The third National Climate Assessment (NCA) report, released May 6, 2014, is the most comprehensive look at climate change impacts in the United States to date. Based on years of work by hundreds of diverse experts, the NCA (http://nca2014.globalchange.gov/) confirms that climate change is affecting us – and the natural resources we rely on – right now. Join authors of NCA chapters on Ecosystems, Forests, and Adaptation together with representatives from the U.S. Global Change Research Program and the NCA Indicator System to discuss key findings and implications for managers.

 The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Wildlife Federation have developed a series of web conferences to increase communication and transfer of technical information between conservation professionals regarding the increasing challenges from climate change. This program is being facilitated by the USFWS's National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) Applied Landscape Conservation Team.

A partnership between the National Wildlife Federation and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Monday, March 7th at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project welcomes Dr. T.J. Fudge, Paleoclimate Researcher, University of Washington, and Ms. Louise Huffman, Education Program Manager, US Ice Drilling Program as their featured speakers this month.

What's the latest in Antarctic paleo-climate research? Tune in to learn about the nation's newest ice core expedition...SPICE Core (South Pole Ice Core)! Investigators seeking data from the past 40,000 years are drilling a 1500 meter ice core to study chemical isotopes, tiny particles called aerosols and atmospheric gases trapped in the earth's great southern ice sheet. The goal is to investigate environmental change since the last glacial/inter-glacial transition.

Why was the South Pole targeted? What criteria affect the specific site selection for drilling? What new kinds of technology were required? Dr. T.J. Fudge will answer your questions, and share the latest from his work in the Pole's extreme environment.

Educational resources from the US Ice Drilling Program will be showcased by IDPO’s Education Program Manager, Louise Huffman.

Important Information for participating in this Webinar -
 
Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial 1-(213)-929-4212 for audio. The access code is: 234-544-393. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 128-311-523

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to our Web page

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to our Listserv

Gain the tools needed to quickly ramp up to the Next Generation Science Standards* in a workshop that combines climate science, systems thinking, and science communications skills through media production. Tackle your media anxieties and tap into the excitement around media production, using easy-to-use lesson plans that bring student media production into any instructional environment.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: Friday, March 1, 2013

Join them for this self-paced online course (Massive Open Online Course, MOOC).  The course will run over 4.5 weeks requiring a total of 20-25 hours to complete, start date is April 1, 2015.

Why is water at the heart of so much conflict in the American West? How have major cities and extensive agricultural systems been able to thrive in the Western United States despite most of the region being either a desert or semi-desert environment? How will a warming climate affect the availability and use of water in a region populated by tens of millions of people?

Join us in exploring these and other questions as we combine an overview of the science behind water and climate in the Western US with a survey of the major legal, political, and cultural issues focused on this precious resource.

You will hear from over 15 experts in water management, policy, and research in the West. We will start with history, politics and culture of water development in the Western US (module 1) and hydrology, water demand and climate in the Western US (module 2) before we dive into a case study around the Colorado River Basin (module 3) and explore controversial water issues (module 4).

This course will include many resources for educators. Educators can earn professional development credit by signing up for an parallel two credit hours course at the cost of $140.

This course is free and open to the public.  Register now!

 

Anne Gold, Associate Scientist and Science Educator, CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

Eric Gordon, Managing Director of Western Water Assessment, CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

In this webinar, Climate Change LIVE partners highlight professional development programs to empower you as a climate change educator!  Each program offers training to increase your understanding of essential climate concepts and provide you with the tools and resources to implement a science-based climate change curriculum in your classroom and connect with networks of other educators teaching about climate change.  Most of these programs offer grants to schools to help them implement climate change solution-related action projects, and include on-site and online training opportunities.

Presenters: Will Steger Foundation, NOAA, Alliance for Climate Education, ACE 

Session topics focus on sharing tested models and strategies for effectively teaching this topic in undergraduate courses. Each participant will contribute tested teaching materials and strategies and participate in the development and review of classroom resources that take advantage of cutting edge technology and pedagogy.

Application deadline - March 1, 2013

Wednesday, February 18th – 4:00pm PT/7:00pm ET

The National Climate Assessment, released in May of 2014, summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, touching on many disciplines: earth science, biology, human health, engineering, technology, economics, and policy. Explore the document with a lead NCA author, then learn about related educator resources with Minda Berbeco from the National Center for Science Education. Discover how to bring these resources into classroom lessons, engage students in data collection and analysis, share visualizations and citizen science projects. 

Focus this month will be on the Southwest region. Watch for additional regions to be featured in upcoming “Ask US” sessions.

The opportunities and pathways for careers in natural resources and sustainability areas are diverse and the conversation between employers and higher education is only just beginning. This workshop will focus on articulating the breadth of opportunities and identifying the knowledge and skills that are pathways to different types of employment.

Application Deadline: February 22, 2013

Application deadline is Monday, March 16, 2015

The National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation announces a professional development opportunity for interpreters who focus on climate change and ocean issues.

About the National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI)

NNOCCI is a collaborative effort led by the New England Aquarium with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, the FrameWorks Institute, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the National Aquarium in Baltimore, Monterey Bay Aquarium, the New Knowledge Organization in partnership with Pennsylvania State University and the Ohio's Center for Science and Industry. With support from the NSF Climate Change Education Partnership program, NNOCCI's goal is to establish a national network of professionals who are skilled in communicating climate science to the American public in ways that are engaging and stimulate productive dialog.

What is a Study Circle? 
A NNOCCI Study Circle is a cross-disciplinary learning group made up of peers with expertise from fields of professional interpretation, climate and ocean sciences and communications and cultural sciences. Through a series of facilitated in-person meetings, webinars, conference calls and practical activities, participants build knowledge of ocean and climate science and communications and cultural sciences. They apply lessons learned to communications or educational opportunities in the context of their work environment through several cycles of development, practice, sharing and reflection. Participants continue to build knowledge of ocean and climate science and communications and cultural sciences throughout the Study Circle, and gain resources and materials to train staff, volunteers, and other audiences at their home institutions.

The Study Circle has two major phases. During the first six months participants engage in a formal, facilitated learning process. Upon graduating participants join the larger network of colleagues and continue to experiment, evaluate and share successes from their work with each other. Through the Study Circle, participants will learn about the latest findings in climate science and oceanography and how to apply these to interpretive contexts in their home institutions. In addition participants build trust and lasting bonds among colleagues from multiple institutions who share an interest in developing effective ways to engage audiences in learning about climate and ocean change.

Who is the Study Circle for?
The Study Circle is intended for pairs of staff members from informal learning centers such as zoos, aquariums, science centers, National Parks, natural preserves, and other institutions that have an interest in coastal or ocean issues.

Costs and Compensation:
NNOCCI will pay for direct costs1 for participation in Study Circle activities that are not also part of participants' routine work. This includes travel, lodging and food for in-person meetings. NNOCCI will also provide a $3,000 stipend2 to up to 10 institutions which support two staff members to participate in the Study Circle.

Key Criteria:
Applicants should have institutional support before they apply. The institution should meet the following criteria:

  • Have an ocean or coastal ecology  connection within their work.
  • Have regular interpretation programming led by staff and/or volunteers.
  • Have interest in addressing issues related to climate change.
  • Be willing to support two staff members to fully participate in both the learning and evaluation phases of the Study Circle. Each applicant must fill out their own separate application.
  • Be willing to support NNOCCI’s evaluation efforts, which will entail an onsite visitor survey that the two staff members or volunteers will collect after presentations or other education programming. This survey effort will take place twice: 1) in the months immediately before the Study Circle meetings, and 2) six months after the training is complete.

Criteria for individual participants:

  • Able to commit to 3 in-person meetings (see dates, below) and about 3 hours/week of Study Circle work from approximately August 2015 through December 2015.
  • Able to commit to coordinating one-page visitor impact surveys at your institution several months prior to the first Study Circle and in the six months following the last Study Circle meeting.
  • Have regular opportunities to apply information and learning from the Study Circle through professional responsibilities such as interpretation for visitors, written communications, educational programming or presenting training for colleagues or volunteer interpreters.
  • Have supervisor support for full participation in the Study Circle.
  • Have a colleague who meets all of the criteria above as a co-applicant.

In Person Meeting Dates:*

Study Circle 'A'

  • September 16 and 17, 2015 (Boston, MA)
  • October 28 and 29, 2015 (Woods Hole, MA)
  • December 2 and 3, 2015 (location to be announced)

Study Circle 'B'

  • September 23 and 24, 2015 (Boston, MA)
  • November 4 and 5, 2015 (Woods Hole, MA)
  • December 9 and 10, 2015 (location to be announced)

*Please note that we are offering two distinct study circle options for Fall 2015. You and your partner must commit to the same study circle dates. If these dates do not fit for you and your institution, please note that additional Study Circles are being planned for and Spring and Fall 2016. 

How to apply:

Both applicants from an institution should submit a separate application. Click here to fill out the online application. Application deadline is Monday, March 16, 2015.

Please email nnocci@neaq.org with questions or concerns.

Consider joining MADE-CLEAR on a five-day professional development experience on climate change and its solutions led by experts in climate science and educational researchers. You will explore the science of climate change through activities, inquiry, and small group work on curriculum.  The Academy will be held at the University of Delaware’s Virden Center.

 

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