Speaker: Minda Berbeco, PhD, Programs and Policy Director, National Center for Science Education
Resources: Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN),PINEMAP, WSF Curriculum

How can educators teach children about local impacts of climate change? Where can they find good resources for activities and up-to-date scientific information from reputable sources? Minda Berbeco is the Programs and Policy Director at the National Center for Science Education. She will be talking about the newly released National Climate Assessment, a scientific and governmental resource that demonstrates the local impacts on climate change and projections for the future. She will present on how to bring the NCA into the classroom and what vetted resources are available. We will focus on resources to make climate change local and relevant.

Join us for this month's webinar on Wednesday, February 25th at 6pm EST (3pm PST, 1pm HST)

Ocean Acidification: A Virtual Lab and Tangible Solutions for High School Students

Presented by: Jason Hodin, Research Associate at Hopkins Marine Station and Staff Scientist and Media Designer for the Inquiry to Student Environmental Action (I2SEA) Team 

The VirtualUrchin and Inquiry-to-Insight (I2I) teams at Stanford University and the University of Gothenburg (Sweden) have developed "Our Acidifying Ocean", an interactive tutorial and virtual lab examining the impact of ocean acidification (OA) on the planktonic larva of the sea urchin.  After coming to appreciate the problems and challenges posed by OA, students are then encouraged to participate in the International Student Carbon Footprint Challenge (ISCFC), where secondary/high school students worldwide calculate their location-calibrated individual footprints, and share what they learned and envision solutions on the project's micro-blogging platform. Our Acidifying Ocean and an expanded ISCFC will form part of the core of a newly funded project by the same team just getting underway called I2SEA: Inquiry to Student Environmental Action.  I2SEA staff scientist and media designer Dr. Jason Hodin will lead an overview and walkthrough of these freely-available activities as well as the plans for the new project, with specific discussion of how to involve your students.
The Sharing Ocean Acidification Resources for Communicators and Educators webinar series is jointly sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries and Ocean Acidification Program.
Space is limited.

Reserve your Webinar seat now at:

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

Following the presentation there will be a few short informational announcements relevant to the ocean acidification communication community. Please forward this invitation to interested colleagues. We look forward to seeing you at this event!

More info on the series and upcoming webinars can be found here


The GLOBE Surface Temperature Train-the-Trainer workshop will be held on Friday, April 12, 2013 at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA. Trainers, Partners, and Teachers certified in Surf Temp are invited to attend a FREE Surface Temperature training by Master Trainer & Lead Scientist for this protocol, Dr. Kevin Czajkowski.

March 12, 2014
Time: LIVE from 1 - 2 p.m. Eastern Time
Archive available after March 12

This program will feature:

  • LIVE interactive conversation about climate change with experts
  • Send us your tweets, post on Facebook, or send an e-mail to climate change experts

For links and resources mentioned in the webcast are posted on the ClimateChangeLive page.

Join us on Monday, March 2nd at 7:30 PM Eastern Time for: Western Water Resources, Climate, and Science

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar


Mark Twain famously noted that “whiskey is for drinking; water is for fighting over.” This is particularly true in the semi-arid western United States where the balance between water supply and water demand is nearly equal. Stress on the system is exacerbated by both human demands on the system but also climatevariability and change. Kevin Werner, NOAA’s Western Region Climate Services Director will describe the water resources environment in the Western United States including the impact of climate change. He will also describe his own experience working with decision makers in the water resources sector to utilize forecasts and science from NOAA to improve their operations. 

Following the webinar, there will be an informal discussion of the topics presented. All attendees are invited to participate. There are limited spaces for this discussion, information on joining will be provided during the event.

Please share this opportunity will all interested colleagues and Networks. 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar. Seriously, read the following and save it for reference:

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting at the start time.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting using VOIP, dial 1 (415) 655-0059 for audio. The access code is: 114-447-768. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 158-091-955

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

Vicki Arthur will lead participants through a wide range of education resources from the U.S. Forest Service for teaching about climate change. Forest Service researchers have been observing and studying the effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems for over 30 years. Learn how your students can collect and enter tree data to quantify and put a dollar value on the services that your school yard trees provide.  Discover an interactive atlas where students can learn about computer modeling while observing the potential effects of different emissions scenarios on the ranges of birds and trees. 


This program featured:

  • Presentation by the award-winning Alliance for Climate Education (ACE)
  • Student moderators and panel discussions
  • Videos of student-led projects from across the country
  • Student perspectives that will lead to the conversation in the second webcast

A recording is available.

Date: Wednesday, April 29, 2015
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

In July, 2012, the world witnessed a shocking event when widespread melting occurred over the surface of 97% of the Greenland Ice Sheet. According to ice core records, the last time such widespread melting occurred was in 1889. What caused such widespread melt? Was it just the warm temperatures, or is it a more complicated situation? Register today!

Dr. Mary Albert and her Dartmouth graduate students happened to be on the Greenland Ice Sheet at just the right time to gather some evidence. They excavated samples of the refrozen surface melt layer to take back to the U.S. for study, where their team investigated the physical, chemical, and isotopic aspects of that layer. They also looked deeper into the ice sheet and investigated evidence from firn (old snow) cores that contained melt layers dating back to 1889. They discovered that both in 2012 and in 1889, the warming and soot that changed the snow albedo (reflectivity) had both been necessary to synergistically create the melt; neither factor alone could have achieved melt in the cold, high, dry snow regions on the ice sheet.

Alden Adolph is now working with Mary on a project in New Hampshire to investigate climate change, snow albedo, and land use change on a project that is much closer to home. In Greenland, the soot from forest fires travels long distances to end up on the snow, where it changes the albedo. In New Hampshire, soot and aerosols can come from similar distant sources, but also from very local sources like wood stoves down the street. Alden will show how engineers and scientists use evidence to examine the importance of snow albedo even here in New England. Alden will also share ways in which she inspires younger students in the field, so that they can share in the excitement of research. Please join us for this relevant webinar, to learn how scientists used evidence from multiple sources to learn what caused the recent big melt, and why understanding your regional albedo is important to your future.


Title: Fire and Ice: Snow Albedo and Our Future
Target audience: K–12 educators
Date: Wednesday, April 29, 2015
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenter: Dr. Mary AlbertAlden AdolphLinda Morris


Register today to participate in this web seminar. Upon registering you will receive an e-mail confirmation including information about the program and suggested links to visit in preparation of the event. Additional information about the web seminar will be e-mailed to you days before the program.

Each web seminar is a unique, stand-alone, program. Archives of the web seminars and the presenters’ PowerPoint presentations will be available through the links on this web page. Learn more about the features of the web seminar and read answers to frequently asked questions from participants.


This e-workshop developed by the FrameWorks Institute in partnership with the New England Aquarium gives an introductory look at how interpreters can utilize Strategic Framing to more effectively communicate the ocean and climate change story with the public. If you are interested in learning more about how to use Strategic Framing at your institution consider applying to a NNOCCI Study Circle. See the New England Aquarium's partner page for more information.

This workshop functions best in a modern Web browser that supports HTML5. We recommend Google ChromeFireFoxSafari, or IE9.

This month's webinar will build on the theme of Earth's Energy Budget with an investigation into clouds and their role in Earth's climate system. Participants will learn about resources from the Students' Cloud Observations On-Line, or S'COOL, program that allows students to practice cloud identification and submit observations to NASA as citizen scientists. Participants will also take a closer look at posters and interactive features created using data from the CERES instrument that is aboard a variety of NASA satellites.

Certificates of professional development hours are available upon request. Additional session dates will be announced soon.