Presented by: Second Nature in partnership with the American Meteorological Society (AMS)

Join AMS & Second Nature for a webinar aimed at promoting the importance of basic climate science education at Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs).

This webinar will provide an overview of:
• The AMS Climate Studies Diversity Project, its eligibility requirements and application process 
• Previous Diversity Project participants’ experiences, and opportunities for Minority-Serving Institutions
• How to integrate the AMS Climate Studies Diversity Project and the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) for campus sustainability planning 

Panelists:
• James Brey – Director, AMS Education Program 
• Jason Szymanski – Professor of Chemistry & Geosciences, Monroe Community College 
• John Warford– Professor of Geography, Florida Agricultural & Mechanical University 
• Van Du – ACUPCC Program Manager, Second Nature 

 

Funded by NSF

Monday, September 8, 2014 at 7:30 Eastern Time

Mark McCaffrey, Director of Collaborative Partnerships at the National Center for Science Education, is the featured speaker this month for the Climate Stewards project. He will address the questions: How can we best provide learners with authentic data and current research into climate changes that are already occurring in the United States? What is the National ClimateAssessment and how can I use its resources in my classroom? What are some of the best online resources for teaching about climate challenges and energy responses, and how do they tie to the Next Generation Science Standards? In his presentation, Mark will provide an overview of the learning pathways developed for educators that help them unpack the National Climate Assessment. He will also highlight insights for educators from his book Climate Smart & Energy Wise including how to address doubt, denial and despair when teaching about these challenging topics. 

Following Mark's presentation, Cindy Schmidt, Director of NCAR's Climate Voices Science Speakers Network will provide an overview of the project which works bring climate scientists directly in touch with students and members of the community to discuss the local effects of a changing climate and possible ways to address impacts.

Please forward this invitation to all interested colleagues and networks

The Fine Print: Important Notes for participating in the Webinar

  • Plan to log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software and we want to be sure you are able to access the meeting at the assigned start time.    
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this Webinar. If you elect to use the phone number provided for audio +1 (951) 266-6126, access code: 546-482-116, you will be charged for a long distance call. You do not need an Audio Pin number to listen to the meeting.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 851-182-978

Wednesday, March 23: 10:00 am Pacific | 11:00 am Mountain | 12:00 pm Central | 1:00 pm Eastern

This webinar will provide an opportunity to hear from geoscience faculty who connect the use of data and earth modeling to learning about the Earth in their courses. Becca Walker and Beth Pratt-Sitaula are the author and editor (respectively) of Ice Mass and Sea Level Changes, a UNAVCO-developed, geodesy-focused GETSI module that uses authentic geodetic data to introduce students to the scientific and societal aspects of sea level change. Kirsten Menking is the author of the InTeGrate module: Earth Modeling(coming live in the Fall) that develops students' qualitative and quantitative tools for constructing, experimenting with, and interpreting dynamic models of different components of the Earth system. The webinar will include presentations on specific teaching strategies/tools and will provide opportunities for discussion. Participants are encouraged to both ask questions of the presenters and discuss their own experiences of using data to teach about societally important issues.

For more information on the series and to learn more about InTeGrate visit: http://serc.carleton.edu/integrate/workshops/index.htm

Dr. Kathleen Tierney, Director of the CU Boulder’s Natural Hazards Center and Dr. Kevin Trenberth from the Climate Analysis Section at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) will join facilitators Dr. Anne Gold of CIRES and Deb Morrison of University Colorado Boulder in an interactive panel discussion. 

These experts will discuss how scientists can forecast where extreme events will occur and their severity. They will cover what communities and governments  can do to increase resiliency to extreme weather events and how the scientific community can help prepare citizens and government. 

Gain the tools needed to quickly ramp up to the Next Generation Science Standards* in a workshop that combines climate science, systems thinking, and science communications skills through media production. Tackle your media anxieties and tap into the excitement around media production, using easy-to-use lesson plans that bring student media production into any instructional environment.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: Friday, March 1, 2013

In this web seminar we will explore the use of computer models for generating projections about the future of Earth's climate. The presenters will demonstrate the Very, Very Simple Climate Model—free educational software that enables students to try out "what if" scenarios about changes to our planet's climate during the coming century. Participating educators will learn about the scientific basis of this simple model, derived from observations (ice core data) of past climates during recent ice ages.

Register today!

Presenters: Scott Denning and Randy Russell

NSTA continues to explore the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) by presenting a web seminar series focusing on the disciplinary core ideas. The spring series features four informative and interactive web seminars on life science and engineering design. Visit the web seminar series page to access archives of web seminars on physical science and Earth and space science.

The web seminar on the disciplinary core idea of Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics addresses questions such as "How do organisms interact with the living and nonliving environments to obtain matter and energy?" and "How do matter and energy move through an ecosystem?"

This web seminar will provide guidance on:

  • which concepts are central to understanding ecosystems
  • how students' understanding of ecosystems might progress over their K-12 education
  • how students can engage in the scientific and engineering practices to gain an understanding of these ideas
  • what instruction might look like in the classroom

 

Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenters: Andy Anderson and Jennifer Doherty

October 6, 2014 at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

Our Featured speaker is Dr. Richard Alley, Evan Pugh Professor of Geosciences and Associate of the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute at The Pennsylvania State University. He will be giving our main presentation Bungy Jumping off the Ice-Core Roller Coaster: Ice-Core Records of Global Warming and Abrupt Climate Change

Dr. Alley will discuss how ice cores provide remarkably accurate records of climate changes locally, regionally and globally. Ice-core records of ice age cycles contribute to our understanding that CO2 has been “the biggest control knob” of Earth’s overall climate, and thus that if we continue burning fossil fuels and releasing the CO2, we will have large impacts on climate. But, ice-core records also show how changes in ocean circulation have had large, rapid regional impacts. The existence of such abrupt climate changes contributes to our understanding that, if scientists are wrong about the influence of CO2 on climate, changes are likely to be more-damaging than expected rather than less-damaging. 

Please forward this invitation to all interested colleagues and networks

Dates & Times: Fri and Sat, April 22nd and 23rd, 2016. 8:30 am - 5:00 pm pst

NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project (CSEP) is collaborating with Federal, State and NGO partners to convene four climate-science workshops for formal and informal educators. Participants will hear from and interact with climate science, education and communication experts, and visit research facilities to explore foundational technologies and innovations in Earth-system research. This workshop in Long Beach, California will focus on the region and topical impacts of climate change, with a goal of connecting educators and their students/audiences to the best-available, science-based information and resources about climate change.

Registration for the Long Beach, California workshop is open, however there are attendance limits for the workshop, and we are advertising them nationally.  Availability will be on a first come first serve basis, so register early for your workshop. Participation in the workshops is free, but attendees are responsible for arranging their own transportation, lodging and meals unless otherwise indicated in workshop details.  

Place:

Aquarium of the Pacific

100 Aquarium Way

Long Beach, CA 90807

Primary Contacts:  

Alie LeBeau (alebeau@lbaop.org)

Gabrielle Dorr (gabrielle.dorr@noaa.gov)

Molly Harrison (Molly.Harrison@noaa.gov)

Featured Presentations

  • Climate 101

  • Sea Level Rise

  • El Nino Data and impacts on Fisheries

  • Introduction to Colorado Lagoon

Featured Activities

  • Exploration of Science on a Sphere

  • Hands-on activities from USC SeaGrant

  • Field Trip to Colorado Lagoon:

  • Water quality testing

  • Beach seining

  • Restoration planting

Notes - Workshop Costs, Food & Lodging:

  • This workshop has a capacity for 25 participants.

  • There is no cost to attend this workshop. Participants will receive a ($50-$100) stipend for participation in both days,

  • Participants must make their own travel and overnight arrangements.

  • A nearby lodging option is Hyatt Regency Long Beach at 200 S. Pine St. (562) 491-1234

  • There will be a field trip to a local wetland area as part to this workshop on Saturday April 23. Participants will be responsible for their own transportation from the Aquarium of the Pacific to the field trip site.

  • Coffee and lunch will be provided on both workshop days.

Josh Sniedeman is this year’s Department of Energy’s Einstein Science Educator Fellow.  He will introduce the Energy Literacy Essential Principles developed with the goal of building an energy literate public. In addition, we will introduce the Will Steger Foundation’s Experience Energy Curriculum and Mike Arquin, founder of Kidwind will demonstrate one of Kidwind’s many great activities.

 

 

Josh Sniedeman Josh Sniedeman is the current Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow for the Department of Energy – a distinction awarded to outstanding k-12 STEM educators. Sniedeman will be guiding us through an in-depth look at energy literacy and what it means for educators.
 


Michael ArquinMichael Arquin is the Founder and Director of KidWind, a leading resource for hands-on, classroom-friendly renewable energy projects. KidWind curricula and classroom wind-turbine kits are used by educators around the country and across many grade levels. Arquin will share with us some of their most-popular activities.
 
Attendees will also be introduced to Experience Energy, a curriculum developed by the Will Steger Foundation to engage elementary and middle school students in Minnesota energy literacy.

 

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