11:00 am Pacific | 12:00 pm Mountain | 1:00 pm Central | 2:00 pm Eastern

Presenters: Diane Doser (The University of Texas at El Paso), Joshua Villalobos (El Paso Community College), Stefany Sit (University of Illinois at Chicago), Sue Ebanks (Savannah State University)

This webinar is part of a series supporting teaching with InTeGrate principles, using InTeGrate-developed and curated materials as tools.

Summary

This webinar will provide an opportunity to hear from faculty who are working with diverse students to broaden the distribution of geoscience and environmental science knowledge and awareness at the undergraduate level. Diane Doser and Joshua Villalobos are leaders of the El Paso Higher Education Community InTeGrate Implementation Program, and will discuss the role of building local relevance using societal issues and the effectiveness of using diverse pedagogical approaches in teaching to a minority group. Sue Ebanks is the leader of the Savannah State University InTeGrate Implementation Program. Sue will discuss how to facilitate interaction between science and non-science students and how to increase awareness of locally relevant environmental issues among minority groups. Stefany Sit is the leader of the University of Illinois at Chicago InTeGrate Implementation Program. She will discuss how focusing on career paths can be used as an awareness, motivation, and recruitment tool when working with urban students. The webinar will include 40 minutes of presentations and 20 minutes for questions and discussion. Participants are encouraged to both ask questions of the presenters and discuss their own experiences on the topic. 

Goals:

At the end of this webinar, participants will have

  • motivation to recruit and support students who are underrepresented in geoscience and related fields
  • examples of strategies to engage students through societally relevant topics, concepts that cross disciplines, and connections to careers
  • greater familiarity with InTeGrate principles and resources
  • new colleagues engaged in this work

 

For more information on the series and to learn more about InTeGrate visit: http://serc.carleton.edu/integrate/workshops/index.html

Vicki Arthur will lead participants through a wide range of education resources from the U.S. Forest Service for teaching about climate change. Forest Service researchers have been observing and studying the effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems for over 30 years. Learn how your students can collect and enter tree data to quantify and put a dollar value on the services that your school yard trees provide.  Discover an interactive atlas where students can learn about computer modeling while observing the potential effects of different emissions scenarios on the ranges of birds and trees. 

Join us on Monday, April 13th at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

There is increasing recognition of the significance of how Traditional Environmental Knowledge (TEK) can inform our understanding of the impacts of climate change and strategies for adaptation and mitigation. Indigenous people bring a collective knowledge of the land, sky and sea and provide a crucial foundation for community-based adaptation and mitigation. Indigenous knowledge has been long recognized as a key source of information and insight in domains such as forestry, traditional medicine, biodiversity conservation, resource management, impact assessment, and natural disaster preparedness and response. 
 
NOAA’s Climate Stewards Education Project is honored collaborate with Cultural Specialists from the Smithsonian Museum of the American Indian, Project Indigenous, and Educators from the University of Wisconsin-Extension to present this webinar on TEK, how it can inform our understanding of a changing climate's impacts on coastal and inland Indigenous people, and useful teaching materials to bring these ideas together. 
  • Dennis Zotigh, Kiowa, San Juan Pueblo and Santee Dakota, Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, will provide an opening song. 
  • Scott Frazier, Crow/Santee, Project Indigenous, will discuss climate change impacts on sacred sites/sacred places, and what TEK can offer in adapting to climate change impacts. 
  • Albert “Abby” Ybarra, Yaqui-Tohono O'Odham, Project Indigenous, will present Three Sisters Gardening, an ancient method of farming and how it can be used to connect youth to the earth, annual cycles of growth, and climate change. 
  • Cathy Techmann, University of Wisconsin-Extension, will present G-WOW “Gikinoo’wizhiwe Onji Waaban” (Guiding for Tomorrow), a climate service learning initiative integrating climate change research, TEK, and place-based evidence of climate change impacts on traditional Ojibwe lifeways to provide knowledge about what can be done to mitigate or adapt to a changing climate for people of all culture

Following the webinar, there will be an informal discussion of the topics presented. All attendees are invited to participate. There are limited spaces for this discussion, information on joining will be provided during the event.

Please share this opportunity will all interested colleagues and Networks.

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar

Important Information for participating in this Webinar. Seriously, read the following and save it for reference:

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting at the start time.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting using VOIP, dial +1 (415) 655-0059 for audio. The access code is: 926-695-389. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 126-553-435

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

 

In this hour-long webinar, a NASA scientist will share the current state of the 2015-2016 El Niño event, and will discuss whether this El Niño matched the predictions for how global weather patterns would be impacted. Participants will also learn how to use the GLOBE data visualization tools to compare and contrast the El Niño Student field campaign variables from schools around the world.

This e-workshop developed by the FrameWorks Institute in partnership with the New England Aquarium gives an introductory look at how interpreters can utilize Strategic Framing to more effectively communicate the ocean and climate change story with the public. If you are interested in learning more about how to use Strategic Framing at your institution consider applying to a NNOCCI Study Circle. See the New England Aquarium's partner page for more information.

This workshop functions best in a modern Web browser that supports HTML5. We recommend Google ChromeFireFoxSafari, or IE9.

On April 22, 2015 please join us for a live webinar showcasing The Wild Center’s Youth Climate Summit — designed by and for high school students. The Association of Science-Technology Centers (ASTC) and The Wild Center have teamed up to share a successful Youth Climate Summit format designed to engage high school students in climate literacy through meaningful dialogue and action planning on climate change. We will highlight this program through a two-hour webinar that will provide an overview of the Youth Climate Summit concept, impacts and outcomes for schools and students, and the planning resources available for free through our Youth Climate Summit Toolkit. Project Director Jen Kretser along with two summit students — Erin Weaver and Meadow Hackett — will be sharing their experiences.

Encouraged by US government leaders and interest by other science centers, our collective goal is to share this convening program format at no cost and support the development of at least 10 Youth Climate Summits across the international science museum community in 2015. We will offer all the organizational tools you will need along with connections to scientific experts in your region.

Climate literacy education continues to be an urgent issue and this program format allows for informal science institutions such as science centers, zoos, aquariums, and non-profits to join in the international effort. Youth Climate Summits have been found to be powerful vehicles for inspiration, learning, community engagement, and youth leadership development. Climate literacy with a focus on local climate impacts and solutions is a key component of the Youth Climate Summit. The project-based learning surrounding the creation of a unique, student driven, sustainability and Climate Action Plan promotes leadership skills applicable to and the tools necessary for a 21st Century workforce. This effort was highlighted as a commitment in support of theWhite House Office of Science & Technology Policy’s Climate Education and Literacy Initiative, with the goal of connecting American students and citizens with the best-available, science-based information about climate change. The meeting is being hosted by the Department of Energy office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy as part of their efforts to support Climate and Energy Literacy.

The Youth Climate Summit Toolkit can be accessed here.

This short video provides an overview of the Adirondack Youth Climate Summit.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE:

Wednesday, April 22
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET
Youth Climate Summit

Please join the webinar from your computer, tablet, or smartphone here:https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/327254349

You can also dial in using your phone:
   United States – +1 (872) 240-3312
   Access Code: 327-254-349

For anyone in the Washington DC area, we invite you to attend in person at the US Department of Energy. Please RSVP to:
Joshua Sneideman, Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow
Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
202-586-5695
joshua.sneideman@ee.doe.gov

8:00 pm EDT (12:00 am June 14th UTC) 

In this hour-long webinar, NASA scientists will share ideas for how the data that has been collected could be used to enable scientists to learn more about the El Niño phenomena. Three GLOBE teachers who have had students use GLOBE data to answer scientific investigations will share their best practices and experiences.

Explore the science of climate change, and how scientists study climate and make predictions using modeling. This NASA-funded course will take place over three weeks, both online and onsite at AMNH, and will be co-taught by Museum educators and climate scientists.

Funding is provided by NASA's Global Climate Change Education Program under Grant Number NNX10AB59A.

 Friday, April 17 at 1:00 PM EDT

In this webinar, a panel of Arctic experts will present the booklet and outline how climate changes currently underway in the Arctic are a driver for global sea-level rise, offer new prospects for natural resource extraction, and have rippling effects through the world’s weather, climate, food supply and economy. The webinar will feature a presentation and Q&A session with:

Julie Brigham-Grette, Professor of Quaternary/Glacial Geology at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, Chair of the National Research Council’s Polar Research Board, and Co-Chair of the authoring committee of Lessons and Legacies of International Polar Year 2007-2008.

Stephanie Pfirman, Professor of Environmental Sciences at Barnard College and Co-Chair of the authoring committee of The Arctic in the Anthropocene: Emerging Research Questions.

James White, Director of the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, Professor of Geological Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and Chair of the authoring committee of Abrupt Impacts of Climate Change: Anticipating Surprises.

 

Arctic Matters: The Global Connection to Changes in the Arctic

Download the Booklet PDF

Register for the webinar

Interactive website — coming soon!

This booklet is an educational resource from the National Research Council’s Polar Research Board that introduces the threats and opportunities of the Arctic’s rapidly changing environment and explains why the Arctic matters — to all of us.

Viewed in satellite images as a jagged white coat draped over the top of the globe, the high Arctic appears distant and isolated. But even if you don’t live there, don’t do business there, and will never travel there, you are closer to the Arctic than you think.

Arctic Matters: The Global Connection to Changes in the Arctic draws on a large collection of peer-reviewed National Research Council reports and other national and international reports to provide a brief, reader-friendly primer on the complex ways in which the changes currently affecting the Arctic and its diverse people, resources, and environment can, in turn, affect the entire globe.

 

September 3, 2015 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM EDT

As part of the climate change goal, DOE is planning to host eight Regional Climate Change Impact Webinars as part of the MIE initiative. We are looking to host speakers who will discuss regional efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change impacts as they relate to the President's Climate Action Plan with a particular focus on engaging minority communities. 

Experts will provide findings from the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER), energy job strategies, and the National Climate Impact Assessment. As part of the QER discussion, we plan to share climate-based findings related to national security, resilience, the grid of the future, environment, grid siting, and shared transport. This discussion will outline federal energy policy objectives, proposals, and actions, particularly as they relate to climate change and resilience for underserved communities. For more information on the QER, please visit http://energy.gov/epsa/quadrennial-energy-review-qer. 

An expert on energy and climate change job strategies will discuss job opportunities by region as well as regional options for renewables and energy efficiency. We will share region-specific information about the energy workforce across a variety of energy sectors and experience levels. 

The final section of the webinar will focus on findings from the National Climate Assessment and their regional applicability to those communities who are disproportionally impacted by the effects of climate change. We hope to host regional experts who can share Assessment findings and provide potential tools for resilience among minority and tribal communities.

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