Friday, April 17 at 1:00 PM EDT

In this webinar, a panel of Arctic experts will present the booklet and outline how climate changes currently underway in the Arctic are a driver for global sea-level rise, offer new prospects for natural resource extraction, and have rippling effects through the world’s weather, climate, food supply and economy. The webinar will feature a presentation and Q&A session with:

Julie Brigham-Grette, Professor of Quaternary/Glacial Geology at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, Chair of the National Research Council’s Polar Research Board, and Co-Chair of the authoring committee of Lessons and Legacies of International Polar Year 2007-2008.

Stephanie Pfirman, Professor of Environmental Sciences at Barnard College and Co-Chair of the authoring committee of The Arctic in the Anthropocene: Emerging Research Questions.

James White, Director of the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, Professor of Geological Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and Chair of the authoring committee of Abrupt Impacts of Climate Change: Anticipating Surprises.

 

Arctic Matters: The Global Connection to Changes in the Arctic

Download the Booklet PDF

Register for the webinar

Interactive website — coming soon!

This booklet is an educational resource from the National Research Council’s Polar Research Board that introduces the threats and opportunities of the Arctic’s rapidly changing environment and explains why the Arctic matters — to all of us.

Viewed in satellite images as a jagged white coat draped over the top of the globe, the high Arctic appears distant and isolated. But even if you don’t live there, don’t do business there, and will never travel there, you are closer to the Arctic than you think.

Arctic Matters: The Global Connection to Changes in the Arctic draws on a large collection of peer-reviewed National Research Council reports and other national and international reports to provide a brief, reader-friendly primer on the complex ways in which the changes currently affecting the Arctic and its diverse people, resources, and environment can, in turn, affect the entire globe.

 

Spring webinar series continues on Monday, April 25th at 3pm EDT (12pm PDT) 

Presented by: Ariana Sutton-Grier, NOAA National Ocean Service & lead for NOAA's Coastal Blue Carbon Team 

There is growing interest nationally and internationally in leveraging the carbon benefits (termed “blue carbon”) of coastal habitats in climate and coastal resilience policies.  Coastal wetlands (specifically mangroves, salt marshes, and seagrass meadows) have unique characteristics that make them incredibly efficient, natural carbon sinks with most carbon stored below ground in soils.  Protecting and restoring these ecosystems around the globe will help maintain all the societal benefits these ecosystems provide including the natural climate mitigation benefits, but also the food security, water quality, and storm protection benefits that enhance coastal communities and economies.
 
This presentation will discuss the state of the science and policy of blue carbon including: (1) incorporation of coastal wetland carbon in U.S. national climate, resilience, and conservation efforts; (2) potential steps to incorporate coastal wetlands in national greenhouse gas inventories as suggested by the 2013 International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Wetlands Supplement; and opportunities to include coastal wetlands in voluntary carbon markets.  The presentation will conclude by highlighting some of the most pressing blue carbon scientific gaps that need to be filled in order to support these developing policies.  
On behalf of the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program
 

Following the presentation there will be a few short informational announcements relevant to the ocean acidification communication community. Please forward this invitation to interested colleagues. We look forward to seeing you at this event!

More info on the series and upcoming webinars can be found here

 

During this half-day symposium at the NSTA 2013 National Conference in San Antonio, scientists and education specialists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will discuss how NOAA collects, manages, and analyzes data about climate and how educators can access and use this data in the classroom. Participants will learn about websites and resources that utilize climate data, including drought, sea surface temperature, coastal water quality, and ocean acidification.

Attendance at the symposium requires conference registration.

Join us for this month's webinar on Thursday, April 30th at 4pm EDT (1pm PDT)

Presented by: Scott Doney, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and Jim Foley, Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education
 
Space is limited
 
At 3400 m (11,155 ft) above the Pacific Ocean, on one of the most isolated mountains in the world, is an observatory that has been meticulously measuring our atmosphere for almost 60 years. Mauna Loa on the Island of Hawaii is more than 3700 km (2300 mi) away from the nearest major land mass, California, yet it is easily accessible. Mauna Loa was chosen by Dr. Charles David Keeling to make atmospheric carbon dioxide measurements because this location allowed access to air masses representative of the northern hemisphere. Since his measurements began in 1958, the concentration of atmospheric CO2 has been marching higher and higher at a rate that can only be attributed to the burning of fossil fuels.

Thirty years after Dr. Keeling began his time-series measurements that would come to be known as the Keeling Curve, another time-series began in Hawaii. This time the measurements were taken at a spot to represent the Pacific Ocean. Dubbed Station ALOHA, it is located 100 km (60 mi) north of Oahu where the depth is 4800 m (15758 ft). Since1988, the Hawaii Ocean Time-Series (HOT) program has been making near monthly four-day research cruises to Station ALOHA to measure how the ocean is changing over time. One of the many measurements taken with the HOT program is the amount of carbon dioxide dissolved in seawater. While there is much more variability in seawater, carbon dioxide in the ocean is increasing at the same rate as in the atmosphere. Unlike other atmospheric gasses like oxygen and nitrogen, carbon dioxide reacts with water to form a weak acid that is changing the chemistry of the ocean. While the carbon dioxide of the ocean has increased, the pH of the ocean has decreased, becoming more acidic.

An acidifying ocean will have substantial impacts on the marine life that depends on stable ocean chemistry for survival. Organisms such as corals, oysters, and snails that build body structures out of calcium carbonate will have a particularly tough time with ocean acidification.  Ocean acidification has already had economic impacts for several communities, and even greater impacts may be felt in the future. During this webinar, we will present some of the dangers posed by ocean acidification as well as demonstrations that can be done to discuss the impacts and chemistry of ocean acidification.

Following the presentation there will be a few short informational announcements relevant to the ocean acidification communication community. Please forward this invitation to interested colleagues. We look forward to seeing you at this event!

 

More info on the series and upcoming webinars can be found here

 

The Fine Print: Important Notes for participating in the Webinar 

1.Plan to log into the Webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar is continually upgrading their software. We want to be sure that your computer has time to access any upgrades and you are able to access the presentation and meeting.                   

2. When using the VOIP option for this Webinar, you must use a headset or ear bud-speakers. This will keep your output audio from re-entering your microphone, causing distortion

3. If you have difficulty logging in to the Webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 101-989-683

One, 60-minute virtual session - Thursday, April 21
12:00 pm Pacific | 1:00 pm Mountain | 2:00 pm Central | 3:00 pm Eastern

This webinar will demonstrate how soils can be used to broaden students' understanding of the Earth system and human impacts on this system. Kathryn Baldwin is the author of the InTeGrate module Soils, Systems, and Society. Hannah Scherer and Martha Murphy are authors of the InTeGrate module A Growing Concern: Sustaining Soil Resources through Local Decision Making. Drawing from these two InTeGrate modules, the presenters will discuss how soils, soil health and soil sustainability provide unique opportunities for engaging students and developing their systems thinking. Examples from the modules show how local data can be used to elucidate abstract concepts and how systems thinking can be applied to real problems. The webinar will include 30 minutes of presentation and 25 minutes for discussion. Participants are encouraged to both ask questions of the presenters and discuss their own experiences of teaching about soils in the context of Earth systems.

For more information on the series and to learn more about InTeGrate visit:http://serc.carleton.edu/integrate/workshops/index.html

 

The GLOBE Surface Temperature Train-the-Trainer workshop will be held on Friday, April 12, 2013 at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA. Trainers, Partners, and Teachers certified in Surf Temp are invited to attend a FREE Surface Temperature training by Master Trainer & Lead Scientist for this protocol, Dr. Kevin Czajkowski.

Monday, May 18, at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

The peoples, lands, and resources of indigenous communities in the United States, including Alaska and the Pacific Rim, face an array of challenges, many of which are exacerbated by climate change impacts. As one of the most marginalized demographics, the consequences of observed and projected climate change are already dramatically impacting Indigenous ways of life that have persisted for thousands of years. Both the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the Third National Climate Assessment acknowledge that the greatest opportunities for mitigating and adapting to climate impacts must include indigenous knowledge and perspectives.

This webinar will focus on the key findings from the Third National Climate Assessment emphasising findings from the chapter on Indigenous Peoples, Lands and Resources. Presentations will include discussions on access to traditional food, decreases in water quality and quantity and sea ice, and relocation of Native communities brought on by changing climate conditions.

Our Featured Presenters will include:

Following the webinar, there will be an informal discussion of the topics presented. All attendees are invited to participate. There are limited spaces for this discussion, information on joining will be provided during the event.

Please share this opportunity will all interested colleagues and Networks.

 
Important Information for participating in this Webinar. 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting at the start time.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting using VOIP, dial +1 (415) 655-0059 for audio. The access code is: 539-911-382. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to:http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 110-978-691

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

 

Time – 4:00 PM or 7:00 PM (EDT) 

Duration: 1 hour

Date: May 2, 2016

To join the webinar go to:

http://remc.adobeconnect.com/ICCARS2015-2016

then call 877-336-1828 and add the access code 1767689. 

 

Are you an educator interested in Learning and Sharing about Climate Change and Remote Sensing?  

If so, join hosts David Bydlowski and Andy Henry, Monday, May 2, 2016 for the ICCARS (Investigating Climate Change and Remote Sensing) Professional Learning Network (PLN) webinar series.

This month’s topic is “Climate Change: Science, Impacts, and How Individuals Can Help,” with special guest Dr. Tom Kovacs, Professor of Meteorology in the Department of Geography and Geology and Program Director for the IESS Program, Eastern Michigan University.

Tom received his B.S. in Meteorology from Northern Illinois University, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Meteorology from the Pennsylvania State University. His research involves satellite remote sensing of the atmosphere with weather and climate applications. He was the lead of science studies for the Hampton University NASA contract for the Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission. The CALIPSO satellite, launched on April 28, 2006, has on-board a nadir looking three-channel polarization sensitive lidar. He is currently a professor at Eastern Michigan University (EMU) and teaches weather and climate courses to future teachers and scientists. He is also coordinator for the Interdisciplinary Environmental Science and Society program at EMU. Collectively, he has authored over 20 peer-reviewed journal articles and conference abstracts.

For more information on the ICCARS PLN webinar series, please visit:

http://www.iccarsproject.net/resources/lifelines-plc

Time: 3:30 p.m. ET / 2:30 p.m. CT / 1:30 p.m. MT / 12:30 p.m. PT

One of the key needs for successful implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards are resources that are well-aligned to the standards. The Educators Evaluating the Quality of Instructional Products (EQuIP) Rubric for science provides criteria by which to measure the alignment and overall quality of lessons and units with respect to the NGSS. The rubric is an effective tool that enables teachers and administrators, in teams or individually, to review existing instructional materials to determine what revisions are needed, provide constructive criterion-based feedback to developers, and identify exemplars/models for teachers' use within and across states. Register today!

The web seminar will provide guidance on:

  • the key attributes resources should have to meet the letter and spirit of NGSS
  • the structure and features of the rubric
  • using the rubric to select and supplement curriculum resources

Details

Title: Evaluating Resources for NGSS: The EQuIP Rubric
Target audience: Educators of grades K-12
Dates: Tuesday, July 29, 2014
Time: 3:30 p.m. ET / 2:30 p.m. CT / 1:30 p.m. MT / 12:30 p.m. PT
Duration: 90 minutes
Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenters: Brian J. Reiser and Joe Krajcik

Vicki Arthur will lead participants through a wide range of education resources from the U.S. Forest Service for teaching about climate change. Forest Service researchers have been observing and studying the effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems for over 30 years. Learn how your students can collect and enter tree data to quantify and put a dollar value on the services that your school yard trees provide.  Discover an interactive atlas where students can learn about computer modeling while observing the potential effects of different emissions scenarios on the ranges of birds and trees. 

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