In this classroom activity, students measure the energy use of various appliances and electronics and calculate how much carbon dioxide (CO2) is released to produce that energy.

Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

Did you know that there are at least several hundred tiny particles in one cubic centimeter of air? Did you know that there is “good” ozone and “bad” ozone? We’ll explore what’s in the air we breathe; how and why scientists measure air pollution, and the growing popularity of citizen science. You will learn a fun hands-on activity for students to build their own monitor using the latest micro sensors. These air sensor kits measure particle pollution (commonly known as dust) and turn on light bulbs based on the level in the atmosphere. 

Details

Target audience: K-12 teachers
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenter: Dr. Gayle Hagler

 

Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

The energy we use to heat and light our homes, drive to work and school and watch our favorite television show can come from a variety of traditional and renewable energy sources -- crude oil, natural gas, wind farms, hydroelectric power and coal-fired power plants. But how do we understand the costs and benefits of the energy choices we make? What happens if the mix of energy sources changes in the future? What does this all mean for our climate, air, water, and overall environmental quality? Learn about the scientific tools EPA scientists are developing to help states, communities and Tribes make decisions about energy use now and in the future. Explore an interactive board game developed by EPA scientists called Generate! that explores energy choices and the environment and gets students “energized” in some friendly competition.

Details

Target audience: K-12 teachers
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenter: Dr. Rebecca Dodder

April 17, 2014, at 4 p.m. EDT

From proxy data to direct observations, all signs point to the same conclusion: Earth's climate system is warming at an unprecedented rate. Join presenter Margaret Mooney from the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies to learn more about how scientists measure and document warming trends along with tools to teach this topic to your students.

Certificates of professional development hours are available upon request. Additional session dates will be announced soon.

"Ask NICE" Online Professional Development Series

Join the NASA Innovations in Climate Education, or NICE, team for the final webinar of the 2013-14 school year in their series of Google Plus Hangout professional development sessions. Extended workshops will be held over the summer with those who have participated in the series. A new series of online Ask NICE sessions will begin in the fall.

For more information, visit https://nice.larc.nasa.gov/asknice/ or http://dln.nasa.gov. Questions about this series should be sent to Bonnie Murray at bonnie.murray@nasa.gov.

Monday, February 1st at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

Getting Real: Health in the Teaching of Climate and Earth Science
 

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project welcomes Dr. John M. Balbus, M.D., M.P.H., Senior Advisor for Public Health to the Director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences as our featured speaker this month.

Presentation Abstract: 

The impacts on health of climate change as well as the societal responses to climate change are varied and significant. In the past five years, recognition of the importance of the health implications of climate change has grown enormously, from major reports in the premier international medical journal Lancet to messaging from the President about the US Clean Power Plant rule and Climate Action Plan. Understanding how climate change and climate variability affect people’s health and well being is a foundational aspect of basic climate literacy. For teachers, integrating content and exercises on health provides an opportunity to engage students in earth science with projects that both demonstrate the relevance of the science and also require development of critical analytic and synthetic skills. Health content related to climate change can also augment curricula in the social sciences, history, literature, and the visual arts. This talk will summarize the health implications of climate change and encourage discussion of how health content can help teachers achieve their educational goals. 
 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial 1-(914)-614-3221 for audio. The access code is: 367-785-127. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 145-578-259

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to our Web page

 

During this web seminar for educators of students in grades 7-12 participants will learn how to incorporate weather data from NASA’s Earth Observing Satellites into meteorology lessons while addressing national science and technology standards, including the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Educators will explore the benefits of monitoring the climate system with satellites and review how satellites observe key atmospheric elements and features that are important for studying long-term climate trends. Participants will explore the contributions that satellites make to improve our understanding, monitoring, and prediction of climate. The web seminar will also cover the challenges involved in monitoring climate with satellites. Register today!

In the featured activity students use data from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). GOES provides real-time weather data for use in short-term weather forecasting, space environment monitoring, and research and development. POES primarily provides data for long-range weather forecasting, ensuring that non-visible data, for any region of Earth, are no more than six hours old.

Next Generation Science Standards addressed in this web seminar:

  • MS-ESS2 Earth's Systems

    • Science and Engineering Practices

      • Planning and Carrying Out Investigations
    • Disciplinary Core Ideas
    • The Roles of Water in Earth's Surface Processes
    • Weather and Climate
    • Crosscutting Concepts

      • Cause and Effect

Common Core Mathematics Standards addressed in this web seminar:

  • Grade 8

    • Statistics and Probability

September 3, 2015 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM EDT

As part of the climate change goal, DOE is planning to host eight Regional Climate Change Impact Webinars as part of the MIE initiative. We are looking to host speakers who will discuss regional efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change impacts as they relate to the President's Climate Action Plan with a particular focus on engaging minority communities. 

Experts will provide findings from the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER), energy job strategies, and the National Climate Impact Assessment. As part of the QER discussion, we plan to share climate-based findings related to national security, resilience, the grid of the future, environment, grid siting, and shared transport. This discussion will outline federal energy policy objectives, proposals, and actions, particularly as they relate to climate change and resilience for underserved communities. For more information on the QER, please visit http://energy.gov/epsa/quadrennial-energy-review-qer. 

An expert on energy and climate change job strategies will discuss job opportunities by region as well as regional options for renewables and energy efficiency. We will share region-specific information about the energy workforce across a variety of energy sectors and experience levels. 

The final section of the webinar will focus on findings from the National Climate Assessment and their regional applicability to those communities who are disproportionally impacted by the effects of climate change. We hope to host regional experts who can share Assessment findings and provide potential tools for resilience among minority and tribal communities.

This event is a Google Hangout and will be broadcast live on YouTube. Questions may be submitted during the Hangout using the comments section or via Twitter –use  #AskNICE

The AskNICE Professional Development events occurs every month on the third Thursday of the month from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM Eastern Time (US & Canada). Effective 11/21/2013 until 3/20/2014.  

Time: 3:30 p.m. ET / 2:30 p.m. CT / 1:30 p.m. MT / 12:30 p.m. PT

One of the key needs for successful implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards are resources that are well-aligned to the standards. The Educators Evaluating the Quality of Instructional Products (EQuIP) Rubric for science provides criteria by which to measure the alignment and overall quality of lessons and units with respect to the NGSS. The rubric is an effective tool that enables teachers and administrators, in teams or individually, to review existing instructional materials to determine what revisions are needed, provide constructive criterion-based feedback to developers, and identify exemplars/models for teachers' use within and across states. Register today!

The web seminar will provide guidance on:

  • the key attributes resources should have to meet the letter and spirit of NGSS
  • the structure and features of the rubric
  • using the rubric to select and supplement curriculum resources

Details

Title: Evaluating Resources for NGSS: The EQuIP Rubric
Target audience: Educators of grades K-12
Dates: Tuesday, July 29, 2014
Time: 3:30 p.m. ET / 2:30 p.m. CT / 1:30 p.m. MT / 12:30 p.m. PT
Duration: 90 minutes
Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenters: Brian J. Reiser and Joe Krajcik

Application deadline is Monday, March 16, 2015

The National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation announces a professional development opportunity for interpreters who focus on climate change and ocean issues.

About the National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI)

NNOCCI is a collaborative effort led by the New England Aquarium with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, the FrameWorks Institute, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the National Aquarium in Baltimore, Monterey Bay Aquarium, the New Knowledge Organization in partnership with Pennsylvania State University and the Ohio's Center for Science and Industry. With support from the NSF Climate Change Education Partnership program, NNOCCI's goal is to establish a national network of professionals who are skilled in communicating climate science to the American public in ways that are engaging and stimulate productive dialog.

What is a Study Circle? 
A NNOCCI Study Circle is a cross-disciplinary learning group made up of peers with expertise from fields of professional interpretation, climate and ocean sciences and communications and cultural sciences. Through a series of facilitated in-person meetings, webinars, conference calls and practical activities, participants build knowledge of ocean and climate science and communications and cultural sciences. They apply lessons learned to communications or educational opportunities in the context of their work environment through several cycles of development, practice, sharing and reflection. Participants continue to build knowledge of ocean and climate science and communications and cultural sciences throughout the Study Circle, and gain resources and materials to train staff, volunteers, and other audiences at their home institutions.

The Study Circle has two major phases. During the first six months participants engage in a formal, facilitated learning process. Upon graduating participants join the larger network of colleagues and continue to experiment, evaluate and share successes from their work with each other. Through the Study Circle, participants will learn about the latest findings in climate science and oceanography and how to apply these to interpretive contexts in their home institutions. In addition participants build trust and lasting bonds among colleagues from multiple institutions who share an interest in developing effective ways to engage audiences in learning about climate and ocean change.

Who is the Study Circle for?
The Study Circle is intended for pairs of staff members from informal learning centers such as zoos, aquariums, science centers, National Parks, natural preserves, and other institutions that have an interest in coastal or ocean issues.

Costs and Compensation:
NNOCCI will pay for direct costs1 for participation in Study Circle activities that are not also part of participants' routine work. This includes travel, lodging and food for in-person meetings. NNOCCI will also provide a $3,000 stipend2 to up to 10 institutions which support two staff members to participate in the Study Circle.

Key Criteria:
Applicants should have institutional support before they apply. The institution should meet the following criteria:

  • Have an ocean or coastal ecology  connection within their work.
  • Have regular interpretation programming led by staff and/or volunteers.
  • Have interest in addressing issues related to climate change.
  • Be willing to support two staff members to fully participate in both the learning and evaluation phases of the Study Circle. Each applicant must fill out their own separate application.
  • Be willing to support NNOCCI’s evaluation efforts, which will entail an onsite visitor survey that the two staff members or volunteers will collect after presentations or other education programming. This survey effort will take place twice: 1) in the months immediately before the Study Circle meetings, and 2) six months after the training is complete.

Criteria for individual participants:

  • Able to commit to 3 in-person meetings (see dates, below) and about 3 hours/week of Study Circle work from approximately August 2015 through December 2015.
  • Able to commit to coordinating one-page visitor impact surveys at your institution several months prior to the first Study Circle and in the six months following the last Study Circle meeting.
  • Have regular opportunities to apply information and learning from the Study Circle through professional responsibilities such as interpretation for visitors, written communications, educational programming or presenting training for colleagues or volunteer interpreters.
  • Have supervisor support for full participation in the Study Circle.
  • Have a colleague who meets all of the criteria above as a co-applicant.

In Person Meeting Dates:*

Study Circle 'A'

  • September 16 and 17, 2015 (Boston, MA)
  • October 28 and 29, 2015 (Woods Hole, MA)
  • December 2 and 3, 2015 (location to be announced)

Study Circle 'B'

  • September 23 and 24, 2015 (Boston, MA)
  • November 4 and 5, 2015 (Woods Hole, MA)
  • December 9 and 10, 2015 (location to be announced)

*Please note that we are offering two distinct study circle options for Fall 2015. You and your partner must commit to the same study circle dates. If these dates do not fit for you and your institution, please note that additional Study Circles are being planned for and Spring and Fall 2016. 

How to apply:

Both applicants from an institution should submit a separate application. Click here to fill out the online application. Application deadline is Monday, March 16, 2015.

Please email nnocci@neaq.org with questions or concerns.

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