This hands-on activity will provide students with an understanding of the issues that surround environmental clean-up. Students will create their own oil spill, try different methods for cleaning it up, and then discuss the merits of each method in terms of effectiveness (cleanliness) and cost. They will be asked to put themselves in the place of both an environmental engineer and an oil company owner who are responsible for the clean-up.

Wednesday, April 30th, 2014 2pm ET/11am PT
 
How will climate change affect our communities? How can we evaluate news stories about the effects of climate change in your area? What can you do to reach out to your local media and educators, to encourage them to explore the local impacts of climate change? 

The National Climate Assessment can help. 

This report from the US government—due the week of May 6th—evaluates, integrates and assesses observed and projected impacts of climate change across the country, examining how climate change will affect different communities and regions. It will be a tremendous resource for teachers, for parents, and for anyone trying to connect global climate change to local concerns 

To learn how we can make the best use of this tool, join us for a discussion with a panel of climate change specialists. These specialists will address how you can use the report to learn how climate change is already affecting your community, and how teachers can use the report to bring climate change into classrooms. 

Panelists will include: Emily Cloyd, Public Participation and Engagement Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment at USGCRP, the federal agency developing the National Climate Assessment; Paige Knappenberger, media relations associate at Climate Nexus, who tracks media coverage and helps communities connect with media outlets to address climate change; Amanda Rycerz, research officer at Habitat 7, website developers of for NCA. Moderator Minda Berbeco is a Programs and Policy Director at NCSE specializing in climate change, working with parents and educators to support the good teaching of climate change science in public schools.

 

A one day workshop for educators interested on learning to expand their climate change interpretation at their own institutions. Through a grant from NOAA, several institutions around the country have developed and thoroughly tested four storyboards that use visual aides to tell the story. Each storyboard has been developed keeping in mind how to effectively communicate climate change in a positive way that leads the listener to action. Lunch will be provided.

When, Where and Who

April 28 - Buttonwood Park Zoo, New Bedford, MA – Annette Brickley abrickley.edu@gmail.com

 

What

You can expect to gain:

  • Four visual narratives, suitable to be used on a spherical screen (such as Science on a Sphere®, Magic Planet®, or HyperGlobe®), flat screen, or handheld tablet.
  • Theory, based on social and cognitive sciences, used to develop the visual narratives.
  • Opportunities to practice and models for training other colleagues to use these materials.
  • A toolkit to take back to your institution - including the four visual narratives, background information about the theoretical basis for each narrative, relevant climate and ocean science information and videos that illustrate each visual narrative being used by an educator.

 

About Visualizing Change: Training and Tools to support Informal Educators

Visualizing Change is a 3-year grant funded by NOAA’s Office of Education to help build capacity in the informal science education field to more effectively use global data sets to communicate about climate change, its impact on coastal zones and marine life and how people are working to use scientific information to shape our world.

How

To register or for additional information, please email the contact person at your preferred location/date.

The 2015 first annual Earth Educators' Rendezvous will bring together researchers and practitioners working in all aspects of undergraduate Earth education. We welcome faculty from all disciplines who are interested in improving their teaching about the Earth, administrators from geoscience departments and interdisciplinary programs that want to become stronger, and education researchers of all types. Join the Rendezvous for 2 or 3 days or stay the whole week.

Program

The Earth Rendezvous program will bring together these themes into a rich tapestry of workshops, contributed talks and posters, plenary sessions, and working groups. Drawing across the work currently taking place in geoscience, environmental, and sustainability education, meeting attendees will have the opportunity to learn broadly, focus on a particular issue or challenge, or something in between. All are invited to submit abstracts to the contributed program of posters and short presentations.

Registration and Abstract Submission

Abstract Deadline: March 1, 2015
Early Registration Deadline: April 13, 2015

 

Part of the InTeGrate and Cutting Edge

Programs for Improved Undergraduate Education On the Cutting Edge is managed by NAGT

Program Sponsors: National Science Foundation, The National Association of Geoscience Teachers, The Geological Society of America, The American Geophysical Union

Are you apprehensive teaching about climate change? Not sure what to believe after reading different headlines and hearing controversies? ClimateChangeLIVE will help you sort it out for yourself and be confident in educating your students about this important topic! This webinar will be presented by education specialists from three federal agencies immersed in climate change research and issues. We’ll be joined by EPA’s 2012 Climate Communicator of the Year, the Alliance for Climate Education (ACE). ACE will share tips about how to engage your students, and how your class can be part of the solution, addressing climate change head-on. We’ll feature highlights of materials focused on the process of science, how to judge whether what you’re reading is good science, as well as misconceptions about climate change. The Department of Energy will highlight the Energy Literacy Framework, which identifies the Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts one would understand to be energy and climate literate.

Presenters: U.S. Forest Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Dept. of Energy, Alliance for Climate Education

Monday, May 5, 2014 at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

The main presentation this month will be given by Jerry Meehl, a senior scientist in the University Center for Atmospheric Research's (UCAR) Climate and Global Dynamics Division. Jerry  will talk about the processes involved in producing the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report as well as the National Climate Assessment (NCA).
  
A second presentation will be given by Mindy Berbeco, the Programs and Policy Director at the National Center for Science Education will further discuss the NCA, NCAnet - A group of organizations working with the National Climate Assessment to engage producers and users of climate science and impacts information across the United States, and their efforts to involve educators in unpacking the teachable moments from the report, and how you can become involved and have an impact on a nation-wide scale.

A one day workshop for educators interested on learning to expand their climate change interpretation at their own institutions. Through a grant from NOAA, several institutions around the country have developed and thoroughly tested four storyboards that use visual aides to tell the story. Each storyboard has been developed keeping in mind how to effectively communicate climate change in a positive way that leads the listener to action. Lunch will be provided.

When, Where and Who

May 6 - Aquarium of the Pacific, Long Beach, CA – Dave Bader dbader@lbaop.org

What

You can expect to gain:

  • Four visual narratives, suitable to be used on a spherical screen (such as Science on a Sphere®, Magic Planet®, or HyperGlobe®), flat screen, or handheld tablet.
  • Theory, based on social and cognitive sciences, used to develop the visual narratives.
  • Opportunities to practice and models for training other colleagues to use these materials.
  • A toolkit to take back to your institution - including the four visual narratives, background information about the theoretical basis for each narrative, relevant climate and ocean science information and videos that illustrate each visual narrative being used by an educator.

 

About Visualizing Change: Training and Tools to support Informal Educators

Visualizing Change is a 3-year grant funded by NOAA’s Office of Education to help build capacity in the informal science education field to more effectively use global data sets to communicate about climate change, its impact on coastal zones and marine life and how people are working to use scientific information to shape our world.

How

To register or for additional information, please email the contact person at your preferred location/date.

 

This is a FREE one-day workshop.  Lunch will be provided.  Participants are responsible for travel and parking costs. 

May (6, 13, 20, 27) and June (17, 24), 2015
Virtual Workshop

 

One of the best ways for students to understand the critical Earth issues facing humanity is through the analysis and interpretation of actual data. Fortunately, there are now many organizations that not only monitor many geophysical and geochemical properties of the earth but provide the data in user-friendly ways. Whether it is through maps, images, animations, or raw data, these data can be mined and interpreted by undergraduates in ways that allow them to develop an understanding of both the relevant critical Earth issues and of issues related to the reliability, errors, and significance associated with scientific conclusions and assertions.

This workshop aims to help instructors of undergraduate classes develop classroom activities, demonstrations, and research opportunities on topics of current societal relevance and interest using new online resources of geoscience data. These activities will be added to the extensive Cutting Edge online teaching activities collection.

REGISTRATION DEADLINE: March 1, 2015

This workshop is part of the On the Cutting Edge professional development program for current and future geoscience faculty, and is sponsored by the National Association of Geoscience Teachers with funding provided by NAGT, and a grant from the National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education and other contributing sponsors.

 

Image Credit: The carbon dioxide visualization was produced by a computer model called GEOS-5, created by scientists at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Global Modeling and Assimilation Office. 

ClimateChangeLIVE distance learning adventure, brings you a wealth of climate change education resources and programs from 17 Federal agencies and non-profit organizations! We offer educators, a source of trusted, science-based materials, which are correlated to science education standards. 

This webinar will highlight climate change education resources and programs from three of our partners. NOAA has a wealth of climate change education resources and programs to share with you. Learn about citizen science opportunities from Project Budburst. The Department of Energy will share the BITES (Buildings Industry Technology Electricity Scenarios) Tool which students can use to make policy changes in the four sectors and run scenarios to see how their changes impact CO2 output as well as primary energy source dependence. DOE will also highlight a variety of reliable sources of information related to energy concepts and data.

Presenters: Dept. of Energy, Project Budburst, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

May 29th, 2014 12:00 to 1:00 PM ET

Climate change in the Great Lakes region and beyond is expected to promote shifts in the ranges and phenology of well-known plant and animal species. These shifts are often a result of changes in the availability of food and shelter, as well as temperature. Knowing more about these potential impacts will help wildlife managers and nature enthusiasts alike to adapt to and potentially mitigate some of the resulting changes in wildlife diversity.

This webinar will cover:

  • an overview of potential climate change impacts on wildlife
  • effects of a changing climate on the phenology of migratory birds
  • impacts of shifting climate conditions (such as drought and flooding) on the vulnerability of species of special concern
  • climate change effects on Broad-tailed Hummingbirds as a result of shifts in the timing of flowering of their nectar flowers glacier lily, dwarf larkspur, and Indian paintbrush, which they rely on during spring migration

The webinar is free. To register click here. Once registered, you will receive a confirmation email with log-in information.

 

Agenda

Welcome and Introduction: Jill Jentes Banicki, Ohio Sea Grant

Assessing the Vulnerability of Wildlife to Climate Change: Benjamin Zuckerberg, Dept of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, UW-Madison

Climate Change Effects on Broad-tailed Hummingbirds: Amy Iler, Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Maryland and The Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory

Question/Answer and Wrap Up

Discussion: Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions via a live chat after the presentation.

 

Visit changingclimate.osu.edu to view previous webinars and other climate resources.

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