Monday, June 6 at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

The Climate Stories Project (CSP) is an educational and artistic forum for sharing stories about personal and community responses to climate change. Through CSP workshops students learn how to engage with climate change through people’s stories, rather than just through the lens of science. In the workshops, students prepare, carry out, and record interviews with local and remote interviewees about their diverse responses to climate change. Students learn to speak with each other about climate change, develop interviewing and editing skills, and create and share original digital storytelling projects. In this presentation you'll learn about the background, goals, methods, and structure of CSP education workshops, and how to integrate them into your existing curriculum. To find out more about CSP, visit climatestoriesproject.org
 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar - Seriously, read the following and save it for your reference: 

  • Log into the webinar AT LEAST 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial 1-(562)-247-8422 for audio. The access code is: 295-545-703. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
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For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to our Web page 

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to our Listserv

Join us for this month's webinar on Wednesday, February 25th at 6pm EST (3pm PST, 1pm HST)

Ocean Acidification: A Virtual Lab and Tangible Solutions for High School Students

Presented by: Jason Hodin, Research Associate at Hopkins Marine Station and Staff Scientist and Media Designer for the Inquiry to Student Environmental Action (I2SEA) Team 

The VirtualUrchin and Inquiry-to-Insight (I2I) teams at Stanford University and the University of Gothenburg (Sweden) have developed "Our Acidifying Ocean", an interactive tutorial and virtual lab examining the impact of ocean acidification (OA) on the planktonic larva of the sea urchin.  After coming to appreciate the problems and challenges posed by OA, students are then encouraged to participate in the International Student Carbon Footprint Challenge (ISCFC), where secondary/high school students worldwide calculate their location-calibrated individual footprints, and share what they learned and envision solutions on the project's micro-blogging platform. Our Acidifying Ocean and an expanded ISCFC will form part of the core of a newly funded project by the same team just getting underway called I2SEA: Inquiry to Student Environmental Action.  I2SEA staff scientist and media designer Dr. Jason Hodin will lead an overview and walkthrough of these freely-available activities as well as the plans for the new project, with specific discussion of how to involve your students.
 
The Sharing Ocean Acidification Resources for Communicators and Educators webinar series is jointly sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries and Ocean Acidification Program.
 
Space is limited.

Reserve your Webinar seat now at:
 https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/290431963023220993

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

Following the presentation there will be a few short informational announcements relevant to the ocean acidification communication community. Please forward this invitation to interested colleagues. We look forward to seeing you at this event!

More info on the series and upcoming webinars can be found here

 

Teams gather to rapidly prototype game designs (online, pervasive, tabletop, or other formats) and to inject new ideas to help grow the game industry and make educational climate information accessible to a range of audiences.  This is a unique opportunity for students, educators, scientists, game designers and interested public members to work together on the development of climate game prototypes that span a range of platforms, topics, and audiences.

Interested in hosting a local site?   Sign up your site at tinyurl.com/climategamejam

Recognition!  Each site will select a People’s Choice at the end of that site’s jam.  Teams can submit a 2-minute video via Dropbox for consideration and selection for National recognition including:

  • Selection for additional game development support from GlassLabs
  • Selection for inclusion in the Smithsonian Learning Lab – Excellent K-12 “classroom ready” entries that feature sound scientific concepts have the opportunity to be included on the Smithsonian’s new Learning Lab. As part of the Learning Lab, these games will be available to educators across the nation.
  • Selection for inclusion in the National Museum of Natural History’s showcase – Select finalists will be offered the opportunity to be showcased in an arcade on the grounds of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. The showcase will take place in November.

Upcoming Pre-Jam Events:

Remake Learning Hang-out: Games in the Classroom, September 22, 2 pm EST

Extreme Event: River City Game Night, September 30, 6:30-8:30 pm EST, Koshland Science Museum, Washington, D.C. 

NOS’s Communications and Education Division is providing organizational leadership for this event and is working closely with NOAA’s Climate Program Office and other NOAA offices for subject matter expertise. Partners include Smithsonian Institution; Koshland Science Center; GlassLab; Entertainment Software Association; Wilson Center; California Academy of Science; STEMHero; Polar Learning and Responding (PoLAR) Climate Change Education Partnership; University of Oklahoma; Paleontological Research Institute (Cornell); Harmony High School (FL); Barnard College; Michigan Technological University; BrainPOP; and Zulama.

Interested in more information?

Contact Peg.Steffen@noaa.gov 

Why games?

Games are increasingly used in educational and other settings to help inspire curiosity, creativity, collaboration, optimism, and problem-solving skills.  They provide a powerful opportunity for enhancing climate literacy. Serious games address real-world challenges, compress big problems into immediate experiences, encourage systems thinking, and promote active engagement, making them particularly well suited to climate change education.  The field of games focused on climate change is growing, yet there remain gaps in the type of content covered.  

In December 2014, the White House Office of Science & Technology Policy launched the Climate Education and Literacy Initiative with the goal of connecting American students with best-availablescientificinformation about climate change. As a commitment in support of this effort, Federal and non-governmental experts are collaborating to harness the promise of educational games and interactive media to enhance understanding and awareness of climate change impacts and solutions.

NSTA continues to explore the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) by presenting a web seminar series focusing on the disciplinary core ideas. The fall series features four informative and interactive web seminars on physical science core ideas and three on Earth and space science. The series will continue in 2014 with web seminars on life science and engineering design.

The web seminar on the disciplinary core idea of Earth and Human Activity addresses questions such as “How do humans depend on Earth’s resources?” and “How do humans change the planet?”

This web seminar will provide guidance on:

  • which concepts are central to an understanding of Earth and human activity
  • how students' understanding of Earth and human activity might progress over their K-12 education; and
  • what students engaging in scientific and engineering practices to understand Earth and human activity looks like in the classroom

11:30 pm Pacific | 12:30 pm Mountain | 1:30 pm Central | 2:30 pm Eastern

Presenters: Anne Egger (Moderator; Central Washington University), Ed Geary (Western Washington University), Kathryn Baldwin (Eastern Washington University), Kyle Gray (University of Northern Iowa), Scott Linneman (Western Washington University)

This webinar is part of a series supporting teaching with InTeGrate principles, using InTeGrate-developed and curated materials as tools.

This webinar will provide an opportunity to learn from faculty and staff who are using InTeGrate teaching principles and materials as a vehicle for transforming teacher preparation. Anne Egger is an InTeGrate project leader, team leader/editor of InTeGrate's teacher preparation modules. She and Ed Geary are leaders of the Washington State STEM Teacher Preparation Implementation Program. Kathryn Baldwin, Kyle Gray, and Scott Linneman are authors of the InTeGrate teacher preparation modules, Soils, Systems, and SocietyInteractions between Water, Earth's Surface, and Human Activity, and Exploring Geoscience Methods, respectively. Together, the speakers will address the alignment of InTeGrate principals with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), demonstrate how to use InTeGrate modules to transforming teacher preparation, and how this topic extends to STEM teacher preparation in general. The webinar will include 35 minutes of presentation and 20 minutes for discussion. Participants are encouraged to both ask questions of the presenters and discuss their own experiences on the subject.

Goals

At the end of this webinar, participants will have

  • insights on the role of sustainability and social justice in science teaching
  • an understanding of the relationship between InTeGrate guiding principles and goals of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)
  • examples of how to use InTeGrate materials to develop teaching skills that intertwine the three dimensions of NGSS (science and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas)
  • greater familiarity with InTeGrate principles and resources
  • new colleagues engaged in this work

 

Logistics

Time - 11:30 pm Pacific | 12:30 pm Mountain | 1:30 pm Central | 2:30 pm Eastern
Duration - 1 hour
Format - Online web presentation via Adobe Connect web conference software with questions and discussion.
Registration - Please register for this webinar by Wednesday, June 1.
Preparation - There is no advance preparation required for this webinar.

Please email Alice Newman (anewman AT carleton.edu) if you have any questions about this event.

Presenters

Anne Egger (moderator), Geological Sciences, Science Education, Central Washington University

Ed Geary, Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education, Western Washington University

Kathryn Baldwin, Education, Eastern Washington University

Kyle Gray, Earth Science, Science Education, University of Northern Iowa

Scott Linneman, Geology, Western Washington University

 

Join us on Monday, March 2nd at 7:30 PM Eastern Time for: Western Water Resources, Climate, and Science

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar

 

Mark Twain famously noted that “whiskey is for drinking; water is for fighting over.” This is particularly true in the semi-arid western United States where the balance between water supply and water demand is nearly equal. Stress on the system is exacerbated by both human demands on the system but also climatevariability and change. Kevin Werner, NOAA’s Western Region Climate Services Director will describe the water resources environment in the Western United States including the impact of climate change. He will also describe his own experience working with decision makers in the water resources sector to utilize forecasts and science from NOAA to improve their operations. 

Following the webinar, there will be an informal discussion of the topics presented. All attendees are invited to participate. There are limited spaces for this discussion, information on joining will be provided during the event.

Please share this opportunity will all interested colleagues and Networks. 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar. Seriously, read the following and save it for reference:

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting at the start time.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting using VOIP, dial 1 (415) 655-0059 for audio. The access code is: 114-447-768. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 158-091-955

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

Monday, October 5th at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

 

To view an archive of the broadcast, go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tv7_wm6ru4M&feature=youtu.be

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project is proud to welcome Dr. Alexander E. “Sandy” MacDonald as the featured speaker for our October webinar. Dr. MacDonald is Director of NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory, and the Chief Science Advisor for NOAA Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

Dr. Alexander will discuss a national energy simulator developed by a team at NOAA that uses highly detailed weather and electric load data to determine the role that various energy sources could play in the coming decades. This “energy system simulator” can use any source of energy (coal, nuclear, wind, solar etc.) over the US 48 states, and includes a potential national High-Voltage-Direct-Current transmission network, allowing power to be shared over the domain. The simulator identifies cost-minimized geographic configurations of power plants that could continuously and reliably supply electricity over all parts of the country. 

A 2030 simulation that limits carbon emission intensity to levels found in today’s natural gas power plants, and includes a national HVDC network, would lower US electric sector emissions by up to 80%, keeping costs about the same as today. The transportation and heating and air conditioning sectors will need to have much higher levels of electric usage to realize the full potential of decarbonizing energy. The studies carried out by Dr. Alexander’s team show that this approach is feasible for the major world carbon emitters, including the US, China and Europe. There is a potential path to transforming the global energy system to much lower carbon emissions by the 2030s without major economic harm. 


Cost Optimized Realization of the US Power Generation System in 2013

 

Please share this opportunity will ALL interested colleagues and networks.

Important Information for participating in this Webinar.Seriously, read the following and save it for reference: 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial +1 (213) 929-4231 for audio. The access code is: 240-647-211. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to:http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 106-768-091

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to our Listserv at: 

https://list.woc.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/noaaclimatestewards/

        

 

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) brings considerably more attention to climate and climate change than earlier curriculum standards. The session will explore what and how to teach climate in ways connected to NGSS's three dimensions: (science and engineering practices, cross-cutting themes, and disciplinary core ideas (DCIs)), especially the most connected DCI: Human Impacts. We welcome abstracts addressing innovative roles for scientists assisting educators, student engagement with real data, materials and approaches that attend to the climate-energy connection; exemplary curricular materials, successful out-of-school programs, and strategies for dealing with anti-science sentiments.

The live streams will begin 15 minutes before the session times. View the full program. Note: All times are in PST.

Date: Wednesday, April 29, 2015
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

In July, 2012, the world witnessed a shocking event when widespread melting occurred over the surface of 97% of the Greenland Ice Sheet. According to ice core records, the last time such widespread melting occurred was in 1889. What caused such widespread melt? Was it just the warm temperatures, or is it a more complicated situation? Register today!

Dr. Mary Albert and her Dartmouth graduate students happened to be on the Greenland Ice Sheet at just the right time to gather some evidence. They excavated samples of the refrozen surface melt layer to take back to the U.S. for study, where their team investigated the physical, chemical, and isotopic aspects of that layer. They also looked deeper into the ice sheet and investigated evidence from firn (old snow) cores that contained melt layers dating back to 1889. They discovered that both in 2012 and in 1889, the warming and soot that changed the snow albedo (reflectivity) had both been necessary to synergistically create the melt; neither factor alone could have achieved melt in the cold, high, dry snow regions on the ice sheet.

Alden Adolph is now working with Mary on a project in New Hampshire to investigate climate change, snow albedo, and land use change on a project that is much closer to home. In Greenland, the soot from forest fires travels long distances to end up on the snow, where it changes the albedo. In New Hampshire, soot and aerosols can come from similar distant sources, but also from very local sources like wood stoves down the street. Alden will show how engineers and scientists use evidence to examine the importance of snow albedo even here in New England. Alden will also share ways in which she inspires younger students in the field, so that they can share in the excitement of research. Please join us for this relevant webinar, to learn how scientists used evidence from multiple sources to learn what caused the recent big melt, and why understanding your regional albedo is important to your future.

Details

Title: Fire and Ice: Snow Albedo and Our Future
Target audience: K–12 educators
Date: Wednesday, April 29, 2015
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenter: Dr. Mary AlbertAlden AdolphLinda Morris

Registration

Register today to participate in this web seminar. Upon registering you will receive an e-mail confirmation including information about the program and suggested links to visit in preparation of the event. Additional information about the web seminar will be e-mailed to you days before the program.

Each web seminar is a unique, stand-alone, program. Archives of the web seminars and the presenters’ PowerPoint presentations will be available through the links on this web page. Learn more about the features of the web seminar and read answers to frequently asked questions from participants.

 

​Please join the NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project on Tuesday, November 3rd at 7:30 pmEastern Time

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project is Pleased to welcome Ms. Tarlise "Tarlie" Townsend from the University of Michigan Ford School of Public Policy as the featured speaker for our November webinar. 

Does uncertainty about the impacts of climate change suggests that scientists aren’t sure climate change is even happening? Or, perhaps, that we should wait to take mitigation or resilience actions until further research reduces that uncertainty? These are a few of the questions students might raise about the uncertainty in climate change predictions. Ms. Townsend will address them in part one of her presentation, discussing the sources of uncertainty in climate projections, what uncertainty means for scientific consensus, and how it can actually be harnessed to make better mitigation and resilience decisions. 

One takeaway will be that effective use of uncertainty information requires close attention to what’s communicated by the media, scientists, and interest groups. In the second part of her presentation, Ms. Townsend will point out common strategies for framing risk and uncertainty information, highlighting ways that students can be smart information consumers to avoid being misled. 

 

Please share this opportunity will ALL interested colleagues and networks.

Important Information for participating in this Webinar.Seriously, read the following and save it for reference: 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial +1 (646) 307-1719 for audio. The access code is: 336-623-352. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 111-626-755

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to our Web page

 

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