September 3, 2015 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM EDT

As part of the climate change goal, DOE is planning to host eight Regional Climate Change Impact Webinars as part of the MIE initiative. We are looking to host speakers who will discuss regional efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change impacts as they relate to the President's Climate Action Plan with a particular focus on engaging minority communities. 

Experts will provide findings from the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER), energy job strategies, and the National Climate Impact Assessment. As part of the QER discussion, we plan to share climate-based findings related to national security, resilience, the grid of the future, environment, grid siting, and shared transport. This discussion will outline federal energy policy objectives, proposals, and actions, particularly as they relate to climate change and resilience for underserved communities. For more information on the QER, please visit http://energy.gov/epsa/quadrennial-energy-review-qer. 

An expert on energy and climate change job strategies will discuss job opportunities by region as well as regional options for renewables and energy efficiency. We will share region-specific information about the energy workforce across a variety of energy sectors and experience levels. 

The final section of the webinar will focus on findings from the National Climate Assessment and their regional applicability to those communities who are disproportionally impacted by the effects of climate change. We hope to host regional experts who can share Assessment findings and provide potential tools for resilience among minority and tribal communities.

Webinar 1: Tuesday, October 7 - 6:30 pm EST / 3:30 PST/ 12:30 HST (90 min)

Join us for the first of two webinars for an introduction to our newest NOAA Data in the Classroom curriculum module – Investigating Coral Bleaching Using Real Data. You'll hear from NOAA experts about coral bleaching and how scientists use remote sensing tools to study stresses on coral health. The NODE curriculum developers will introduce the new lesson plans and demonstrate how our unique scaffolding can help students develop skills to access and use online data.

The NOAA Data in the Classroom Project develops curriculum designed to help teachers and students use real scientific data to explore dynamic Earth processes and understand the impact of environmental events on a regional or global scale. Each curriculum module features easy-to-use curriculum materials and specially designed websites that enable students to access and use real data. Our newest curriculum module – Investigating Coral Bleaching Using Real Data – is being developed for grades 6-8.

  • Introduction to the NODE Project
  • Coral Bleaching 101 with NOAA Experts
  • Coral Reef Watch: Studying Corals from Space
  • Overview of the entire curriculum module

Join Second Nature and the Security & Sustainability Forum for a webinar on the role of higher education in creating a sustained national climate assessment.  The National Climate Assessment Development and Advisory Committee (NCADAC) delivered a Special Report on Preparing the Nation for Change: Building a Sustained National Climate  Assessment Process to the FederalGovernment this year.  The report provides Federal managers  with advice and recommendations toward the development of an ongoing, sustained national assessment of global change impacts and adaptation and mitigation strategies for the nation.  A panel of primary authors of this report will summarize the report's findings and recommendations. 

Panelists: 

  • Moderator: James Buizer 
  • Overview of the Sustained National Climate Assessment: Sharon Hays 
  • Collaborative partnerships that sustain assessment activities: Amy Luers 
  • The scientific foundations of a Sustained Assessment toward managing the risks and opportunities of climate change: Richard Moss 
  • The role of higher education in a Sustained National Climate Assessment: Anne Waple

Monday, April 7, 2014 at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

Frank Niepold, NOAA Climate Program Office's Education coordinator, will discuss developing student’s 21st century skills by incorporating digitally available activities, videos, and visualizations into the classroom. The rigorously reviewed digital educational resources developed by the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) and syndicated through NOAA’s Climate.gov web site will be examined. A focal point will be how to teach a climate and energy learning progression across elementary through high school grades taking into account contact time and coherence matter constraints.

Please join us on Tuesday, September 1st at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project is pleased to present Lyndsey Manzo and Barbara Ikalainen for our September, 2015 webinar. Lyndsey and Barbara will discuss how they developed walking tours integrating innovative signage and mobile handheld technologies to teach students, educators and members of the public more about their local environments and the impacts of climate change. 

Lyndsey will present "The Climate Walk" - part of the Ohio State University’s Stone Laboratory student field trip program on Gibraltar Island in the western basin of Lake Erie – which consists of eight strategically placed stations that align with the Essential Principles of Climate Literacy and are accompanied by hands-on approaches to learning about climate change. This interactive place-based journey allows students to explore the impacts of climate change on their local environment, and provides educators with the ability to provide "on the fly" customized content in engaging formats. The Climate Walk is a model that can be replicated and used by formal and informal science educators in regions across the US. 

Barbara will present the process and outcomes of her NOAA Climate Stewards Grant "The North Shore Climate Awareness Project - Why Trees Matter". Barbara created an interactive walking tour of the 10 most interesting tree species on her college campus, posting signs and QR codes on trees allowing students, faculty and the public to instantly access detailed descriptions of that tree species, their carbon sequestration capabilities, and how they will be impacted by climate change in that region.
 

Please share this opportunity will ALL interested colleagues and networks.

 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar. Seriously, read the following and save it for reference: 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial +1 (562) 247-8321 for audio. The access code is: 597-874-782. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 120-411-787

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

 

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to our Listserv at: 

https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/noaaclimatestewards/

Webinar 2: Tuesday, October 21 – 6:30 pm EST / 3:30 PST/ 12:30 HST (90 min)

Join us for the second of two webinars for an introduction to our newest NOAA Data in the Classroom curriculum module – Investigating Coral Bleaching Using Real Data. You'll hear from NOAA experts about coral bleaching and how scientists use remote sensing tools to study stresses on coral health. The NODE curriculum developers will introduce the new lesson plans and demonstrate how our unique scaffolding can help students develop skills to access and use online data.

The NOAA Data in the Classroom Project develops curriculum designed to help teachers and students use real scientific data to explore dynamic Earth processes and understand the impact of environmental events on a regional or global scale. Each curriculum module features easy-to-use curriculum materials and specially designed websites that enable students to access and use real data. Our newest curriculum module – Investigating Coral Bleaching Using Real Data – is being developed for grades 6-8.

  • Guided walk-thru of curriculum lesson plans
  • Building students' capabilities using real data
  • Using NGSS, Disciplinary Core Ideas, and Cross Cutting Concepts
  • Climate Literacy and Coral Bleaching

The second in the four-part webinar series takes place on November 13 at 4.30 MT, 5.30 CT, 6.30 ET and 3.30 PT . The webinar will involve three hydrologists from the US Geological Survey:  Dr. Jeff Writer,Dr. Brian Ebel and Sheila Murphy.

Jeff specializes in wildfire impacts on water quality and aquatic ecosystems, coupling of ecological and engineered infrastructure, fate and transport of emerging contaminants. Brian specializes in unsaturated flow and soil physics, surface water/groundwater interaction, hillslope hydrology and runoff generation, landslide and debris flow initiation, and post-wildfire hydrology. Sheila’s research focuses on the characterization of the hydrology and water chemistry of small watersheds and how they are affected by both natural factors and disturbance.

The webinar will be streaming video from the CU Boulder campus, and will take questions from the live chat. 

April 17, 2014, at 4 p.m. EDT

From proxy data to direct observations, all signs point to the same conclusion: Earth's climate system is warming at an unprecedented rate. Join presenter Margaret Mooney from the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies to learn more about how scientists measure and document warming trends along with tools to teach this topic to your students.

Certificates of professional development hours are available upon request. Additional session dates will be announced soon.

"Ask NICE" Online Professional Development Series

Join the NASA Innovations in Climate Education, or NICE, team for the final webinar of the 2013-14 school year in their series of Google Plus Hangout professional development sessions. Extended workshops will be held over the summer with those who have participated in the series. A new series of online Ask NICE sessions will begin in the fall.

For more information, visit https://nice.larc.nasa.gov/asknice/ or http://dln.nasa.gov. Questions about this series should be sent to Bonnie Murray at bonnie.murray@nasa.gov.

Teams gather to rapidly prototype game designs (online, pervasive, tabletop, or other formats) and to inject new ideas to help grow the game industry and make educational climate information accessible to a range of audiences.  This is a unique opportunity for students, educators, scientists, game designers and interested public members to work together on the development of climate game prototypes that span a range of platforms, topics, and audiences.

Interested in hosting a local site?   Sign up your site at tinyurl.com/climategamejam

Recognition!  Each site will select a People’s Choice at the end of that site’s jam.  Teams can submit a 2-minute video via Dropbox for consideration and selection for National recognition including:

  • Selection for additional game development support from GlassLabs
  • Selection for inclusion in the Smithsonian Learning Lab – Excellent K-12 “classroom ready” entries that feature sound scientific concepts have the opportunity to be included on the Smithsonian’s new Learning Lab. As part of the Learning Lab, these games will be available to educators across the nation.
  • Selection for inclusion in the National Museum of Natural History’s showcase – Select finalists will be offered the opportunity to be showcased in an arcade on the grounds of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. The showcase will take place in November.

Upcoming Pre-Jam Events:

Remake Learning Hang-out: Games in the Classroom, September 22, 2 pm EST

Extreme Event: River City Game Night, September 30, 6:30-8:30 pm EST, Koshland Science Museum, Washington, D.C. 

NOS’s Communications and Education Division is providing organizational leadership for this event and is working closely with NOAA’s Climate Program Office and other NOAA offices for subject matter expertise. Partners include Smithsonian Institution; Koshland Science Center; GlassLab; Entertainment Software Association; Wilson Center; California Academy of Science; STEMHero; Polar Learning and Responding (PoLAR) Climate Change Education Partnership; University of Oklahoma; Paleontological Research Institute (Cornell); Harmony High School (FL); Barnard College; Michigan Technological University; BrainPOP; and Zulama.

Interested in more information?

Contact Peg.Steffen@noaa.gov 

Why games?

Games are increasingly used in educational and other settings to help inspire curiosity, creativity, collaboration, optimism, and problem-solving skills.  They provide a powerful opportunity for enhancing climate literacy. Serious games address real-world challenges, compress big problems into immediate experiences, encourage systems thinking, and promote active engagement, making them particularly well suited to climate change education.  The field of games focused on climate change is growing, yet there remain gaps in the type of content covered.  

In December 2014, the White House Office of Science & Technology Policy launched the Climate Education and Literacy Initiative with the goal of connecting American students with best-availablescientificinformation about climate change. As a commitment in support of this effort, Federal and non-governmental experts are collaborating to harness the promise of educational games and interactive media to enhance understanding and awareness of climate change impacts and solutions.

This course explores the science of climate change. Students will learn how the climate system works; what factors cause climate to change across different time scales and how those factors interact; how climate has changed in the past; how scientists use models, observations and theory to make predictions about future climate; and the possible consequences of climate change for our planet. The course explores evidence for changes in ocean temperature, sea level and acidity due to global warming. Students will learn how climate change today is different from past climate cycles and how satellites and other technologies are revealing the global signals of a changing climate. Finally, the course looks at the connection between human activity and the current warming trend and considers some of the potential social, economic and environmental consequences of climate change.

 

Authoring Scientists

Ed Mathez, Geologist

Gavin Schmidt, Climatologist
 
Drew Shindell, Climatologist

 

Key Science Concepts

The Sun is the primary source of energy for Earth's climate system. The Earth's energy is in balance, or equilibrium, when Earth emits the same amount of energy as it absorbs.

The climate system is dynamic and has many interrelated components. A change in any one component can influence the equilibrium of the system and result in climate changes.

Climate varies over space and time through both natural and human sources. These forces operate over time periods ranging from years to hundreds of millions or even billions of years and vary widely with location on Earth.

Human activities – particularly the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide since the Industrial Revolution – are affecting the climate system today, leading to warming temperatures globally.

Evidence for variations in past climates is held in ocean and lake sediments, ice cores, corals, tree rings, and other geologic records. Understanding past climate informs us about how the present climate system works and how it might change in the future.

Climate change will have consequences for the Earth system including human society. Climate change research involves extensive observations, theory and modeling. Future climate change scenarios are essential to informing efforts to mitigate and to adapt to the consequences of climate change.

Graduate Credit

This course is approved for graduate credit and continuing education units from leading institutions at an additional cost.

 

 

Pages