students to practice cloud identification and submit observations to NASA as citizen scientists. Participants will also take a closer look at posters and interactive features created using data from the CERES instrument that is aboard a variety of NASA satellites.

Certificates of professional development hours are available upon request. Additional session dates will be announced soon.

January 28, 2016
12-1 pm ET

 

People make hundreds of decisions every day, weighing risks and benefits and coming to conclusions. In a perfect world, people are objective when they perceive risks and make decisions in climate and other domains. But psychological research suggests that this is not always how the human mind works.

In this webinar, they will consider examples in climate change and other politically charged domains, and present evidence-based strategies that can help improve communication.

The webinar is free. To register click here. Once registered, you will receive a confirmation email with log-in information.

Speaker: Dr. Ellen Peters, The Ohio State University

Dr. Ellen Peters is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Decision Sciences Collaborative at The Ohio State University. Her research focuses on understanding the basic building blocks of human judgment and decision making, including how critical information can be communicated to facilitate better decisions in health, financial, and environmental contexts. She is former President of the Society for Judgment and Decision Making, former Chair of FDA’s Risk Communication Advisory Committee, and is a current member of the National Academies committee on the Science of Science Communication. She is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, and the Society of Experimental Psychology. Her research has been funded extensively by the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health.

Visit changingclimate.osu.edu and greatlakesclimate.com to view previous webinars and other climate resources.

 

4:00pm-5:00pm ET

Investigate the National Climate Assessment (or NCA) report during Earth Science Week with Research Scientist Alison Delgado on Wednesday, October 15, 2014 from 4-5pm ET. Get an in-depth view on how our climate is changing and what observations are telling us all in Spanish. Discover how to integrate the National Climate Assessment into your STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) classroom through NASA hands-on activities in Spanish. Engage students with NASA unique projects including how to use clouds, climate and weather through NASA’s Students’ Cloud Observations On-Line or S’COOL project. The entire session and lessons will be presented in Spanish.

For more information about this session please contact NASA Education Specialist Marilé Colón Robles at Marile.ColonRobles@nasa.gov

Presenters:

Alison Delgado, Research Scientist at the Joint Global Change Research Institute
Marilé Colón Robles, NASA Educator Professional Development Specialist at NASA Langley Research Center

About the Presenters:

Alison Delgado is a Research Scientist at the Joint Global Change Research Institute, a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Maryland at College Park. She is currently assigned to USGCRP for U.S. DOE where she is serving as Sector Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment. In that capacity, she is coordinating with government agencies, scientists, NGOs, academia and industry to develop the Third National Climate Assessment, particularly to assess impacts of climate change on sectors that include energy, agriculture and rural communities, forests, transportation and public health. She also supports the working group on Scenarios and Interpretive Science.

Marilé Colón Robles is a NASA Education Specialist at NASA Langley Research Center. She creates and teaches professional development workshops for pre-service and in-service teachers as well as informal educators all over the country, delivering these opportunities in both English and Spanish.

NASA STEM inmersa en español para el desarrollo profesional de educadores: la Evaluación Climática Nacional
Investigue los resultados de la Evaluación Climática Nacional (o NCA por sus siglas en inglés) durante la semana de la ciencias terrestres con científica de investigación Alison Delgado el miércoles, 15 de octubre, 2014 de 4-5pm ET. Obtenga un análisis detallado de cómo nuestro clima está cambiando y qué nos dicen las observaciones científicas. Descubre cómo integrar el reporte en tu salón de clase STEM a través de actividades interactivas de la NASA en español. Aprenda sobre proyectos de la NASA perfecto para estudiantes incluyendo cómo utilizar nubes, clima y el tiempo con el proyecto de observaciones de nubes estudiantiles de la NASA en línea, o S’COOL. Esta sesión será completamente en español.

Para obtener más información acerca de esta sesión contacte la especialista de educación de la NASA Marilé Colón Robles a Marile.ColonRobles@nasa.gov.

Presentadores:

Alison Delgado, científica de investigaciones en el Joint Global Change Research Institute

Marilé Colón Robles, especialista de desarrollo profesional para educadores de la NASA en el Centro de Investigaciones Langley de la NASA

Learn about integrating climate change education into your classroom or informal education programming, get an introduction to regionally relevant climate science, and hear about how other educators have used these materials. The webinar will be presented by educators who have used the resources in their own teaching, both in the classroom and in place-based education.

Certificates of attendance for professional development contact hours can be requested after the webinar; instructions will be provided during the session.

The presentation will cover:

  • Ohio Sea Grant’s updated Great Lakes Climate Change Curriculum
  • climate and Great Lakes literacy principles
  • informal resources to supplement and expand lesson plans

Monday, April 7, 2014 at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

Frank Niepold, NOAA Climate Program Office's Education coordinator, will discuss developing student’s 21st century skills by incorporating digitally available activities, videos, and visualizations into the classroom. The rigorously reviewed digital educational resources developed by the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) and syndicated through NOAA’s Climate.gov web site will be examined. A focal point will be how to teach a climate and energy learning progression across elementary through high school grades taking into account contact time and coherence matter constraints.

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