A one day workshop for educators interested on learning to expand their climate change interpretation at their own institutions. Through a grant from NOAA, several institutions around the country have developed and thoroughly tested four storyboards that use visual aides to tell the story. Each storyboard has been developed keeping in mind how to effectively communicate climate change in a positive way that leads the listener to action. Lunch will be provided.

When, Where and Who

What

You can expect to gain:

  • Four visual narratives, suitable to be used on a spherical screen (such as Science on a Sphere®, Magic Planet®, or HyperGlobe®), flat screen, or handheld tablet.
  • Theory, based on social and cognitive sciences, used to develop the visual narratives.
  • Opportunities to practice and models for training other colleagues to use these materials.
  • A toolkit to take back to your institution - including the four visual narratives, background information about the theoretical basis for each narrative, relevant climate and ocean science information and videos that illustrate each visual narrative being used by an educator.

About Visualizing Change: Training and Tools to support Informal Educators

Visualizing Change is a 3-year grant funded by NOAA’s Office of Education to help build capacity in the informal science education field to more effectively use global data sets to communicate about climate change, its impact on coastal zones and marine life and how people are working to use scientific information to shape our world.

How

To register or for additional information, please email the contact person at your preferred location/date.

This is a FREE one-day workshop.  Lunch will be provided.  Participants are responsible for travel and parking costs. 

Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

What's the latest in Antarctic paleo-climate research? This web seminar, targeting educators of students in grades 7-12, will introduce participants to the nation's newest ice core expedition… SPICE Core! Investigators seeking data from the past 40,000 years are drilling a 1500 meter ice core to study chemical isotopes, tiny particles called aerosols and atmospheric gases trapped in earth's great southern ice sheet. The goal is to investigate environmental change since the last glacial/interglacial transition. Why was the South Pole targeted? What criteria affect the specific site selection for drilling? What new kinds of technology were required? Dr. T.J. Fudge will answer your questions, and share what it's like to work in the Pole's extreme environment. Register today!

A related, video-enhanced educational activity, focusing on "Polar Science and Engineering", will be presented by Linda Morris for you to share with your students. The interactions modeled in the video between scientists and engineers will serve as the basis of a reflective activity, Drilling Back Through Time, that introduce the students in your classroom to the NGSS's "Scientific and Engineering Practices". Educational resources from the US Ice Drilling Program will be showcased.

Details

Title: SPICE Core: Investigating Past Climate at the South Pole
Target audience: Educators of students in grades 7-12
Date: Wednesday, December 10, 2014 
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenters: Dr. T. J. Fudge and Linda M. Morris

Underwritten by the U.S. Ice Drilling Program Office and the National Science Foundation
 

This event is a Google Hangout and will be broadcast live on YouTube. Questions may be submitted during the Hangout using the comments section or via Twitter –use  #AskNICE

The AskNICE Professional Development events occurs every month on the third Thursday of the month from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM Eastern Time (US & Canada). Effective 11/21/2013 until 3/20/2014.  

May 29th, 2014 12:00 to 1:00 PM ET

Climate change in the Great Lakes region and beyond is expected to promote shifts in the ranges and phenology of well-known plant and animal species. These shifts are often a result of changes in the availability of food and shelter, as well as temperature. Knowing more about these potential impacts will help wildlife managers and nature enthusiasts alike to adapt to and potentially mitigate some of the resulting changes in wildlife diversity.

This webinar will cover:

  • an overview of potential climate change impacts on wildlife
  • effects of a changing climate on the phenology of migratory birds
  • impacts of shifting climate conditions (such as drought and flooding) on the vulnerability of species of special concern
  • climate change effects on Broad-tailed Hummingbirds as a result of shifts in the timing of flowering of their nectar flowers glacier lily, dwarf larkspur, and Indian paintbrush, which they rely on during spring migration

The webinar is free. To register click here. Once registered, you will receive a confirmation email with log-in information.

 

Agenda

Welcome and Introduction: Jill Jentes Banicki, Ohio Sea Grant

Assessing the Vulnerability of Wildlife to Climate Change: Benjamin Zuckerberg, Dept of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, UW-Madison

Climate Change Effects on Broad-tailed Hummingbirds: Amy Iler, Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Maryland and The Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory

Question/Answer and Wrap Up

Discussion: Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions via a live chat after the presentation.

 

Visit changingclimate.osu.edu to view previous webinars and other climate resources.

A one day workshop for educators interested on learning to expand their climate change interpretation at their own institutions. Through a grant from NOAA, several institutions around the country have developed and thoroughly tested four storyboards that use visual aides to tell the story. Each storyboard has been developed keeping in mind how to effectively communicate climate change in a positive way that leads the listener to action. Lunch will be provided.

When, Where and Who

April 14 - National Aquarium, Baltimore, MD – Megan Anderson manderson@aqua.org

What

You can expect to gain:

  • Four visual narratives, suitable to be used on a spherical screen (such as Science on a Sphere®, Magic Planet®, or HyperGlobe®), flat screen, or handheld tablet.
  • Theory, based on social and cognitive sciences, used to develop the visual narratives.
  • Opportunities to practice and models for training other colleagues to use these materials.
  • A toolkit to take back to your institution - including the four visual narratives, background information about the theoretical basis for each narrative, relevant climate and ocean science information and videos that illustrate each visual narrative being used by an educator.

About Visualizing Change: Training and Tools to support Informal Educators

Visualizing Change is a 3-year grant funded by NOAA’s Office of Education to help build capacity in the informal science education field to more effectively use global data sets to communicate about climate change, its impact on coastal zones and marine life and how people are working to use scientific information to shape our world.

How

To register or for additional information, please email the contact person at your preferred location/date.

January session: Thursday, Jan 15th- 4:30-5:45pm ET 

Although 97% of active climate scientists agree that the earth is warming due to human activities, some polls have found that only 44% of American share this view. As an educator, you are likely to encounter people who have received information that conflicts with the accepted climate science, perhaps from sources that they trust. This session will help you better understand American's perceptions of climate change and provide tips for better communicating climate science.

Click here on the day of the event to connect to the Ask US session. (You can access this page about 10 minutes before the start)

This event is a Google Hangout and will be broadcast live on YouTube. Questions may be submitted during the Hangout using the comments section or via Twitter –use  #AskUS

Online Educator Professional Development on Earth System Science Topics from ESTEEM (Earth Systems, Technology and Energy Education for MUREP –Minority University Research and Education Program)

 

This NASA event is a Google Hangout and will be broadcast live on YouTube. Questions may be submitted during the Hangout using the comments section or via Twitter –use  #AskNICE

The AskNICE Professional Development events occurs every month on the third Thursday of the month from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM Eastern Time (US & Canada). Effective 11/21/2013 until 3/20/2014.  

Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

Join NSTA for this web seminar on July 10 and learn how the Learning Center—NSTA's e-PD portal with over 11,600 resources, a community of like-minded individuals, and professional learning tools—can help you enhance and extend your content and pedagogical knowledge of Earth and Space Science science topics.Register today!

 

This program is designed for educators of grades K-12. The seminar's discussion will focus on resources related to the topics of Earth, Sun, and Moon and the The Solar System. An archive and related PowerPoint presentation will be available at the end of the program.

Details

Title: Enhance Your Content and Pedagogical Knowledge Using NSTA Resources: Earth and Space Science
Target audience: K - 12 teachers
Date: Thursday, July 10, 2014
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenter: Don Boonstra

This webinar is underwritten by the GE Foundation.  NOAA is a Content Collaborator of NSTA's Learning Center



 

In this web seminar, you will learn to use satellite data from NASA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) missions in your meteorology lessons. You will be introduced to websites containing authentic GOES and POES data and imagery files and be shown how to download and use the files with students. 

Register today!

A one day workshop for educators interested on learning to expand their climate change interpretation at their own institutions. Through a grant from NOAA, several institutions around the country have developed and thoroughly tested four storyboards that use visual aides to tell the story. Each storyboard has been developed keeping in mind how to effectively communicate climate change in a positive way that leads the listener to action. Lunch will be provided.

When, Where and Who

April 28 - Buttonwood Park Zoo, New Bedford, MA – Annette Brickley abrickley.edu@gmail.com

 

What

You can expect to gain:

  • Four visual narratives, suitable to be used on a spherical screen (such as Science on a Sphere®, Magic Planet®, or HyperGlobe®), flat screen, or handheld tablet.
  • Theory, based on social and cognitive sciences, used to develop the visual narratives.
  • Opportunities to practice and models for training other colleagues to use these materials.
  • A toolkit to take back to your institution - including the four visual narratives, background information about the theoretical basis for each narrative, relevant climate and ocean science information and videos that illustrate each visual narrative being used by an educator.

 

About Visualizing Change: Training and Tools to support Informal Educators

Visualizing Change is a 3-year grant funded by NOAA’s Office of Education to help build capacity in the informal science education field to more effectively use global data sets to communicate about climate change, its impact on coastal zones and marine life and how people are working to use scientific information to shape our world.

How

To register or for additional information, please email the contact person at your preferred location/date.

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