October 6, 2014 at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

Our Featured speaker is Dr. Richard Alley, Evan Pugh Professor of Geosciences and Associate of the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute at The Pennsylvania State University. He will be giving our main presentation Bungy Jumping off the Ice-Core Roller Coaster: Ice-Core Records of Global Warming and Abrupt Climate Change

Dr. Alley will discuss how ice cores provide remarkably accurate records of climate changes locally, regionally and globally. Ice-core records of ice age cycles contribute to our understanding that CO2 has been “the biggest control knob” of Earth’s overall climate, and thus that if we continue burning fossil fuels and releasing the CO2, we will have large impacts on climate. But, ice-core records also show how changes in ocean circulation have had large, rapid regional impacts. The existence of such abrupt climate changes contributes to our understanding that, if scientists are wrong about the influence of CO2 on climate, changes are likely to be more-damaging than expected rather than less-damaging. 

Please forward this invitation to all interested colleagues and networks

Speaker: Minda Berbeco, PhD, Programs and Policy Director, National Center for Science Education
Resources: Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN),PINEMAP, WSF Curriculum

How can educators teach children about local impacts of climate change? Where can they find good resources for activities and up-to-date scientific information from reputable sources? Minda Berbeco is the Programs and Policy Director at the National Center for Science Education. She will be talking about the newly released National Climate Assessment, a scientific and governmental resource that demonstrates the local impacts on climate change and projections for the future. She will present on how to bring the NCA into the classroom and what vetted resources are available. We will focus on resources to make climate change local and relevant.

One, 60-minute virtual session - Thursday, August 18
9:00 am Pacific | 10:00 am Mountain | 11:00 pm Central | 12:00 pm Eastern

Registration deadline: Wednesday, August 17

Presenters: Anne Egger (Central Washington University), Joy Branlund, (Southwestern Illinois College), Megan D'Errico, (San Diego State University)

This webinar is part of a series supporting teaching with InTeGrate principles, using InTeGrate-developed and curated materials as tools.

Developing graduate students' teaching capacity is essential to instilling good teaching practices and beneficial teaching skills in future faculty. This webinar will provide an opportunity to hear from geoscience faculty and graduate students who have developed InTeGrate modules, led InTeGrate implementation training workshops, and adopted InTeGrate modules after participating in a training workshop. Anne Egger, an InTeGrate project leader, will discuss the InTeGrate training workshops she ran for graduate students and post-docs with the Stanford InTeGrate Implementation Program and she will give an overview of the Stanford implementation program.Megan D'Errico, a Research Specialist at San Diego State University, will talk about her experiences as a training workshop participant at Stanford University and her adoption of the InTeGrate module Climate of Change. Joy Branlund, from Southwestern Illinois College is an author of the Human's Dependence on Earth's Mineral Resources module and she will talk about the thinking behind the module and how it has worked in her courses. The webinar will include 30 minutes of presentations and 25 minutes of discussion. Participants are encouraged to both ask questions of the presenters and discuss their own experiences developing graduate students' teaching capacity. 

Goals

At the end of this webinar, participants will have:

  • new models for supporting development of graduate students and post-docs teaching skills
  • examples of the value for graduate students and post-docs to learn about teaching
  • a roadmap for empowering graduate students and post-docs to improve their own teaching
  • approaches to scaffolding teaching with material design

Resources, including presentation slides and the Screencast recording after the webinar

For more information on the series and to learn more about InTeGrate visit: serc.carleton.edu/integrate/workshops/index.html

 

Education and communication are among the most powerful tools the nation has to bring hidden hazards to public attention, understanding, and action.

Informing an Effective Response to Climate Change, NRC (2010)

Bumble bees, extreme weather events, sea ice loss, and drought. The impacts of climate change are being felt by communities and creatures across our nation—and world. The Forum on Digital Media for STEM Learning: Climate Education will explore how the stories and science behind these impacts are increasingly being integrated into classroom instruction and STEM education contexts, with a focus on digital media. Held at WGBH’s Brighton studio on Monday, November 9, 2015, this highly-interactive and fast-paced event will examine emerging narratives in climate education, digital media tools and products that show unique potential for educational settings, and promising modes of engagement for students, teachers and schools.

 

Please explore the program and line-up of presenters. Click here to find out how to watch the Forum live.

LIVE STREAM timing for each strand:
 
9:15  - 11 AM ET Strand 1: Standards and Storylines 
 
11:30 AM – 1:15 PM ET Strand 2: Emerging Platforms and Products 
 
2 – 3 PM ET Strand 3: New Modes of Engagement
 

A note about the Program Design of the Forum event:

This Forum event is designed for both live, in-person audiences, as well as viewers who wish to watch and interact via online streaming and social media. The three topic strands have been developed around the content, technology and pedagogy of Climate Education, and reference the TPCK model for professional learning. Strands provide a blend of theory and practice, with anchoring keynote presentations that are followed by shorter “case study” presentations that offer early findings and emergent research. Each strand concludes with a hosted panel discussion with in-studio and online audiences.

These strands are followed by an attendee-driven “unconference,” where participants discuss and develop ways to implement some of the ideas from the panels that had resonated with them. Attendees of the 2014 Forum event reported that the “unconference” session, and additional networking opportunities, provide a real “value-add” for in-person attendance. A dedicated online community space containing tools and resources will continue to be accessible along with the work products from the Forum events, laying the foundation for a larger community of practice for sharing best practices and lessons learned.

Plan to join us for a day of learning and sharing about climate change and climate change education. What do we know about how people learn about climate change? Learn about the most effective strategies to help others make informed decisions. Hear from experts about the outlook for the D.C. region. Discover resources that exist in our community that could help your program or project.

To apply: Please complete an application before February 13th, 2013

More information about CUSP can be found here.

Webinar 1: Tuesday, October 7 - 6:30 pm EST / 3:30 PST/ 12:30 HST (90 min)

Join us for the first of two webinars for an introduction to our newest NOAA Data in the Classroom curriculum module – Investigating Coral Bleaching Using Real Data. You'll hear from NOAA experts about coral bleaching and how scientists use remote sensing tools to study stresses on coral health. The NODE curriculum developers will introduce the new lesson plans and demonstrate how our unique scaffolding can help students develop skills to access and use online data.

The NOAA Data in the Classroom Project develops curriculum designed to help teachers and students use real scientific data to explore dynamic Earth processes and understand the impact of environmental events on a regional or global scale. Each curriculum module features easy-to-use curriculum materials and specially designed websites that enable students to access and use real data. Our newest curriculum module – Investigating Coral Bleaching Using Real Data – is being developed for grades 6-8.

  • Introduction to the NODE Project
  • Coral Bleaching 101 with NOAA Experts
  • Coral Reef Watch: Studying Corals from Space
  • Overview of the entire curriculum module

March 12, 2014
Time: LIVE from 1 - 2 p.m. Eastern Time
Archive available after March 12

This program will feature:

  • LIVE interactive conversation about climate change with experts
  • Send us your tweets, post on Facebook, or send an e-mail to climate change experts

For links and resources mentioned in the webcast are posted on the ClimateChangeLive page.

Tuesday, September 6 at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project welcomes John McLaughlin, NOAA's Citizen Science Coordinator as our featured speaker this month. 

You don’t have to be a professional scientist to contribute to our understanding of Earth’s climate. Much of what we know about weather and climate is thanks to the involvement of the public. Thomas Jefferson maintained an almost unbroken record of weather observations between 1776 and 1816, and George Washington took his last observation just a few days before he died. Today, there are many opportunities to study climate through citizen science, a form of open collaboration where members of the public participate in the scientific process to address real-world issues. These opportunities provide authentic learning experiences for their participants and stimulate a conservation ethic. In this presentation John will present some of the leading projects available for you to join. 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar:

  • We recommend you log into the webinar AT LEAST 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.

  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option to listen to this presentation. All participants will be muted for the duration of the broadcast.

  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial 1-(914)-614-3221 for audio. The access code is: 923-595-217. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar

  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 127-161-891

Visit the NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project Web page for more information

Sign up to our Listserv to receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities.

Monday, December 7th at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

This webinar takes a deep dive into the use of simple models in climate education. Dr. Russell will explore some fundamental concepts of climate science that allow students to use simple models to actively investigate the scientific concepts. He'll start with a basic calculation of the "theoretical" global average temperature of our home planet - first walking through the science and math behind the calculations, then using a simple computer-based model that allows students to explore multiple "what if" scenarios. Next, he'll look at the Greenhouse Effect's impact on global temperatures and present a physical model that illustrates the Greenhouse Effect and the layered structure of Earth's atmosphere. After that, Dr. Russell will present how some straightforward math connects anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions with future global temperatures - and then explore another computer-based simulation that allows students to test the impact of various emission scenarios on future global temperatures. 

Finally, Dr. Russell will take a look at an extensive online list of simulations, games, and virtual labs for climate education. Time permitting, he'll show some Greenhouse Effect simulations and a paleoclimate (tree rings) simulation. 

 

Please share this opportunity will ALL interested colleagues and networks.

Important Information for participating in this Webinar. Seriously, read this and save it for your reference: 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial +1 (415) 930-5321 for audio. The access code is: 551-581-773. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is:  116-878-155

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to their Web page

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to their Listserv

 

 

Turn on your teaching with the 2013 Summer Institute for Energy Education. Made possible by generous support from MN Center for Energy and the Environment.

 

Whether you teach STEM, art or anything in between, energy efficiency, conservation and renewables are present and future solutions that can be integrated into your school and teaching.

Every participant has the opportunity to earn CEU credits and graduate credits from Hamline University.

 

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