Thursday, May 5, from 6:30 to 8:00 pm Eastern time to learn about weather and the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission.

Types of weather, weather basics, extreme weather, monitoring extreme weather with satellites, and hands on investigations for students to collect data about weather- including GLOBE protocols, are topics that will be covered during this seminar. The presenters will also talk about the difference between weather and climate and will describe ground validation campaigns.

The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is an international satellite mission (NASA and JAXA) to provide next-generation observations of rain and snow. The GPM mission will help advance our understanding of Earth's water and energy cycles, improve the forecasting of extreme events that cause natural disasters, and extend current capabilities of using satellite precipitation information to directly benefit society. 

All participants will receive a certificate of participation and 100 Learning Center activity points for attending and completing the post-program evaluation. An archive and presentation slides will be available at the end of the program. 

Please visit the main web page of this program to see the description and find links to the biographical information about the presenter(s).

Grades: Elemntary, Middle and High

 

This program featured:

  • Presentation by the award-winning Alliance for Climate Education (ACE)
  • Student moderators and panel discussions
  • Videos of student-led projects from across the country
  • Student perspectives that will lead to the conversation in the second webcast

A recording is available.

September 3, 2015 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM EDT

As part of the climate change goal, DOE is planning to host eight Regional Climate Change Impact Webinars as part of the MIE initiative. We are looking to host speakers who will discuss regional efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change impacts as they relate to the President's Climate Action Plan with a particular focus on engaging minority communities. 

Experts will provide findings from the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER), energy job strategies, and the National Climate Impact Assessment. As part of the QER discussion, we plan to share climate-based findings related to national security, resilience, the grid of the future, environment, grid siting, and shared transport. This discussion will outline federal energy policy objectives, proposals, and actions, particularly as they relate to climate change and resilience for underserved communities. For more information on the QER, please visit http://energy.gov/epsa/quadrennial-energy-review-qer. 

An expert on energy and climate change job strategies will discuss job opportunities by region as well as regional options for renewables and energy efficiency. We will share region-specific information about the energy workforce across a variety of energy sectors and experience levels. 

The final section of the webinar will focus on findings from the National Climate Assessment and their regional applicability to those communities who are disproportionally impacted by the effects of climate change. We hope to host regional experts who can share Assessment findings and provide potential tools for resilience among minority and tribal communities.

This course explores the science of climate change. Students will learn how the climate system works; what factors cause climate to change across different time scales and how those factors interact; how climate has changed in the past; how scientists use models, observations and theory to make predictions about future climate; and the possible consequences of climate change for our planet. The course explores evidence for changes in ocean temperature, sea level and acidity due to global warming. Students will learn how climate change today is different from past climate cycles and how satellites and other technologies are revealing the global signals of a changing climate. Finally, the course looks at the connection between human activity and the current warming trend and considers some of the potential social, economic and environmental consequences of climate change.

 

Authoring Scientists

Ed Mathez, Geologist

Gavin Schmidt, Climatologist
 
Drew Shindell, Climatologist

 

Key Science Concepts

The Sun is the primary source of energy for Earth's climate system. The Earth's energy is in balance, or equilibrium, when Earth emits the same amount of energy as it absorbs.

The climate system is dynamic and has many interrelated components. A change in any one component can influence the equilibrium of the system and result in climate changes.

Climate varies over space and time through both natural and human sources. These forces operate over time periods ranging from years to hundreds of millions or even billions of years and vary widely with location on Earth.

Human activities – particularly the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide since the Industrial Revolution – are affecting the climate system today, leading to warming temperatures globally.

Evidence for variations in past climates is held in ocean and lake sediments, ice cores, corals, tree rings, and other geologic records. Understanding past climate informs us about how the present climate system works and how it might change in the future.

Climate change will have consequences for the Earth system including human society. Climate change research involves extensive observations, theory and modeling. Future climate change scenarios are essential to informing efforts to mitigate and to adapt to the consequences of climate change.

Graduate Credit

This course is approved for graduate credit and continuing education units from leading institutions at an additional cost.

 

 

Looking for fun, hands-on activities to engage your visitors, students and community on the topic of climate change?  Come to the New England Aquarium for a FREE training about these activities and climate change education. 

This training is ideal for classroom teachers and informal educators from various institutions hoping to engage students and adults around the topic of climate change. 

Monday, June 6 at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

The Climate Stories Project (CSP) is an educational and artistic forum for sharing stories about personal and community responses to climate change. Through CSP workshops students learn how to engage with climate change through people’s stories, rather than just through the lens of science. In the workshops, students prepare, carry out, and record interviews with local and remote interviewees about their diverse responses to climate change. Students learn to speak with each other about climate change, develop interviewing and editing skills, and create and share original digital storytelling projects. In this presentation you'll learn about the background, goals, methods, and structure of CSP education workshops, and how to integrate them into your existing curriculum. To find out more about CSP, visit climatestoriesproject.org
 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar - Seriously, read the following and save it for your reference: 

  • Log into the webinar AT LEAST 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial 1-(562)-247-8422 for audio. The access code is: 295-545-703. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 119-255-931

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to our Web page 

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to our Listserv

This month's webinar will build on the theme of Earth's Energy Budget with an investigation into clouds and their role in Earth's climate system. Participants will learn about resources from the Students' Cloud Observations On-Line, or S'COOL, program that allows students to practice cloud identification and submit observations to NASA as citizen scientists. Participants will also take a closer look at posters and interactive features created using data from the CERES instrument that is aboard a variety of NASA satellites.

Certificates of professional development hours are available upon request. Additional session dates will be announced soon.

Please join us on Tuesday, September 1st at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project is pleased to present Lyndsey Manzo and Barbara Ikalainen for our September, 2015 webinar. Lyndsey and Barbara will discuss how they developed walking tours integrating innovative signage and mobile handheld technologies to teach students, educators and members of the public more about their local environments and the impacts of climate change. 

Lyndsey will present "The Climate Walk" - part of the Ohio State University’s Stone Laboratory student field trip program on Gibraltar Island in the western basin of Lake Erie – which consists of eight strategically placed stations that align with the Essential Principles of Climate Literacy and are accompanied by hands-on approaches to learning about climate change. This interactive place-based journey allows students to explore the impacts of climate change on their local environment, and provides educators with the ability to provide "on the fly" customized content in engaging formats. The Climate Walk is a model that can be replicated and used by formal and informal science educators in regions across the US. 

Barbara will present the process and outcomes of her NOAA Climate Stewards Grant "The North Shore Climate Awareness Project - Why Trees Matter". Barbara created an interactive walking tour of the 10 most interesting tree species on her college campus, posting signs and QR codes on trees allowing students, faculty and the public to instantly access detailed descriptions of that tree species, their carbon sequestration capabilities, and how they will be impacted by climate change in that region.
 

Please share this opportunity will ALL interested colleagues and networks.

 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar. Seriously, read the following and save it for reference: 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial +1 (562) 247-8321 for audio. The access code is: 597-874-782. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 120-411-787

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

 

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to our Listserv at: 

https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/noaaclimatestewards/

6-7:00pm ET/3-4:00pm PT

The GLOBE Program  originally developed posters and activities for teachers to help students explore the concepts of Earth as a system, find patterns and connections between and among maps containing different environmental data, and to understand the relationship between time and space in regard to global environmental data.

In 2014, a digital GLOBE Earth system ePoster is now provided by the MY NASA DATA project to extend the opportunities for learning. This digital poster provides data for 2005 through 2013 and enables interactive exploration of the data in more detail through the use of animations. The animations can be used with students to find patterns among different environmental data, understand the relationship among different environmental parameters, and understand how the data changes seasonally and over longer time scales.

In this interactive educator webinar, Tina Harte, education specialist at NASA Langley Research Center and former middle school science teacher, will explore the ePoster and activities will be discussed for K-12 students, with a focus on those meeting NGSS performance expectations, science practices and cross-cutting concepts related to Earth System Science.

July 31 to August 1- ONLINE SESSIONS
August 5-6 - SESSIONS at NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Columbia University in New York City 
Graduate Credit Option: University of Michigan-Flint
 
Climate Change in the Classroom is a professional development event for 8th – 12th grade English, Math, Science and Social Studies teachers. The workshop sponsors, GISS, Columbia University, the Science Museum of Minnesota, University of Michigan-Flint, Real World Matters and Mindblue Productions, invite teachers to explore the science underlying global climate change in today's headlines with researchers on the frontlines of advancing knowledge.  A special focus will be developing climate literacy to evaluate energy solutions for mitigating global climate change.  Guided by education faculty, teachers will pilot a new curriculum - Hot: One World, One Climate. CCIC will involve teachers in a learning experience that will deepen understanding about how students learn science, build strategies for using climate change topics as a context for science and math instruction, and facilitate student learning through problem-solving, inquiry and an engaging role-play simulation.            
 
Learn More and Apply @ http://www.giss.nasa.gov/meetings/

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