This video, from Yale Climate Connections, explores the 2014 melting of the West Antarctic ice sheet that captured headlines. Interviews, animations, and news broadcasts explore what the melting meant for both the future of some of the Antarctic glaciers and sea level rise, and informs the viewer how seafloor terrain influences the speed of ice sheet melt.

Date: Wednesday, April 29, 2015
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

In July, 2012, the world witnessed a shocking event when widespread melting occurred over the surface of 97% of the Greenland Ice Sheet. According to ice core records, the last time such widespread melting occurred was in 1889. What caused such widespread melt? Was it just the warm temperatures, or is it a more complicated situation? Register today!

Dr. Mary Albert and her Dartmouth graduate students happened to be on the Greenland Ice Sheet at just the right time to gather some evidence. They excavated samples of the refrozen surface melt layer to take back to the U.S. for study, where their team investigated the physical, chemical, and isotopic aspects of that layer. They also looked deeper into the ice sheet and investigated evidence from firn (old snow) cores that contained melt layers dating back to 1889. They discovered that both in 2012 and in 1889, the warming and soot that changed the snow albedo (reflectivity) had both been necessary to synergistically create the melt; neither factor alone could have achieved melt in the cold, high, dry snow regions on the ice sheet.

Alden Adolph is now working with Mary on a project in New Hampshire to investigate climate change, snow albedo, and land use change on a project that is much closer to home. In Greenland, the soot from forest fires travels long distances to end up on the snow, where it changes the albedo. In New Hampshire, soot and aerosols can come from similar distant sources, but also from very local sources like wood stoves down the street. Alden will show how engineers and scientists use evidence to examine the importance of snow albedo even here in New England. Alden will also share ways in which she inspires younger students in the field, so that they can share in the excitement of research. Please join us for this relevant webinar, to learn how scientists used evidence from multiple sources to learn what caused the recent big melt, and why understanding your regional albedo is important to your future.

Details

Title: Fire and Ice: Snow Albedo and Our Future
Target audience: K–12 educators
Date: Wednesday, April 29, 2015
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenter: Dr. Mary AlbertAlden AdolphLinda Morris

Registration

Register today to participate in this web seminar. Upon registering you will receive an e-mail confirmation including information about the program and suggested links to visit in preparation of the event. Additional information about the web seminar will be e-mailed to you days before the program.

Each web seminar is a unique, stand-alone, program. Archives of the web seminars and the presenters’ PowerPoint presentations will be available through the links on this web page. Learn more about the features of the web seminar and read answers to frequently asked questions from participants.

 

During this web seminar for educators of students in grades 7-12 participants will learn how to incorporate weather data from NASA’s Earth Observing Satellites into meteorology lessons while addressing national science and technology standards, including the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Educators will explore the benefits of monitoring the climate system with satellites and review how satellites observe key atmospheric elements and features that are important for studying long-term climate trends. Participants will explore the contributions that satellites make to improve our understanding, monitoring, and prediction of climate. The web seminar will also cover the challenges involved in monitoring climate with satellites. Register today!

In the featured activity students use data from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). GOES provides real-time weather data for use in short-term weather forecasting, space environment monitoring, and research and development. POES primarily provides data for long-range weather forecasting, ensuring that non-visible data, for any region of Earth, are no more than six hours old.

Next Generation Science Standards addressed in this web seminar:

  • MS-ESS2 Earth's Systems

    • Science and Engineering Practices

      • Planning and Carrying Out Investigations
    • Disciplinary Core Ideas
    • The Roles of Water in Earth's Surface Processes
    • Weather and Climate
    • Crosscutting Concepts

      • Cause and Effect

Common Core Mathematics Standards addressed in this web seminar:

  • Grade 8

    • Statistics and Probability

In this web seminar we will explore the use of computer models for generating projections about the future of Earth's climate. The presenters will demonstrate the Very, Very Simple Climate Model—free educational software that enables students to try out "what if" scenarios about changes to our planet's climate during the coming century. Participating educators will learn about the scientific basis of this simple model, derived from observations (ice core data) of past climates during recent ice ages.

Register today!

Presenters: Scott Denning and Randy Russell

Dates & Times: Wed and Thu, August 3rd and 4th, 2016 from 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM ET

 

NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project (CSEP) is collaborating with Federal, State and NGO partners to convene four climate-science workshops for formal and informal educators. Participants will hear from and interact with climate science, education and communication experts, and visit research facilities to explore foundational technologies and innovations in Earth-system research. This workshop in Charleston, South Carolina will focus on the region and topical impacts of climate change, with a goal of connecting educators and their students/audiences to the best-available, science-based information and resources about climate change.

Registration for the Charleston, South Carolina workshop is open, however there are attendance limits for the workshop, and we are advertising them nationally.  Availability will be on a first come first serve basis, so register early for your workshop. Participation in the workshops is free, but attendees are responsible for arranging their own transportation, lodging and meals unless otherwise indicated in workshop details.

 

Place:

South Carolina Aquarium

100 Aquarium Wharf

Charleston, SC 29401

Tel. (800) 722-6455

 

Primary Contacts:

EV Bell, ev.bell@scseagrant.org

Liz Fly, Elizabeth.Fly@scseagrant.org

Jaime Thom, jthom@scaquarium.org

Dawn Davis, dawn_davis@nps.gov

 

Featured Presentations

  • Weather and Climate 101

  • The Rising Tide: Impacts of Sea Level Rise in Charleston

  • A Historical Perspective: Fort Sumter and Rising Sea Level

  • Coastal Resilience: Adapting to Change  

  • From Sea Turtles to Red Knots: Biological Impacts of Climate Change (Panel)

 

Featured Activities

  • Climate Icebreaker (NOAA)

  • Climate Change 20 Questions (COSEE SE/Sea Grant Activity)

  • Climate Resiliency (NOAA)

  • Climate Cart (SC Aquarium)

  • Red Knot Activity (SC Aquarium)

  • Sea Turtles and Climate Change (COSEE SE/Sea Grant Activity)

  • Carbon: The World Traveler (COSEE SE/SC Sea Grant Activity)

  • The Effects of Sea Level Rise on Salt Marshes

  • Climate Change Sleuthing: Using Technology to Investigate Charleston

  • Tours:

    • Fort Sumter National Park

    • SC Aquarium

    • Downtown Charleston

 

Notes - Workshop Costs, Food & Lodging:

  • There is no cost to attend this workshop.

  • Participants must make their own travel and overnight arrangements; please contact EV Bell for suggested location: ev.bell@scseagrant.org

  • Meals will not be provided; participants are welcome to bring their own lunch to the workshop or select from restaurants nearby. A list of suggested restaurants will be provided.

 

Thursday, March 26th - 3:30-4:45pm MT/4:30pm CT/5:30pm ET

The National Climate Assessment, released in May of 2014, summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, touching on many disciplines: earth science, biology, human health, engineering, technology, economics, and policy. Explore the document with a lead NCA author, then learn about related educator resources with Kristen Poppleton from the Will Steger Foundation. Discover how to bring these resources into classroom lessons, engage students in data collection and analysis, share visualizations and citizen science projects. Focus this month will be on the Great Plains region.  Watch for additional regions to be featured in upcoming “Ask US” sessions.

 

This event is a Google Hangout and will be broadcast live on YouTube. Questions may be submitted during the Hangout using the comments section or via Twitter –use  #AskNICE

The AskNICE Professional Development events occurs every month on the third Thursday of the month from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM Eastern Time (US & Canada). Effective 11/21/2013 until 3/20/2014.  

Monday, April 11th at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

 

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project welcomes Margie Turrin & Dave Porter from Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory as our featured speakers this month.

Sea level change is one of the most visible connections between all our earth systems - oceans, atmosphere, ice, land, and of course life on earth – including us! Changes in sea level are measurable on local and a global scales providing an accessible way to connect climate to education – and there is data – lots of data! Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Polar Team has been measuring changes in ice sheets and oceans for decades, working in locations ranging from small motorboats with local Greenlandic fishermen to collect ocean temperature measurements up against the ice sheet, to large aircraft measuring the depth and surface changes of ice sheets from the air. All of these help us determine changes in sea level and develop predictions and impacts for the future. To make the data available and accessible we've developed ‘Sea Level Rise: Polar Explorer’ an interactive map based 'app'. The app offers an interactive guided tour through the many layers of science that impact sea level rise. Framed around a series of questions user can chose their own pathway and level of complexity, while exploring authentic science data in engaging and accessible ways. The app reinforces the NGSS science practice of asking questions around data. Join us for this quick dive into sea level change! 

 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar - Seriously, read this and save it for your reference: 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial 1-(562)-247-8321 for audio. The access code is: 761-870-253. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 113-282-707

 

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to our Web page 

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to our Listserv 

The National Climate Assessment, released in May of 2014, summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, touching on many disciplines: earth science, biology, human health, engineering, technology, economics, and policy. Explore the document with lead NCA author, Sarah Trainor, then learn about related educator resources with Jessica Brunacini from the PoLAR Partnership.

Discover how to bring these resources into classroom lessons, engage students in data collection and analysis, share visualizations and citizen science projects. 

Focus this month will be on the Alaska region. Watch for additional regions to be featured in upcoming “Ask US” sessions.

Also explore the NCA Education Resources for the Alaska Region to help to unpack the key messages of the region and point to related, high-quality online resources.

This NASA event is a Google Hangout and will be broadcast live on YouTube. Questions may be submitted during the Hangout using the comments section or via Twitter –use  #AskNICE

The AskNICE Professional Development events occurs every month on the third Thursday of the month from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM Eastern Time (US & Canada). Effective 11/21/2013 until 3/20/2014.  

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