The third National Climate Assessment (NCA) report, released May 6, 2014, is the most comprehensive look at climate change impacts in the United States to date. Based on years of work by hundreds of diverse experts, the NCA (http://nca2014.globalchange.gov/) confirms that climate change is affecting us – and the natural resources we rely on – right now. Join authors of NCA chapters on Ecosystems, Forests, and Adaptation together with representatives from the U.S. Global Change Research Program and the NCA Indicator System to discuss key findings and implications for managers.

 The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Wildlife Federation have developed a series of web conferences to increase communication and transfer of technical information between conservation professionals regarding the increasing challenges from climate change. This program is being facilitated by the USFWS's National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) Applied Landscape Conservation Team.

A partnership between the National Wildlife Federation and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Monday, March 7th at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project welcomes Dr. T.J. Fudge, Paleoclimate Researcher, University of Washington, and Ms. Louise Huffman, Education Program Manager, US Ice Drilling Program as their featured speakers this month.

What's the latest in Antarctic paleo-climate research? Tune in to learn about the nation's newest ice core expedition...SPICE Core (South Pole Ice Core)! Investigators seeking data from the past 40,000 years are drilling a 1500 meter ice core to study chemical isotopes, tiny particles called aerosols and atmospheric gases trapped in the earth's great southern ice sheet. The goal is to investigate environmental change since the last glacial/inter-glacial transition.

Why was the South Pole targeted? What criteria affect the specific site selection for drilling? What new kinds of technology were required? Dr. T.J. Fudge will answer your questions, and share the latest from his work in the Pole's extreme environment.

Educational resources from the US Ice Drilling Program will be showcased by IDPO’s Education Program Manager, Louise Huffman.

Important Information for participating in this Webinar -
 
Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial 1-(213)-929-4212 for audio. The access code is: 234-544-393. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 128-311-523

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to our Web page

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to our Listserv

Gain the tools needed to quickly ramp up to the Next Generation Science Standards* in a workshop that combines climate science, systems thinking, and science communications skills through media production. Tackle your media anxieties and tap into the excitement around media production, using easy-to-use lesson plans that bring student media production into any instructional environment.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: Friday, March 1, 2013

Join them for this self-paced online course (Massive Open Online Course, MOOC).  The course will run over 4.5 weeks requiring a total of 20-25 hours to complete, start date is April 1, 2015.

Why is water at the heart of so much conflict in the American West? How have major cities and extensive agricultural systems been able to thrive in the Western United States despite most of the region being either a desert or semi-desert environment? How will a warming climate affect the availability and use of water in a region populated by tens of millions of people?

Join us in exploring these and other questions as we combine an overview of the science behind water and climate in the Western US with a survey of the major legal, political, and cultural issues focused on this precious resource.

You will hear from over 15 experts in water management, policy, and research in the West. We will start with history, politics and culture of water development in the Western US (module 1) and hydrology, water demand and climate in the Western US (module 2) before we dive into a case study around the Colorado River Basin (module 3) and explore controversial water issues (module 4).

This course will include many resources for educators. Educators can earn professional development credit by signing up for an parallel two credit hours course at the cost of $140.

This course is free and open to the public.  Register now!

 

Anne Gold, Associate Scientist and Science Educator, CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

Eric Gordon, Managing Director of Western Water Assessment, CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

In this webinar, Climate Change LIVE partners highlight professional development programs to empower you as a climate change educator!  Each program offers training to increase your understanding of essential climate concepts and provide you with the tools and resources to implement a science-based climate change curriculum in your classroom and connect with networks of other educators teaching about climate change.  Most of these programs offer grants to schools to help them implement climate change solution-related action projects, and include on-site and online training opportunities.

Presenters: Will Steger Foundation, NOAA, Alliance for Climate Education, ACE 

Date: Saturday, March 12, 2016
Time:
10 a.m. – 3 p.m. ET
9 a.m. – 2 p.m. CT
8 a.m. – 1 p.m. MT
7 a.m. – 12 p.m. PT

NSTA, in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), would like to invite you to attend the virtual conference titled: Climate Science in the Classroom. This half-day virtual conference will feature climate scientists and education specialists who will share both their knowledge about climate science as well as classroom-ready resources that educators can use with their students.

View the Conference Agenda

Attend the virtual conference to:

  • Explore the evidence for climate change and its impact
  • Learn about specific climate science awareness tools and strategies you can use in your your classroom
  • Ask questions of climate experts
  • Engage in dialogue with science educators from across the world

All educators registered to the virtual conference will receive access to the conference archives to watch later on demand. A certificate of attendance/participation is available for a modest fee. Please see the registration page for details.

Session topics focus on sharing tested models and strategies for effectively teaching this topic in undergraduate courses. Each participant will contribute tested teaching materials and strategies and participate in the development and review of classroom resources that take advantage of cutting edge technology and pedagogy.

Application deadline - March 1, 2013

Wednesday, February 18th – 4:00pm PT/7:00pm ET

The National Climate Assessment, released in May of 2014, summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, touching on many disciplines: earth science, biology, human health, engineering, technology, economics, and policy. Explore the document with a lead NCA author, then learn about related educator resources with Minda Berbeco from the National Center for Science Education. Discover how to bring these resources into classroom lessons, engage students in data collection and analysis, share visualizations and citizen science projects. 

Focus this month will be on the Southwest region. Watch for additional regions to be featured in upcoming “Ask US” sessions.

A one day workshop for educators interested on learning to expand their climate change interpretation at their own institutions. Through a grant from NOAA, several institutions around the country have developed and thoroughly tested four storyboards that use visual aides to tell the story. Each storyboard has been developed keeping in mind how to effectively communicate climate change in a positive way that leads the listener to action. Lunch will be provided.

When, Where and Who

What

You can expect to gain:

  • Four visual narratives, suitable to be used on a spherical screen (such as Science on a Sphere®, Magic Planet®, or HyperGlobe®), flat screen, or handheld tablet.
  • Theory, based on social and cognitive sciences, used to develop the visual narratives.
  • Opportunities to practice and models for training other colleagues to use these materials.
  • A toolkit to take back to your institution - including the four visual narratives, background information about the theoretical basis for each narrative, relevant climate and ocean science information and videos that illustrate each visual narrative being used by an educator.

About Visualizing Change: Training and Tools to support Informal Educators

Visualizing Change is a 3-year grant funded by NOAA’s Office of Education to help build capacity in the informal science education field to more effectively use global data sets to communicate about climate change, its impact on coastal zones and marine life and how people are working to use scientific information to shape our world.

How

To register or for additional information, please email the contact person at your preferred location/date.

This is a FREE one-day workshop.  Lunch will be provided.  Participants are responsible for travel and parking costs. 

The opportunities and pathways for careers in natural resources and sustainability areas are diverse and the conversation between employers and higher education is only just beginning. This workshop will focus on articulating the breadth of opportunities and identifying the knowledge and skills that are pathways to different types of employment.

Application Deadline: February 22, 2013

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