Looking for fun, hands-on activities to engage your visitors, students and community on the topic of climate change?  Come to the New England Aquarium for a FREE training about these activities and climate change education. 

This training is ideal for classroom teachers and informal educators from various institutions hoping to engage students and adults around the topic of climate change. 

July 31 to August 1- ONLINE SESSIONS
August 5-6 - SESSIONS at NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Columbia University in New York City 
Graduate Credit Option: University of Michigan-Flint
 
Climate Change in the Classroom is a professional development event for 8th – 12th grade English, Math, Science and Social Studies teachers. The workshop sponsors, GISS, Columbia University, the Science Museum of Minnesota, University of Michigan-Flint, Real World Matters and Mindblue Productions, invite teachers to explore the science underlying global climate change in today's headlines with researchers on the frontlines of advancing knowledge.  A special focus will be developing climate literacy to evaluate energy solutions for mitigating global climate change.  Guided by education faculty, teachers will pilot a new curriculum - Hot: One World, One Climate. CCIC will involve teachers in a learning experience that will deepen understanding about how students learn science, build strategies for using climate change topics as a context for science and math instruction, and facilitate student learning through problem-solving, inquiry and an engaging role-play simulation.            
 
Learn More and Apply @ http://www.giss.nasa.gov/meetings/

 Friday, April 17 at 1:00 PM EDT

In this webinar, a panel of Arctic experts will present the booklet and outline how climate changes currently underway in the Arctic are a driver for global sea-level rise, offer new prospects for natural resource extraction, and have rippling effects through the world’s weather, climate, food supply and economy. The webinar will feature a presentation and Q&A session with:

Julie Brigham-Grette, Professor of Quaternary/Glacial Geology at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, Chair of the National Research Council’s Polar Research Board, and Co-Chair of the authoring committee of Lessons and Legacies of International Polar Year 2007-2008.

Stephanie Pfirman, Professor of Environmental Sciences at Barnard College and Co-Chair of the authoring committee of The Arctic in the Anthropocene: Emerging Research Questions.

James White, Director of the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, Professor of Geological Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and Chair of the authoring committee of Abrupt Impacts of Climate Change: Anticipating Surprises.

 

Arctic Matters: The Global Connection to Changes in the Arctic

Download the Booklet PDF

Register for the webinar

Interactive website — coming soon!

This booklet is an educational resource from the National Research Council’s Polar Research Board that introduces the threats and opportunities of the Arctic’s rapidly changing environment and explains why the Arctic matters — to all of us.

Viewed in satellite images as a jagged white coat draped over the top of the globe, the high Arctic appears distant and isolated. But even if you don’t live there, don’t do business there, and will never travel there, you are closer to the Arctic than you think.

Arctic Matters: The Global Connection to Changes in the Arctic draws on a large collection of peer-reviewed National Research Council reports and other national and international reports to provide a brief, reader-friendly primer on the complex ways in which the changes currently affecting the Arctic and its diverse people, resources, and environment can, in turn, affect the entire globe.

 

Monday, October 5th at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

 

To view an archive of the broadcast, go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tv7_wm6ru4M&feature=youtu.be

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project is proud to welcome Dr. Alexander E. “Sandy” MacDonald as the featured speaker for our October webinar. Dr. MacDonald is Director of NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory, and the Chief Science Advisor for NOAA Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

Dr. Alexander will discuss a national energy simulator developed by a team at NOAA that uses highly detailed weather and electric load data to determine the role that various energy sources could play in the coming decades. This “energy system simulator” can use any source of energy (coal, nuclear, wind, solar etc.) over the US 48 states, and includes a potential national High-Voltage-Direct-Current transmission network, allowing power to be shared over the domain. The simulator identifies cost-minimized geographic configurations of power plants that could continuously and reliably supply electricity over all parts of the country. 

A 2030 simulation that limits carbon emission intensity to levels found in today’s natural gas power plants, and includes a national HVDC network, would lower US electric sector emissions by up to 80%, keeping costs about the same as today. The transportation and heating and air conditioning sectors will need to have much higher levels of electric usage to realize the full potential of decarbonizing energy. The studies carried out by Dr. Alexander’s team show that this approach is feasible for the major world carbon emitters, including the US, China and Europe. There is a potential path to transforming the global energy system to much lower carbon emissions by the 2030s without major economic harm. 


Cost Optimized Realization of the US Power Generation System in 2013

 

Please share this opportunity will ALL interested colleagues and networks.

Important Information for participating in this Webinar.Seriously, read the following and save it for reference: 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial +1 (213) 929-4231 for audio. The access code is: 240-647-211. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to:http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 106-768-091

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to our Listserv at: 

https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/noaaclimatestewards/

        

 

Learn about integrating climate change education into your classroom or informal education programming, get an introduction to regionally relevant climate science, and hear about how other educators have used these materials. The webinar will be presented by educators who have used the resources in their own teaching, both in the classroom and in place-based education.

Certificates of attendance for professional development contact hours can be requested after the webinar; instructions will be provided during the session.

The presentation will cover:

  • Ohio Sea Grant’s updated Great Lakes Climate Change Curriculum
  • climate and Great Lakes literacy principles
  • informal resources to supplement and expand lesson plans

Experts from NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory, Dr. Stephanie Herring and Dr. Martin Hoerling, will join facilitators Dr. Anne Gold of CIRES and Deb Morrison of University Colorado Boulder.

Dr. Herring and Dr. Hoerling collaborated on the Explaining Extreme Events of 2012 From a Climate Perspective report, which resulted in their inclusion on Foreign Policy magazine's Top 100 Global Thinkers list.

In this interactive panel discussion, the scientists will discuss what characterizes an extreme weather event. They also will explore how scientists attribute single events or trends in extreme weather to climate change.

Join us for this month's webinar on Thursday, April 30th at 4pm EDT (1pm PDT)

Presented by: Scott Doney, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and Jim Foley, Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education
 
Space is limited
 
At 3400 m (11,155 ft) above the Pacific Ocean, on one of the most isolated mountains in the world, is an observatory that has been meticulously measuring our atmosphere for almost 60 years. Mauna Loa on the Island of Hawaii is more than 3700 km (2300 mi) away from the nearest major land mass, California, yet it is easily accessible. Mauna Loa was chosen by Dr. Charles David Keeling to make atmospheric carbon dioxide measurements because this location allowed access to air masses representative of the northern hemisphere. Since his measurements began in 1958, the concentration of atmospheric CO2 has been marching higher and higher at a rate that can only be attributed to the burning of fossil fuels.

Thirty years after Dr. Keeling began his time-series measurements that would come to be known as the Keeling Curve, another time-series began in Hawaii. This time the measurements were taken at a spot to represent the Pacific Ocean. Dubbed Station ALOHA, it is located 100 km (60 mi) north of Oahu where the depth is 4800 m (15758 ft). Since1988, the Hawaii Ocean Time-Series (HOT) program has been making near monthly four-day research cruises to Station ALOHA to measure how the ocean is changing over time. One of the many measurements taken with the HOT program is the amount of carbon dioxide dissolved in seawater. While there is much more variability in seawater, carbon dioxide in the ocean is increasing at the same rate as in the atmosphere. Unlike other atmospheric gasses like oxygen and nitrogen, carbon dioxide reacts with water to form a weak acid that is changing the chemistry of the ocean. While the carbon dioxide of the ocean has increased, the pH of the ocean has decreased, becoming more acidic.

An acidifying ocean will have substantial impacts on the marine life that depends on stable ocean chemistry for survival. Organisms such as corals, oysters, and snails that build body structures out of calcium carbonate will have a particularly tough time with ocean acidification.  Ocean acidification has already had economic impacts for several communities, and even greater impacts may be felt in the future. During this webinar, we will present some of the dangers posed by ocean acidification as well as demonstrations that can be done to discuss the impacts and chemistry of ocean acidification.

Following the presentation there will be a few short informational announcements relevant to the ocean acidification communication community. Please forward this invitation to interested colleagues. We look forward to seeing you at this event!

 

More info on the series and upcoming webinars can be found here

 

The Fine Print: Important Notes for participating in the Webinar 

1.Plan to log into the Webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar is continually upgrading their software. We want to be sure that your computer has time to access any upgrades and you are able to access the presentation and meeting.                   

2. When using the VOIP option for this Webinar, you must use a headset or ear bud-speakers. This will keep your output audio from re-entering your microphone, causing distortion

3. If you have difficulty logging in to the Webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 101-989-683

​Please join the NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project on Tuesday, November 3rd at 7:30 pmEastern Time

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project is Pleased to welcome Ms. Tarlise "Tarlie" Townsend from the University of Michigan Ford School of Public Policy as the featured speaker for our November webinar. 

Does uncertainty about the impacts of climate change suggests that scientists aren’t sure climate change is even happening? Or, perhaps, that we should wait to take mitigation or resilience actions until further research reduces that uncertainty? These are a few of the questions students might raise about the uncertainty in climate change predictions. Ms. Townsend will address them in part one of her presentation, discussing the sources of uncertainty in climate projections, what uncertainty means for scientific consensus, and how it can actually be harnessed to make better mitigation and resilience decisions. 

One takeaway will be that effective use of uncertainty information requires close attention to what’s communicated by the media, scientists, and interest groups. In the second part of her presentation, Ms. Townsend will point out common strategies for framing risk and uncertainty information, highlighting ways that students can be smart information consumers to avoid being misled. 

 

Please share this opportunity will ALL interested colleagues and networks.

Important Information for participating in this Webinar.Seriously, read the following and save it for reference: 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial +1 (646) 307-1719 for audio. The access code is: 336-623-352. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 111-626-755

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to our Web page

 

This course explores the science of climate change. Students will learn how the climate system works; what factors cause climate to change across different time scales and how those factors interact; how climate has changed in the past; how scientists use models, observations and theory to make predictions about future climate; and the possible consequences of climate change for our planet. The course explores evidence for changes in ocean temperature, sea level and acidity due to global warming. Students will learn how climate change today is different from past climate cycles and how satellites and other technologies are revealing the global signals of a changing climate. Finally, the course looks at the connection between human activity and the current warming trend and considers some of the potential social, economic and environmental consequences of climate change.

Dr. Kathleen Tierney, Director of the CU Boulder’s Natural Hazards Center and Dr. Kevin Trenberth from the Climate Analysis Section at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) will join facilitators Dr. Anne Gold of CIRES and Deb Morrison of University Colorado Boulder in an interactive panel discussion. 

These experts will discuss how scientists can forecast where extreme events will occur and their severity. They will cover what communities and governments  can do to increase resiliency to extreme weather events and how the scientific community can help prepare citizens and government. 

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