In this activity, students assume the role of a team of architects that has been commissioned to build a solar house containing both active and passive solar components. First, they must design the house and then build a model. The model is tested to determine how well it utilizes solar energy.

This is a semester-long jigsaw project in which students work in teams to explore the effects of energy resource development on local water resources, economics, and society. Students are presented with a contemporary energy resource development issue being debated in their community. They research the water, geological, economic, and social impact of the project, and then either defend or support the development proposal.

This Flash-based simulation explores the relationship between carbon emissions and atmospheric carbon dioxide using two main displays: (1) graphs that show the level of human-generated CO2 emissions, CO2 removals, and the level of CO2 in the atmosphere, and (2) a bathtub animation that shows the same information as the graphs. The bathtub simulation illustrates the challenges of reducing greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere.

This PBS video focuses on sea level rise in Norfolk, Virginia and how the residents are managing the logistical, financial and political implications. Science journalists who have been studying Norfolk's rising sea level problems are interviewed, as well as local residents who are being impacted.

This short video surveys the different current and potential sources of energy - both non-renewable and renewable. It provides some discussion of the pros and cons of the different sources and explains how they are used to produce energy that people can use.

This is a video overview of the history of climate science, with the goal of debunking the idea that in the 1970s, climate scientists were predicting global cooling.

This video profiles glaciologist Lonnie Thompson and his research into tropical mountain glaciers as a way to understand climate history. Beginning in the 1970s, Thompson recognized that tropical ice cores contain information relating to tropical climate phenomena, including El NiÃo events and monsoons. These phenomena are not archived in ice from polar regions. Thompson explains that his archive of ice cores is full of clues that, taken together with records collected from around the world, can help scientists create a timeline that tells Earth's climate story.

In this activity, students collect weather data over several days or weeks, graph temperature data, and compare the temperature data collected with long-term climate averages from where they live. Understanding the difference between weather and climate and interpreting local weather data are important first steps to understanding larger-scale global climate changes.

May 29th, 2014 12:00 to 1:00 PM ET

Climate change in the Great Lakes region and beyond is expected to promote shifts in the ranges and phenology of well-known plant and animal species. These shifts are often a result of changes in the availability of food and shelter, as well as temperature. Knowing more about these potential impacts will help wildlife managers and nature enthusiasts alike to adapt to and potentially mitigate some of the resulting changes in wildlife diversity.

This webinar will cover:

  • an overview of potential climate change impacts on wildlife
  • effects of a changing climate on the phenology of migratory birds
  • impacts of shifting climate conditions (such as drought and flooding) on the vulnerability of species of special concern
  • climate change effects on Broad-tailed Hummingbirds as a result of shifts in the timing of flowering of their nectar flowers glacier lily, dwarf larkspur, and Indian paintbrush, which they rely on during spring migration

The webinar is free. To register click here. Once registered, you will receive a confirmation email with log-in information.



Welcome and Introduction: Jill Jentes Banicki, Ohio Sea Grant

Assessing the Vulnerability of Wildlife to Climate Change: Benjamin Zuckerberg, Dept of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, UW-Madison

Climate Change Effects on Broad-tailed Hummingbirds: Amy Iler, Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Maryland and The Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory

Question/Answer and Wrap Up

Discussion: Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions via a live chat after the presentation.


Visit to view previous webinars and other climate resources.

Join us on Monday, April 13th at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

There is increasing recognition of the significance of how Traditional Environmental Knowledge (TEK) can inform our understanding of the impacts of climate change and strategies for adaptation and mitigation. Indigenous people bring a collective knowledge of the land, sky and sea and provide a crucial foundation for community-based adaptation and mitigation. Indigenous knowledge has been long recognized as a key source of information and insight in domains such as forestry, traditional medicine, biodiversity conservation, resource management, impact assessment, and natural disaster preparedness and response. 
NOAA’s Climate Stewards Education Project is honored collaborate with Cultural Specialists from the Smithsonian Museum of the American Indian, Project Indigenous, and Educators from the University of Wisconsin-Extension to present this webinar on TEK, how it can inform our understanding of a changing climate's impacts on coastal and inland Indigenous people, and useful teaching materials to bring these ideas together. 
  • Dennis Zotigh, Kiowa, San Juan Pueblo and Santee Dakota, Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, will provide an opening song. 
  • Scott Frazier, Crow/Santee, Project Indigenous, will discuss climate change impacts on sacred sites/sacred places, and what TEK can offer in adapting to climate change impacts. 
  • Albert “Abby” Ybarra, Yaqui-Tohono O'Odham, Project Indigenous, will present Three Sisters Gardening, an ancient method of farming and how it can be used to connect youth to the earth, annual cycles of growth, and climate change. 
  • Cathy Techmann, University of Wisconsin-Extension, will present G-WOW “Gikinoo’wizhiwe Onji Waaban” (Guiding for Tomorrow), a climate service learning initiative integrating climate change research, TEK, and place-based evidence of climate change impacts on traditional Ojibwe lifeways to provide knowledge about what can be done to mitigate or adapt to a changing climate for people of all culture

Following the webinar, there will be an informal discussion of the topics presented. All attendees are invited to participate. There are limited spaces for this discussion, information on joining will be provided during the event.

Please share this opportunity will all interested colleagues and Networks.

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar

Important Information for participating in this Webinar. Seriously, read the following and save it for reference:

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting at the start time.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting using VOIP, dial +1 (415) 655-0059 for audio. The access code is: 926-695-389. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: The ID Number for this Webinar is: 126-553-435

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: