Learn about integrating climate change education into your classroom or informal education programming, get an introduction to regionally relevant climate science, and hear about how other educators have used these materials. The webinar will be presented by educators who have used the resources in their own teaching, both in the classroom and in place-based education.

Certificates of attendance for professional development contact hours can be requested after the webinar; instructions will be provided during the session.

The presentation will cover:

  • Ohio Sea Grant’s updated Great Lakes Climate Change Curriculum
  • climate and Great Lakes literacy principles
  • informal resources to supplement and expand lesson plans

Monday, April 7, 2014 at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

Frank Niepold, NOAA Climate Program Office's Education coordinator, will discuss developing student’s 21st century skills by incorporating digitally available activities, videos, and visualizations into the classroom. The rigorously reviewed digital educational resources developed by the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) and syndicated through NOAA’s Climate.gov web site will be examined. A focal point will be how to teach a climate and energy learning progression across elementary through high school grades taking into account contact time and coherence matter constraints.

Monday, March 7th at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project welcomes Dr. T.J. Fudge, Paleoclimate Researcher, University of Washington, and Ms. Louise Huffman, Education Program Manager, US Ice Drilling Program as their featured speakers this month.

What's the latest in Antarctic paleo-climate research? Tune in to learn about the nation's newest ice core expedition...SPICE Core (South Pole Ice Core)! Investigators seeking data from the past 40,000 years are drilling a 1500 meter ice core to study chemical isotopes, tiny particles called aerosols and atmospheric gases trapped in the earth's great southern ice sheet. The goal is to investigate environmental change since the last glacial/inter-glacial transition.

Why was the South Pole targeted? What criteria affect the specific site selection for drilling? What new kinds of technology were required? Dr. T.J. Fudge will answer your questions, and share the latest from his work in the Pole's extreme environment.

Educational resources from the US Ice Drilling Program will be showcased by IDPO’s Education Program Manager, Louise Huffman.

Important Information for participating in this Webinar -
 
Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial 1-(213)-929-4212 for audio. The access code is: 234-544-393. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 128-311-523

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to our Web page

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to our Listserv

7:00pm ET/4:00pm PT

Scientists from two NASA Earth science missions will address how their synergistic research helps us to understand Earth’s water cycle, including extreme events such as floods. This presentation will use an online concept map tool for exploring the water cycle. Unlike traditional slide-based presentations, these dynamic maps act as a resource that can be explored with an audience, instead of a one-way, linear presentation. The concept maps presented are loaded with educational assets – including images, videos, news items – that webinar participants can use in their own educational practices, presentations or for their own learning. The concept maps and other materials presented are freely available online, and instructions will be provided to give participants access to the maps after the webinars. Participants will also learn how to create their own maps.

Presenters:

Jorge Vazquez, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
J.T. Reager, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Annette deCharon, University of Maine
Carla Companion, University of Maine

About the Presenters:

JT Reager is a research scientist in the Water and Carbon cycles group at Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He received Bachelors degrees in Aerospace Engineering and Ocean Engineering from Virginia Tech, a masters degree in Physical Oceanography from the University of Delaware, and a Ph.D in Earth System Science from the University of California, Irvine. He is currently using gravity-based observations of water movement across the planet from NASA’s GRACE mission to study flood and drought occurence and to measure the strength of the global water cycle. He’s interested in modeling and remote sensing of the Earth system, and implications for society and natural resources management.

Jorge Vazquez is the NASA Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) scientist supporting Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Surface Salinity. He received his Bachelor of Science in Physics from the University of Miami, his masters degree in Oceanography from the university of Rhode Island and his Ph.D in geological sciences from the University of Southern California. He currently serves as the chair of the Applications and User Services Technical Advisory Group for the Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST). His research interests include applying high resolution SST data to understand better coastal dynamics. Outside interests include biking, hiking and tennis as well as serving the community through his Rotary Club.

Annette deCharon has leveraged her background in earth and ocean sciences into extensive experience in designing, implementing and maintaining online tools and content. She and her team currently manage the NASA Aquarius, Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE.net), and COSEE Ocean Systems websites. They have also conducted 56 webinars using their own concept-mapping software, which was developed to bridge ocean resources with effective education practice. These webinars have reached 2112 people in 48 U.S. states/territories and 28 non-U.S. countries.

Carla Companion is a research associate at the University of Maine (Umaine) working on many different grant-funded projects – including work with the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE) Ocean Systems, NASA Aquarius and SPURS missions, and the Ocean Observatories Initiative. Prior to joining the UMaine School of Marine Sciences, she earned her MS in Environmental Studies/Environmental Education from Antioch University New England and her B.S. in Marine and Freshwater Biology from the University of New Hampshire. In addition to helping run Scientist-Educator Collaborative workshops and other projects, she has helps to facilitate webinars featuring ocean scientists and to inform development of concept mapping ​software.

This course explores the science of climate change. Students will learn how the climate system works; what factors cause climate to change across different time scales and how those factors interact; how climate has changed in the past; how scientists use models, observations and theory to make predictions about future climate; and the possible consequences of climate change for our planet. The course explores evidence for changes in ocean temperature, sea level and acidity due to global warming. Students will learn how climate change today is different from past climate cycles and how satellites and other technologies are revealing the global signals of a changing climate. Finally, the course looks at the connection between human activity and the current warming trend and considers some of the potential social, economic and environmental consequences of climate change.

April 17, 2014, at 4 p.m. EDT

From proxy data to direct observations, all signs point to the same conclusion: Earth's climate system is warming at an unprecedented rate. Join presenter Margaret Mooney from the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies to learn more about how scientists measure and document warming trends along with tools to teach this topic to your students.

Certificates of professional development hours are available upon request. Additional session dates will be announced soon.

"Ask NICE" Online Professional Development Series

Join the NASA Innovations in Climate Education, or NICE, team for the final webinar of the 2013-14 school year in their series of Google Plus Hangout professional development sessions. Extended workshops will be held over the summer with those who have participated in the series. A new series of online Ask NICE sessions will begin in the fall.

For more information, visit https://nice.larc.nasa.gov/asknice/ or http://dln.nasa.gov. Questions about this series should be sent to Bonnie Murray at bonnie.murray@nasa.gov.

Date: Saturday, March 12, 2016
Time:
10 a.m. – 3 p.m. ET
9 a.m. – 2 p.m. CT
8 a.m. – 1 p.m. MT
7 a.m. – 12 p.m. PT

NSTA, in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), would like to invite you to attend the virtual conference titled: Climate Science in the Classroom. This half-day virtual conference will feature climate scientists and education specialists who will share both their knowledge about climate science as well as classroom-ready resources that educators can use with their students.

View the Conference Agenda

Attend the virtual conference to:

  • Explore the evidence for climate change and its impact
  • Learn about specific climate science awareness tools and strategies you can use in your your classroom
  • Ask questions of climate experts
  • Engage in dialogue with science educators from across the world

All educators registered to the virtual conference will receive access to the conference archives to watch later on demand. A certificate of attendance/participation is available for a modest fee. Please see the registration page for details.

Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

What's the latest in Antarctic paleo-climate research? This web seminar, targeting educators of students in grades 7-12, will introduce participants to the nation's newest ice core expedition… SPICE Core! Investigators seeking data from the past 40,000 years are drilling a 1500 meter ice core to study chemical isotopes, tiny particles called aerosols and atmospheric gases trapped in earth's great southern ice sheet. The goal is to investigate environmental change since the last glacial/interglacial transition. Why was the South Pole targeted? What criteria affect the specific site selection for drilling? What new kinds of technology were required? Dr. T.J. Fudge will answer your questions, and share what it's like to work in the Pole's extreme environment. Register today!

A related, video-enhanced educational activity, focusing on "Polar Science and Engineering", will be presented by Linda Morris for you to share with your students. The interactions modeled in the video between scientists and engineers will serve as the basis of a reflective activity, Drilling Back Through Time, that introduce the students in your classroom to the NGSS's "Scientific and Engineering Practices". Educational resources from the US Ice Drilling Program will be showcased.

Details

Title: SPICE Core: Investigating Past Climate at the South Pole
Target audience: Educators of students in grades 7-12
Date: Wednesday, December 10, 2014 
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenters: Dr. T. J. Fudge and Linda M. Morris

Underwritten by the U.S. Ice Drilling Program Office and the National Science Foundation
 

Are you apprehensive teaching about climate change? Not sure what to believe after reading different headlines and hearing controversies? ClimateChangeLIVE will help you sort it out for yourself and be confident in educating your students about this important topic! This webinar will be presented by education specialists from three federal agencies immersed in climate change research and issues. We’ll be joined by EPA’s 2012 Climate Communicator of the Year, the Alliance for Climate Education (ACE). ACE will share tips about how to engage your students, and how your class can be part of the solution, addressing climate change head-on. We’ll feature highlights of materials focused on the process of science, how to judge whether what you’re reading is good science, as well as misconceptions about climate change. The Department of Energy will highlight the Energy Literacy Framework, which identifies the Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts one would understand to be energy and climate literate.

Presenters: U.S. Forest Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Dept. of Energy, Alliance for Climate Education

The International Academy of the Digital Arts & Sciences has chosen NOAA Climate.gov as one of five nominees for the annual Webby Awards for online excellence. We’re nominated in both the 'Government' and 'Green' categories. If you're a fan of our site, please consider voting for us in those categories.

Voting is open from now until April 24. You do have to register/login, but you can use your Facebook, Google, or Twitter logins, or an email address with no additional personal info.

Vote for Climate.gov in the Government category.

Vote for the "Teaching Climate" section in the Green category.

The Webby Awards is the Internet's most respected symbol of success (much like a Grammy or an Oscar), so it's an honor just to be nominated. Out of the millions of sites, videos, ads, and mobile apps in existence, and the tens of thousands that were submitted for consideration, only a handful of Nominees were selected by the Academy for The 18th Annual Webby Awards. 

If you are a regular visitor to the Teaching Climate section of NOAA Climate.gov, you are most likely familiar with our reviewed resources, videos, and professional development events. But those are just some of the features that NOAA Climate.gov has to offer.

Across our website's four main sections, we promote public understanding of climate science and climate-related events, to make our data products and services easy to access and use, to provide climate-related support to the private sector and the Nation’s economy, and to serve people making climate-related decisions with tools and resources that help them answer specific questions.

NOAA Climate.gov is a team effort.  It would not be possible to produce and publish the site without contributions from more than a dozen personnel from across NOAA and from among our valued partners. And, most especially, our nomination wouldn't have been possible without the work of NOAA's and its partners' world-class climate science research, data products, and services that are routinely featured in the site.  

We would greatly appreciate your support, and hope you keep visiting us! 

Vote for NOAA Climate.gov in the Government category.

Vote for NOAA Climate.gov's "Teaching Climate" section in the Green category.

 

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