The second in the four-part webinar series takes place on November 13 at 4.30 MT, 5.30 CT, 6.30 ET and 3.30 PT . The webinar will involve three hydrologists from the US Geological Survey:  Dr. Jeff Writer,Dr. Brian Ebel and Sheila Murphy.

Jeff specializes in wildfire impacts on water quality and aquatic ecosystems, coupling of ecological and engineered infrastructure, fate and transport of emerging contaminants. Brian specializes in unsaturated flow and soil physics, surface water/groundwater interaction, hillslope hydrology and runoff generation, landslide and debris flow initiation, and post-wildfire hydrology. Sheila’s research focuses on the characterization of the hydrology and water chemistry of small watersheds and how they are affected by both natural factors and disturbance.

The webinar will be streaming video from the CU Boulder campus, and will take questions from the live chat. 

The International Academy of the Digital Arts & Sciences has chosen NOAA Climate.gov as one of five nominees for the annual Webby Awards for online excellence. We’re nominated in both the 'Government' and 'Green' categories. If you're a fan of our site, please consider voting for us in those categories.

Voting is open from now until April 24. You do have to register/login, but you can use your Facebook, Google, or Twitter logins, or an email address with no additional personal info.

Vote for Climate.gov in the Government category.

Vote for the "Teaching Climate" section in the Green category.

The Webby Awards is the Internet's most respected symbol of success (much like a Grammy or an Oscar), so it's an honor just to be nominated. Out of the millions of sites, videos, ads, and mobile apps in existence, and the tens of thousands that were submitted for consideration, only a handful of Nominees were selected by the Academy for The 18th Annual Webby Awards. 

If you are a regular visitor to the Teaching Climate section of NOAA Climate.gov, you are most likely familiar with our reviewed resources, videos, and professional development events. But those are just some of the features that NOAA Climate.gov has to offer.

Across our website's four main sections, we promote public understanding of climate science and climate-related events, to make our data products and services easy to access and use, to provide climate-related support to the private sector and the Nation’s economy, and to serve people making climate-related decisions with tools and resources that help them answer specific questions.

NOAA Climate.gov is a team effort.  It would not be possible to produce and publish the site without contributions from more than a dozen personnel from across NOAA and from among our valued partners. And, most especially, our nomination wouldn't have been possible without the work of NOAA's and its partners' world-class climate science research, data products, and services that are routinely featured in the site.  

We would greatly appreciate your support, and hope you keep visiting us! 

Vote for NOAA Climate.gov in the Government category.

Vote for NOAA Climate.gov's "Teaching Climate" section in the Green category.

 

6-7:00pm ET/3-4:00pm PT

The GLOBE Program  originally developed posters and activities for teachers to help students explore the concepts of Earth as a system, find patterns and connections between and among maps containing different environmental data, and to understand the relationship between time and space in regard to global environmental data.

In 2014, a digital GLOBE Earth system ePoster is now provided by the MY NASA DATA project to extend the opportunities for learning. This digital poster provides data for 2005 through 2013 and enables interactive exploration of the data in more detail through the use of animations. The animations can be used with students to find patterns among different environmental data, understand the relationship among different environmental parameters, and understand how the data changes seasonally and over longer time scales.

In this interactive educator webinar, Tina Harte, education specialist at NASA Langley Research Center and former middle school science teacher, will explore the ePoster and activities will be discussed for K-12 students, with a focus on those meeting NGSS performance expectations, science practices and cross-cutting concepts related to Earth System Science.

NSTA continues to explore the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) by presenting a web seminar series focusing on the disciplinary core ideas. The fall series features four informative and interactive web seminars on physical science core ideas and three on Earth and space science. The series will continue in 2014 with web seminars on life science and engineering design.

The web seminar on the disciplinary core idea of Earth’s Systems addresses questions such as “What regulates weather and climate?” and “What causes earthquakes and volcanoes?”

This web seminar will provide guidance on:

  • why it's important for students to understand Earth's systems
  • how students' understanding of Earth's systems might progress over their K-12 education
  • how ideas that students have about Earth's systems can be leveraged during instruction; and
  • how to incorporate the scientific and engineering practices into instruction so students can deepen their understanding of Earth's systems

April 23rd at 6pm EDT (3pm PDT)

Ocean acidification is a complex phenomenon with profound consequences. Understanding complexity and the impact of ocean acidification requires systems thinking and collaboration, both in research and in education. Scientific advancement will help us better understand the problem and devise more effective solutions, but executing these solutions will require widespread public participation to mitigate this global problem. 

In an effort to help high school students understand today's science, the presenters have translated current systems-level ocean acidification research into a 5 week classroom module.  They will present this curriculum and provide guidance for easy implementation in high schools.  Thus far 13 different schools and over 1200 students have field tested this work – they have seen dramatic increases in engagement, and in students’ abilities to use inquiry and to challenge their mental models.  The lessons are hands-on, interdisciplinary, and specifically focus on systems thinking which has been shown to enable behavioral change.  

In this curriculum, students take on the roles of scientists and delegates as they investigate the consequences of the changing carbon cycle on the chemistry and biology of the oceans.  Students begin by critically assess different pieces of information through news articles and real-time data.  They combine their findings into a network diagram that interconnects key players of this system.  Students align themselves with stakeholders and design collaborative, cohesive experiments to test hypotheses and network properties.  They explore how carbon dioxide is produced as well as the consequences of increased CO2 levels on the pH of water, the integrity of seashells, and the life cycle of diatoms. In the culminating activity, students act as delegates when reconvening to discuss the systems consequences of ocean acidification. They make recommendations for further research, policy, and lifestyle changes.  

The module connects to other pertinent lessons being developed locally and globally and provides a clear connection to the Next Generation Science Standards and Ocean Literacy standards. 

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Space is limited.
Reserve your Webinar seat now at:
https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/229162946
After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

Following the presentation there will be a few short informational announcements relevant to the ocean acidfication communication community. Please forward this invitation to interested colleagues. We look forward to seeing you at this event!

More info on the series and upcoming webinars can be found here

This series is jointly sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries and Ocean Acidification Program.

4:00pm-5:00pm ET

Investigate the National Climate Assessment (or NCA) report during Earth Science Week with Research Scientist Alison Delgado on Wednesday, October 15, 2014 from 4-5pm ET. Get an in-depth view on how our climate is changing and what observations are telling us all in Spanish. Discover how to integrate the National Climate Assessment into your STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) classroom through NASA hands-on activities in Spanish. Engage students with NASA unique projects including how to use clouds, climate and weather through NASA’s Students’ Cloud Observations On-Line or S’COOL project. The entire session and lessons will be presented in Spanish.

For more information about this session please contact NASA Education Specialist Marilé Colón Robles at Marile.ColonRobles@nasa.gov

Presenters:

Alison Delgado, Research Scientist at the Joint Global Change Research Institute
Marilé Colón Robles, NASA Educator Professional Development Specialist at NASA Langley Research Center

About the Presenters:

Alison Delgado is a Research Scientist at the Joint Global Change Research Institute, a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Maryland at College Park. She is currently assigned to USGCRP for U.S. DOE where she is serving as Sector Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment. In that capacity, she is coordinating with government agencies, scientists, NGOs, academia and industry to develop the Third National Climate Assessment, particularly to assess impacts of climate change on sectors that include energy, agriculture and rural communities, forests, transportation and public health. She also supports the working group on Scenarios and Interpretive Science.

Marilé Colón Robles is a NASA Education Specialist at NASA Langley Research Center. She creates and teaches professional development workshops for pre-service and in-service teachers as well as informal educators all over the country, delivering these opportunities in both English and Spanish.

NASA STEM inmersa en español para el desarrollo profesional de educadores: la Evaluación Climática Nacional
Investigue los resultados de la Evaluación Climática Nacional (o NCA por sus siglas en inglés) durante la semana de la ciencias terrestres con científica de investigación Alison Delgado el miércoles, 15 de octubre, 2014 de 4-5pm ET. Obtenga un análisis detallado de cómo nuestro clima está cambiando y qué nos dicen las observaciones científicas. Descubre cómo integrar el reporte en tu salón de clase STEM a través de actividades interactivas de la NASA en español. Aprenda sobre proyectos de la NASA perfecto para estudiantes incluyendo cómo utilizar nubes, clima y el tiempo con el proyecto de observaciones de nubes estudiantiles de la NASA en línea, o S’COOL. Esta sesión será completamente en español.

Para obtener más información acerca de esta sesión contacte la especialista de educación de la NASA Marilé Colón Robles a Marile.ColonRobles@nasa.gov.

Presentadores:

Alison Delgado, científica de investigaciones en el Joint Global Change Research Institute

Marilé Colón Robles, especialista de desarrollo profesional para educadores de la NASA en el Centro de Investigaciones Langley de la NASA

NSTA continues to explore the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) by presenting a web seminar series focusing on the disciplinary core ideas. The fall series features four informative and interactive web seminars on physical science core ideas and three on Earth and space science. The series will continue in 2014 with web seminars on life science and engineering design.

The web seminar on the disciplinary core idea of Earth and Human Activity addresses questions such as “How do humans depend on Earth’s resources?” and “How do humans change the planet?”

This web seminar will provide guidance on:

  • which concepts are central to an understanding of Earth and human activity
  • how students' understanding of Earth and human activity might progress over their K-12 education; and
  • what students engaging in scientific and engineering practices to understand Earth and human activity looks like in the classroom
Wednesday, April 30th, 2014 2pm ET/11am PT
 
How will climate change affect our communities? How can we evaluate news stories about the effects of climate change in your area? What can you do to reach out to your local media and educators, to encourage them to explore the local impacts of climate change? 

The National Climate Assessment can help. 

This report from the US government—due the week of May 6th—evaluates, integrates and assesses observed and projected impacts of climate change across the country, examining how climate change will affect different communities and regions. It will be a tremendous resource for teachers, for parents, and for anyone trying to connect global climate change to local concerns 

To learn how we can make the best use of this tool, join us for a discussion with a panel of climate change specialists. These specialists will address how you can use the report to learn how climate change is already affecting your community, and how teachers can use the report to bring climate change into classrooms. 

Panelists will include: Emily Cloyd, Public Participation and Engagement Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment at USGCRP, the federal agency developing the National Climate Assessment; Paige Knappenberger, media relations associate at Climate Nexus, who tracks media coverage and helps communities connect with media outlets to address climate change; Amanda Rycerz, research officer at Habitat 7, website developers of for NCA. Moderator Minda Berbeco is a Programs and Policy Director at NCSE specializing in climate change, working with parents and educators to support the good teaching of climate change science in public schools.

 

7:00pm ET/4:00pm PT

Scientists from two NASA Earth science missions will address how their synergistic research helps us to understand Earth’s water cycle, including extreme events such as floods. This presentation will use an online concept map tool for exploring the water cycle. Unlike traditional slide-based presentations, these dynamic maps act as a resource that can be explored with an audience, instead of a one-way, linear presentation. The concept maps presented are loaded with educational assets – including images, videos, news items – that webinar participants can use in their own educational practices, presentations or for their own learning. The concept maps and other materials presented are freely available online, and instructions will be provided to give participants access to the maps after the webinars. Participants will also learn how to create their own maps.

Presenters:

Jorge Vazquez, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
J.T. Reager, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Annette deCharon, University of Maine
Carla Companion, University of Maine

About the Presenters:

JT Reager is a research scientist in the Water and Carbon cycles group at Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He received Bachelors degrees in Aerospace Engineering and Ocean Engineering from Virginia Tech, a masters degree in Physical Oceanography from the University of Delaware, and a Ph.D in Earth System Science from the University of California, Irvine. He is currently using gravity-based observations of water movement across the planet from NASA’s GRACE mission to study flood and drought occurence and to measure the strength of the global water cycle. He’s interested in modeling and remote sensing of the Earth system, and implications for society and natural resources management.

Jorge Vazquez is the NASA Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) scientist supporting Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Surface Salinity. He received his Bachelor of Science in Physics from the University of Miami, his masters degree in Oceanography from the university of Rhode Island and his Ph.D in geological sciences from the University of Southern California. He currently serves as the chair of the Applications and User Services Technical Advisory Group for the Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST). His research interests include applying high resolution SST data to understand better coastal dynamics. Outside interests include biking, hiking and tennis as well as serving the community through his Rotary Club.

Annette deCharon has leveraged her background in earth and ocean sciences into extensive experience in designing, implementing and maintaining online tools and content. She and her team currently manage the NASA Aquarius, Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE.net), and COSEE Ocean Systems websites. They have also conducted 56 webinars using their own concept-mapping software, which was developed to bridge ocean resources with effective education practice. These webinars have reached 2112 people in 48 U.S. states/territories and 28 non-U.S. countries.

Carla Companion is a research associate at the University of Maine (Umaine) working on many different grant-funded projects – including work with the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE) Ocean Systems, NASA Aquarius and SPURS missions, and the Ocean Observatories Initiative. Prior to joining the UMaine School of Marine Sciences, she earned her MS in Environmental Studies/Environmental Education from Antioch University New England and her B.S. in Marine and Freshwater Biology from the University of New Hampshire. In addition to helping run Scientist-Educator Collaborative workshops and other projects, she has helps to facilitate webinars featuring ocean scientists and to inform development of concept mapping ​software.

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) brings considerably more attention to climate and climate change than earlier curriculum standards. The session will explore what and how to teach climate in ways connected to NGSS's three dimensions: (science and engineering practices, cross-cutting themes, and disciplinary core ideas (DCIs)), especially the most connected DCI: Human Impacts. We welcome abstracts addressing innovative roles for scientists assisting educators, student engagement with real data, materials and approaches that attend to the climate-energy connection; exemplary curricular materials, successful out-of-school programs, and strategies for dealing with anti-science sentiments.

The live streams will begin 15 minutes before the session times. View the full program. Note: All times are in PST.

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