Education and communication are among the most powerful tools the nation has to bring hidden hazards to public attention, understanding, and action.

Informing an Effective Response to Climate Change, NRC (2010)

Bumble bees, extreme weather events, sea ice loss, and drought. The impacts of climate change are being felt by communities and creatures across our nation—and world. The Forum on Digital Media for STEM Learning: Climate Education will explore how the stories and science behind these impacts are increasingly being integrated into classroom instruction and STEM education contexts, with a focus on digital media. Held at WGBH’s Brighton studio on Monday, November 9, 2015, this highly-interactive and fast-paced event will examine emerging narratives in climate education, digital media tools and products that show unique potential for educational settings, and promising modes of engagement for students, teachers and schools.

 

Please explore the program and line-up of presenters. Click here to find out how to watch the Forum live.

LIVE STREAM timing for each strand:
 
9:15  - 11 AM ET Strand 1: Standards and Storylines 
 
11:30 AM – 1:15 PM ET Strand 2: Emerging Platforms and Products 
 
2 – 3 PM ET Strand 3: New Modes of Engagement
 

A note about the Program Design of the Forum event:

This Forum event is designed for both live, in-person audiences, as well as viewers who wish to watch and interact via online streaming and social media. The three topic strands have been developed around the content, technology and pedagogy of Climate Education, and reference the TPCK model for professional learning. Strands provide a blend of theory and practice, with anchoring keynote presentations that are followed by shorter “case study” presentations that offer early findings and emergent research. Each strand concludes with a hosted panel discussion with in-studio and online audiences.

These strands are followed by an attendee-driven “unconference,” where participants discuss and develop ways to implement some of the ideas from the panels that had resonated with them. Attendees of the 2014 Forum event reported that the “unconference” session, and additional networking opportunities, provide a real “value-add” for in-person attendance. A dedicated online community space containing tools and resources will continue to be accessible along with the work products from the Forum events, laying the foundation for a larger community of practice for sharing best practices and lessons learned.

The 2015 first annual Earth Educators' Rendezvous will bring together researchers and practitioners working in all aspects of undergraduate Earth education. We welcome faculty from all disciplines who are interested in improving their teaching about the Earth, administrators from geoscience departments and interdisciplinary programs that want to become stronger, and education researchers of all types. Join the Rendezvous for 2 or 3 days or stay the whole week.

Program

The Earth Rendezvous program will bring together these themes into a rich tapestry of workshops, contributed talks and posters, plenary sessions, and working groups. Drawing across the work currently taking place in geoscience, environmental, and sustainability education, meeting attendees will have the opportunity to learn broadly, focus on a particular issue or challenge, or something in between. All are invited to submit abstracts to the contributed program of posters and short presentations.

Registration and Abstract Submission

Abstract Deadline: March 1, 2015
Early Registration Deadline: April 13, 2015

 

Part of the InTeGrate and Cutting Edge

Programs for Improved Undergraduate Education On the Cutting Edge is managed by NAGT

Program Sponsors: National Science Foundation, The National Association of Geoscience Teachers, The Geological Society of America, The American Geophysical Union

ClimateChangeLIVE distance learning adventure, brings you a wealth of climate change education resources and programs from 17 Federal agencies and non-profit organizations! We offer educators, a source of trusted, science-based materials, which are correlated to science education standards. This webinar highlights climate change education resources from three of our partners. Project Learning Tree and the U.S. Forest Service will introduce their GreenSchools! program and how you can foster student-led efforts to move your school toward sustainability. The Forest Service will highlight the Natural Inquirer science education journal’s Climate Collection which takes real-life Forest Service research, and engages students in the science inquiry method, along with activities tied to the research.

Presenters: Project Learning Tree, U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Monday, May 5, 2014 at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

The main presentation this month will be given by Jerry Meehl, a senior scientist in the University Center for Atmospheric Research's (UCAR) Climate and Global Dynamics Division. Jerry  will talk about the processes involved in producing the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report as well as the National Climate Assessment (NCA).
  
A second presentation will be given by Mindy Berbeco, the Programs and Policy Director at the National Center for Science Education will further discuss the NCA, NCAnet - A group of organizations working with the National Climate Assessment to engage producers and users of climate science and impacts information across the United States, and their efforts to involve educators in unpacking the teachable moments from the report, and how you can become involved and have an impact on a nation-wide scale.

Monday, December 7th at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

This webinar takes a deep dive into the use of simple models in climate education. Dr. Russell will explore some fundamental concepts of climate science that allow students to use simple models to actively investigate the scientific concepts. He'll start with a basic calculation of the "theoretical" global average temperature of our home planet - first walking through the science and math behind the calculations, then using a simple computer-based model that allows students to explore multiple "what if" scenarios. Next, he'll look at the Greenhouse Effect's impact on global temperatures and present a physical model that illustrates the Greenhouse Effect and the layered structure of Earth's atmosphere. After that, Dr. Russell will present how some straightforward math connects anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions with future global temperatures - and then explore another computer-based simulation that allows students to test the impact of various emission scenarios on future global temperatures. 

Finally, Dr. Russell will take a look at an extensive online list of simulations, games, and virtual labs for climate education. Time permitting, he'll show some Greenhouse Effect simulations and a paleoclimate (tree rings) simulation. 

 

Please share this opportunity will ALL interested colleagues and networks.

Important Information for participating in this Webinar. Seriously, read this and save it for your reference: 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial +1 (415) 930-5321 for audio. The access code is: 551-581-773. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
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For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to their Web page

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to their Listserv

 

May (6, 13, 20, 27) and June (17, 24), 2015
Virtual Workshop

 

One of the best ways for students to understand the critical Earth issues facing humanity is through the analysis and interpretation of actual data. Fortunately, there are now many organizations that not only monitor many geophysical and geochemical properties of the earth but provide the data in user-friendly ways. Whether it is through maps, images, animations, or raw data, these data can be mined and interpreted by undergraduates in ways that allow them to develop an understanding of both the relevant critical Earth issues and of issues related to the reliability, errors, and significance associated with scientific conclusions and assertions.

This workshop aims to help instructors of undergraduate classes develop classroom activities, demonstrations, and research opportunities on topics of current societal relevance and interest using new online resources of geoscience data. These activities will be added to the extensive Cutting Edge online teaching activities collection.

REGISTRATION DEADLINE: March 1, 2015

This workshop is part of the On the Cutting Edge professional development program for current and future geoscience faculty, and is sponsored by the National Association of Geoscience Teachers with funding provided by NAGT, and a grant from the National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education and other contributing sponsors.

 

Image Credit: The carbon dioxide visualization was produced by a computer model called GEOS-5, created by scientists at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Global Modeling and Assimilation Office. 

Preparing for or responding to an environmental disasters requires knowledge from many disciplines and real time interdisciplinary problem solving. The interaction between the extreme event, people in its path and the response mechanisms of government and business combine at one place and time. How do we prepare students for careers where they can make useful and valuable contributions that mitigate risks and increase resilience in the face of a growing population and changing environment? What do students need to know about risk and resilience? What foundational knowledge will prepare them to communicate with, learn from, and work with experts from the range of disciplines that are needed to address these problems?

This workshop will bring together educators from the variety of disciplines that prepare students to address natural disasters with those currently engaged in addressing these challenges. Focusing on three case studies, we will share best practices in education to help students to understand needs of different stakeholders and to prepare students for careers related to hazard mitigation and adaptation. We will consider how partnerships among academia, civil society, and the business community will enhance both student learning and community preparedness. We will identify needs for curricular resources and discuss how to meet these needs.

This workshop is open to 30 faculty (by application) and there is no registration fee to attend. Participation for non-academics is by invitation. Workshop stipends are available to help defray travel expenses in cases of financial need. Accepted participants are expected to contribute teaching materials to a new web-based collection devoted to teaching about risk and resilience across the disciplines.

May 29th, 2014 12:00 to 1:00 PM ET

Climate change in the Great Lakes region and beyond is expected to promote shifts in the ranges and phenology of well-known plant and animal species. These shifts are often a result of changes in the availability of food and shelter, as well as temperature. Knowing more about these potential impacts will help wildlife managers and nature enthusiasts alike to adapt to and potentially mitigate some of the resulting changes in wildlife diversity.

This webinar will cover:

  • an overview of potential climate change impacts on wildlife
  • effects of a changing climate on the phenology of migratory birds
  • impacts of shifting climate conditions (such as drought and flooding) on the vulnerability of species of special concern
  • climate change effects on Broad-tailed Hummingbirds as a result of shifts in the timing of flowering of their nectar flowers glacier lily, dwarf larkspur, and Indian paintbrush, which they rely on during spring migration

The webinar is free. To register click here. Once registered, you will receive a confirmation email with log-in information.

 

Agenda

Welcome and Introduction: Jill Jentes Banicki, Ohio Sea Grant

Assessing the Vulnerability of Wildlife to Climate Change: Benjamin Zuckerberg, Dept of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, UW-Madison

Climate Change Effects on Broad-tailed Hummingbirds: Amy Iler, Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Maryland and The Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory

Question/Answer and Wrap Up

Discussion: Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions via a live chat after the presentation.

 

Visit changingclimate.osu.edu to view previous webinars and other climate resources.

Monday, February 1st at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

Getting Real: Health in the Teaching of Climate and Earth Science
 

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project welcomes Dr. John M. Balbus, M.D., M.P.H., Senior Advisor for Public Health to the Director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences as our featured speaker this month.

Presentation Abstract: 

The impacts on health of climate change as well as the societal responses to climate change are varied and significant. In the past five years, recognition of the importance of the health implications of climate change has grown enormously, from major reports in the premier international medical journal Lancet to messaging from the President about the US Clean Power Plant rule and Climate Action Plan. Understanding how climate change and climate variability affect people’s health and well being is a foundational aspect of basic climate literacy. For teachers, integrating content and exercises on health provides an opportunity to engage students in earth science with projects that both demonstrate the relevance of the science and also require development of critical analytic and synthetic skills. Health content related to climate change can also augment curricula in the social sciences, history, literature, and the visual arts. This talk will summarize the health implications of climate change and encourage discussion of how health content can help teachers achieve their educational goals. 
 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial 1-(914)-614-3221 for audio. The access code is: 367-785-127. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 145-578-259

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to our Web page

 

The Climate Leader is an online training in systems thinking to help fuel the global response to climate change. These materials will help you to be more effective at addressing climate change by enabling you to see the interconnections and big picture in your work.

Climate Interactive launched The Climate Leader, a free five-week online training series in systems thinking designed for people working to address climate change. Sign up now at: http://climateinteractive.org/the-climate-leader/

This online course will share some time-tested insights into navigating the complex world of taking action on climate. Included will be video lessons offering some practical and proven approaches for leading in complexity, being strategic, and drawing on both your own rational brilliance and your own deep intuitive instincts through systems thinking.
 
Join more than 2,000 other Climate Leaders for this training: http://climateinteractive.org/the-climate-leader/
 
When you sign up, you will begin receiving the series of lessons via email. There will also be opportunities to participate in exercises to deepen your understanding and connect with others participating in the course.
 
Behind the Climate Leader are decades of experience from the team at Climate Interactive and powerful ideas developed at MIT. Their cutting edge tools have been helping people see what works to respond to climate change. They’ve helped students, business leaders, activists, and UN negotiators determine the choices that will put us on a pathway to a healthy climate. Lessons will be led by Dr. Elizabeth Sawin and Drew Jones, co-directors of Climate Interactive, who will share their wealth of insights on systems thinking with you.
 
The Climate Leader goal is to help you be as intentional as possible, as bold as possible, and as visionary and clear as you can be. Through the eleven lessons, this course will help you answer questions like:
  • How can I best look at the big picture, and why is that so useful?
  • How do I identify places that will have the most impact?
  • How can my efforts best be amplified?
  • What are the root causes of the challenge I’m facing?

 

The course is free and you can sign up to begin at anytime. In return for what Climate Leader provides, they invite you to use what you can to make a difference, share what you like, and give us feedback.

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