The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) brings considerably more attention to climate and climate change than earlier curriculum standards. The session will explore what and how to teach climate in ways connected to NGSS's three dimensions: (science and engineering practices, cross-cutting themes, and disciplinary core ideas (DCIs)), especially the most connected DCI: Human Impacts. We welcome abstracts addressing innovative roles for scientists assisting educators, student engagement with real data, materials and approaches that attend to the climate-energy connection; exemplary curricular materials, successful out-of-school programs, and strategies for dealing with anti-science sentiments.

The live streams will begin 15 minutes before the session times. View the full program. Note: All times are in PST.

Application deadline is Monday, March 16, 2015

The National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation announces a professional development opportunity for interpreters who focus on climate change and ocean issues.

About the National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI)

NNOCCI is a collaborative effort led by the New England Aquarium with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, the FrameWorks Institute, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the National Aquarium in Baltimore, Monterey Bay Aquarium, the New Knowledge Organization in partnership with Pennsylvania State University and the Ohio's Center for Science and Industry. With support from the NSF Climate Change Education Partnership program, NNOCCI's goal is to establish a national network of professionals who are skilled in communicating climate science to the American public in ways that are engaging and stimulate productive dialog.

What is a Study Circle? 
A NNOCCI Study Circle is a cross-disciplinary learning group made up of peers with expertise from fields of professional interpretation, climate and ocean sciences and communications and cultural sciences. Through a series of facilitated in-person meetings, webinars, conference calls and practical activities, participants build knowledge of ocean and climate science and communications and cultural sciences. They apply lessons learned to communications or educational opportunities in the context of their work environment through several cycles of development, practice, sharing and reflection. Participants continue to build knowledge of ocean and climate science and communications and cultural sciences throughout the Study Circle, and gain resources and materials to train staff, volunteers, and other audiences at their home institutions.

The Study Circle has two major phases. During the first six months participants engage in a formal, facilitated learning process. Upon graduating participants join the larger network of colleagues and continue to experiment, evaluate and share successes from their work with each other. Through the Study Circle, participants will learn about the latest findings in climate science and oceanography and how to apply these to interpretive contexts in their home institutions. In addition participants build trust and lasting bonds among colleagues from multiple institutions who share an interest in developing effective ways to engage audiences in learning about climate and ocean change.

Who is the Study Circle for?
The Study Circle is intended for pairs of staff members from informal learning centers such as zoos, aquariums, science centers, National Parks, natural preserves, and other institutions that have an interest in coastal or ocean issues.

Costs and Compensation:
NNOCCI will pay for direct costs1 for participation in Study Circle activities that are not also part of participants' routine work. This includes travel, lodging and food for in-person meetings. NNOCCI will also provide a $3,000 stipend2 to up to 10 institutions which support two staff members to participate in the Study Circle.

Key Criteria:
Applicants should have institutional support before they apply. The institution should meet the following criteria:

  • Have an ocean or coastal ecology  connection within their work.
  • Have regular interpretation programming led by staff and/or volunteers.
  • Have interest in addressing issues related to climate change.
  • Be willing to support two staff members to fully participate in both the learning and evaluation phases of the Study Circle. Each applicant must fill out their own separate application.
  • Be willing to support NNOCCI’s evaluation efforts, which will entail an onsite visitor survey that the two staff members or volunteers will collect after presentations or other education programming. This survey effort will take place twice: 1) in the months immediately before the Study Circle meetings, and 2) six months after the training is complete.

Criteria for individual participants:

  • Able to commit to 3 in-person meetings (see dates, below) and about 3 hours/week of Study Circle work from approximately August 2015 through December 2015.
  • Able to commit to coordinating one-page visitor impact surveys at your institution several months prior to the first Study Circle and in the six months following the last Study Circle meeting.
  • Have regular opportunities to apply information and learning from the Study Circle through professional responsibilities such as interpretation for visitors, written communications, educational programming or presenting training for colleagues or volunteer interpreters.
  • Have supervisor support for full participation in the Study Circle.
  • Have a colleague who meets all of the criteria above as a co-applicant.

In Person Meeting Dates:*

Study Circle 'A'

  • September 16 and 17, 2015 (Boston, MA)
  • October 28 and 29, 2015 (Woods Hole, MA)
  • December 2 and 3, 2015 (location to be announced)

Study Circle 'B'

  • September 23 and 24, 2015 (Boston, MA)
  • November 4 and 5, 2015 (Woods Hole, MA)
  • December 9 and 10, 2015 (location to be announced)

*Please note that we are offering two distinct study circle options for Fall 2015. You and your partner must commit to the same study circle dates. If these dates do not fit for you and your institution, please note that additional Study Circles are being planned for and Spring and Fall 2016. 

How to apply:

Both applicants from an institution should submit a separate application. Click here to fill out the online application. Application deadline is Monday, March 16, 2015.

Please email with questions or concerns.

During this web seminar for educators of students in grades 7-12 participants will learn how to incorporate weather data from NASA’s Earth Observing Satellites into meteorology lessons while addressing national science and technology standards, including the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Educators will explore the benefits of monitoring the climate system with satellites and review how satellites observe key atmospheric elements and features that are important for studying long-term climate trends. Participants will explore the contributions that satellites make to improve our understanding, monitoring, and prediction of climate. The web seminar will also cover the challenges involved in monitoring climate with satellites. Register today!

In the featured activity students use data from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). GOES provides real-time weather data for use in short-term weather forecasting, space environment monitoring, and research and development. POES primarily provides data for long-range weather forecasting, ensuring that non-visible data, for any region of Earth, are no more than six hours old.

Next Generation Science Standards addressed in this web seminar:

  • MS-ESS2 Earth's Systems

    • Science and Engineering Practices

      • Planning and Carrying Out Investigations
    • Disciplinary Core Ideas
    • The Roles of Water in Earth's Surface Processes
    • Weather and Climate
    • Crosscutting Concepts

      • Cause and Effect

Common Core Mathematics Standards addressed in this web seminar:

  • Grade 8

    • Statistics and Probability

Join us for this month's webinar on Wednesday, February 25th at 6pm EST (3pm PST, 1pm HST)

Ocean Acidification: A Virtual Lab and Tangible Solutions for High School Students

Presented by: Jason Hodin, Research Associate at Hopkins Marine Station and Staff Scientist and Media Designer for the Inquiry to Student Environmental Action (I2SEA) Team 

The VirtualUrchin and Inquiry-to-Insight (I2I) teams at Stanford University and the University of Gothenburg (Sweden) have developed "Our Acidifying Ocean", an interactive tutorial and virtual lab examining the impact of ocean acidification (OA) on the planktonic larva of the sea urchin.  After coming to appreciate the problems and challenges posed by OA, students are then encouraged to participate in the International Student Carbon Footprint Challenge (ISCFC), where secondary/high school students worldwide calculate their location-calibrated individual footprints, and share what they learned and envision solutions on the project's micro-blogging platform. Our Acidifying Ocean and an expanded ISCFC will form part of the core of a newly funded project by the same team just getting underway called I2SEA: Inquiry to Student Environmental Action.  I2SEA staff scientist and media designer Dr. Jason Hodin will lead an overview and walkthrough of these freely-available activities as well as the plans for the new project, with specific discussion of how to involve your students.
The Sharing Ocean Acidification Resources for Communicators and Educators webinar series is jointly sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries and Ocean Acidification Program.
Space is limited.

Reserve your Webinar seat now at:

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

Following the presentation there will be a few short informational announcements relevant to the ocean acidification communication community. Please forward this invitation to interested colleagues. We look forward to seeing you at this event!

More info on the series and upcoming webinars can be found here


This event is a Google Hangout and will be broadcast live on YouTube. Questions may be submitted during the Hangout using the comments section or via Twitter –use  #AskNICE

The AskNICE Professional Development events occurs every month on the third Thursday of the month from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM Eastern Time (US & Canada). Effective 11/21/2013 until 3/20/2014.  

Join us on Monday, March 2nd at 7:30 PM Eastern Time for: Western Water Resources, Climate, and Science

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar


Mark Twain famously noted that “whiskey is for drinking; water is for fighting over.” This is particularly true in the semi-arid western United States where the balance between water supply and water demand is nearly equal. Stress on the system is exacerbated by both human demands on the system but also climatevariability and change. Kevin Werner, NOAA’s Western Region Climate Services Director will describe the water resources environment in the Western United States including the impact of climate change. He will also describe his own experience working with decision makers in the water resources sector to utilize forecasts and science from NOAA to improve their operations. 

Following the webinar, there will be an informal discussion of the topics presented. All attendees are invited to participate. There are limited spaces for this discussion, information on joining will be provided during the event.

Please share this opportunity will all interested colleagues and Networks. 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar. Seriously, read the following and save it for reference:

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting at the start time.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting using VOIP, dial 1 (415) 655-0059 for audio. The access code is: 114-447-768. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: The ID Number for this Webinar is: 158-091-955

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to:

In this web seminar, you will learn to use satellite data from NASA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) missions in your meteorology lessons. You will be introduced to websites containing authentic GOES and POES data and imagery files and be shown how to download and use the files with students. 

Register today!

This NASA event is a Google Hangout and will be broadcast live on YouTube. Questions may be submitted during the Hangout using the comments section or via Twitter –use  #AskNICE

The AskNICE Professional Development events occurs every month on the third Thursday of the month from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM Eastern Time (US & Canada). Effective 11/21/2013 until 3/20/2014.  

Date: Wednesday, April 29, 2015
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

In July, 2012, the world witnessed a shocking event when widespread melting occurred over the surface of 97% of the Greenland Ice Sheet. According to ice core records, the last time such widespread melting occurred was in 1889. What caused such widespread melt? Was it just the warm temperatures, or is it a more complicated situation? Register today!

Dr. Mary Albert and her Dartmouth graduate students happened to be on the Greenland Ice Sheet at just the right time to gather some evidence. They excavated samples of the refrozen surface melt layer to take back to the U.S. for study, where their team investigated the physical, chemical, and isotopic aspects of that layer. They also looked deeper into the ice sheet and investigated evidence from firn (old snow) cores that contained melt layers dating back to 1889. They discovered that both in 2012 and in 1889, the warming and soot that changed the snow albedo (reflectivity) had both been necessary to synergistically create the melt; neither factor alone could have achieved melt in the cold, high, dry snow regions on the ice sheet.

Alden Adolph is now working with Mary on a project in New Hampshire to investigate climate change, snow albedo, and land use change on a project that is much closer to home. In Greenland, the soot from forest fires travels long distances to end up on the snow, where it changes the albedo. In New Hampshire, soot and aerosols can come from similar distant sources, but also from very local sources like wood stoves down the street. Alden will show how engineers and scientists use evidence to examine the importance of snow albedo even here in New England. Alden will also share ways in which she inspires younger students in the field, so that they can share in the excitement of research. Please join us for this relevant webinar, to learn how scientists used evidence from multiple sources to learn what caused the recent big melt, and why understanding your regional albedo is important to your future.


Title: Fire and Ice: Snow Albedo and Our Future
Target audience: K–12 educators
Date: Wednesday, April 29, 2015
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenter: Dr. Mary AlbertAlden AdolphLinda Morris


Register today to participate in this web seminar. Upon registering you will receive an e-mail confirmation including information about the program and suggested links to visit in preparation of the event. Additional information about the web seminar will be e-mailed to you days before the program.

Each web seminar is a unique, stand-alone, program. Archives of the web seminars and the presenters’ PowerPoint presentations will be available through the links on this web page. Learn more about the features of the web seminar and read answers to frequently asked questions from participants.


Where in the United States would the use of solar panels be most effective? This web seminar features the “Solar Cell Energy Availability From Around the Country” activity from MY NASA DATA. During this seminar you will become familiar with the activity by comparing the monthly averages of surface downward radiation in various locations around the United States and analyzing areas where the population would be more or less conducive to having solar panels. 

Register today!