Turn on your teaching with the 2013 Summer Institute for Energy Education. Made possible by generous support from MN Center for Energy and the Environment.

 

Whether you teach STEM, art or anything in between, energy efficiency, conservation and renewables are present and future solutions that can be integrated into your school and teaching.

Every participant has the opportunity to earn CEU credits and graduate credits from Hamline University.

 

Dates & Times: Wed and Thu, August 3rd and 4th, 2016 from 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM ET

 

NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project (CSEP) is collaborating with Federal, State and NGO partners to convene four climate-science workshops for formal and informal educators. Participants will hear from and interact with climate science, education and communication experts, and visit research facilities to explore foundational technologies and innovations in Earth-system research. This workshop in Charleston, South Carolina will focus on the region and topical impacts of climate change, with a goal of connecting educators and their students/audiences to the best-available, science-based information and resources about climate change.

Registration for the Charleston, South Carolina workshop is open, however there are attendance limits for the workshop, and we are advertising them nationally.  Availability will be on a first come first serve basis, so register early for your workshop. Participation in the workshops is free, but attendees are responsible for arranging their own transportation, lodging and meals unless otherwise indicated in workshop details.

 

Place:

South Carolina Aquarium

100 Aquarium Wharf

Charleston, SC 29401

Tel. (800) 722-6455

 

Primary Contacts:

EV Bell, ev.bell@scseagrant.org

Liz Fly, Elizabeth.Fly@scseagrant.org

Jaime Thom, jthom@scaquarium.org

Dawn Davis, dawn_davis@nps.gov

 

Featured Presentations

  • Weather and Climate 101

  • The Rising Tide: Impacts of Sea Level Rise in Charleston

  • A Historical Perspective: Fort Sumter and Rising Sea Level

  • Coastal Resilience: Adapting to Change  

  • From Sea Turtles to Red Knots: Biological Impacts of Climate Change (Panel)

 

Featured Activities

  • Climate Icebreaker (NOAA)

  • Climate Change 20 Questions (COSEE SE/Sea Grant Activity)

  • Climate Resiliency (NOAA)

  • Climate Cart (SC Aquarium)

  • Red Knot Activity (SC Aquarium)

  • Sea Turtles and Climate Change (COSEE SE/Sea Grant Activity)

  • Carbon: The World Traveler (COSEE SE/SC Sea Grant Activity)

  • The Effects of Sea Level Rise on Salt Marshes

  • Climate Change Sleuthing: Using Technology to Investigate Charleston

  • Tours:

    • Fort Sumter National Park

    • SC Aquarium

    • Downtown Charleston

 

Notes - Workshop Costs, Food & Lodging:

  • There is no cost to attend this workshop.

  • Participants must make their own travel and overnight arrangements; please contact EV Bell for suggested location: ev.bell@scseagrant.org

  • Meals will not be provided; participants are welcome to bring their own lunch to the workshop or select from restaurants nearby. A list of suggested restaurants will be provided.

 

April 23rd at 6pm EDT (3pm PDT)

Ocean acidification is a complex phenomenon with profound consequences. Understanding complexity and the impact of ocean acidification requires systems thinking and collaboration, both in research and in education. Scientific advancement will help us better understand the problem and devise more effective solutions, but executing these solutions will require widespread public participation to mitigate this global problem. 

In an effort to help high school students understand today's science, the presenters have translated current systems-level ocean acidification research into a 5 week classroom module.  They will present this curriculum and provide guidance for easy implementation in high schools.  Thus far 13 different schools and over 1200 students have field tested this work – they have seen dramatic increases in engagement, and in students’ abilities to use inquiry and to challenge their mental models.  The lessons are hands-on, interdisciplinary, and specifically focus on systems thinking which has been shown to enable behavioral change.  

In this curriculum, students take on the roles of scientists and delegates as they investigate the consequences of the changing carbon cycle on the chemistry and biology of the oceans.  Students begin by critically assess different pieces of information through news articles and real-time data.  They combine their findings into a network diagram that interconnects key players of this system.  Students align themselves with stakeholders and design collaborative, cohesive experiments to test hypotheses and network properties.  They explore how carbon dioxide is produced as well as the consequences of increased CO2 levels on the pH of water, the integrity of seashells, and the life cycle of diatoms. In the culminating activity, students act as delegates when reconvening to discuss the systems consequences of ocean acidification. They make recommendations for further research, policy, and lifestyle changes.  

The module connects to other pertinent lessons being developed locally and globally and provides a clear connection to the Next Generation Science Standards and Ocean Literacy standards. 

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Space is limited.
Reserve your Webinar seat now at:
https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/229162946
After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

Following the presentation there will be a few short informational announcements relevant to the ocean acidfication communication community. Please forward this invitation to interested colleagues. We look forward to seeing you at this event!

More info on the series and upcoming webinars can be found here

This series is jointly sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries and Ocean Acidification Program.

NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project (CSEP) is collaborating with Federal, State and NGO partners to convene four climate-science workshops for formal and informal educators. Participants will hear from and interact with climate science, education and communication experts, and visit research facilities to explore foundational technologies and innovations in Earth-system research. This workshop in Boulder, CO will focus on the region and topical impacts of climate change, with a goal of connecting educators and their students/audiences to the best-available, science-based information and resources about climate change.

Register for the Boulder, CO workshop is open, however there are attendance limits for the workshop, and we are advertising them nationally.  Availability will be on a first come first serve basis, so register early for your workshop. Participation in the workshops is free, but attendees are responsible for arranging their own transportation, lodging and meals unless otherwise indicated in workshop details.  

All attendees will receive a certificate acknowledging their participation in the workshop as well as the number of professional development hours they have engaged in.  

Below are the location, dates, locations, and attendance limits for the upcoming workshop. Registration forms will be shut down when registration for that workshop has reached capacity. You will receive an email confirming your participation in the workshop.  The capacity for this workshop is 30 Participants.

Important Note: If you are a foreign national and wish to attend the workshops in Boulder, CO you MUST send an email to the lead contact for that workshop: Teresa Eastburn, eastburn@ucar.edu

 

Climate Education Workshop: Detailed Information

Boulder, Colorado

Dates & Times: Thursday through Saturday, June 25th-27th, 2015. Thu/Fri 8:00am-6:00pm, Sat 8:00am-3:30pm

 

Place: National Center for Atmospheric Research /University Center for Atmospheric Research Mesa Laboratory

1850 Table Mesa Drive.

Boulder, Colorado 80305

303.497.1000 

 

Important Note: If you are a foreign national and wish to attend this workshop, you MUST note it in your registration and send an email to: Teresa Eastburn, eastburn@ucar.edu

 

Primary Contacts:  

Teresa Eastburn, eastburn@ucar.edu

Bruce Moravchik, Bruce.moravchik@noaa.gov

Peg Steffen, Peg.Steffen@noaa.gov

 

Featured Presentations:

  • The Landscape of Climate change and its Impacts: A Global to Local Perspective.
  • Meet the Scientists - 1:1 Rotating Small Group Conversations with Climate Scientists 
  • NOAA’s Science on a Sphere - Visualizing the impacts of Climate Change Globally and Locally
  • Water and the West: Regional Impacts of Climate Change and Citizen Science Monitoring Programs.
  • A Strategy to Decarbonize US Energy: What Needs to Be Done and How Teachers, Students,  and Communities Can Mitigate and Adapt to the Impacts of Climate Change.

 

Featured Activities:

  • Tour and Presentations at

    • U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Lab.
    • U.S. Geological Survey Ice Core Lab. Participants should bring a winter coat, hat, and gloves in order to experience the ice core storage freezer within the facility.
    • NCAR Wyoming Super-Computing Center 

 

  • Hands-On Activity Demonstrations:

    • The Energy Wedge Game
    • Glaciers A Go-Go & Glaciers Now and Then
    • The Systems Game
    • The Very Simple Climate Model & other Climate Simulations for the Classroom.

 

Notes on Food & Lodging:

  • There is no cost to attend this workshop.
  • Participants must make their own travel and overnight arrangements.
  • Meals will not be provided, but participants will be informed of the numerous dining options.
  • A limited block of rooms have been reserved below the Federal Government Rate ($111/night excluding taxes) at the Days Inn, Boulder. 5397 South Boulder Road, Hwy36 Table Mesa Exit, Boulder, CO 80303 (http://www.daysinn.com/hotels/colorado/boulder/days-hotel-boulder/hotel-overview, http://www.dayshotelboulder.com/). To reserve a room at this rate call Days Inn at 303.499.4422 by Friday, May 22 and identify yourself as booking a room as part of the “NCAR/UCAR/NOAA Group” No rooms will be held at this rate past this date. 
  • A series of shuttles organized by the workshop will be available for limited transportation to/from this hotel and the NCAR/UCAR facility and downtown locations at the beginning and end of each workshop day.  

For questions concerning the workshop including location and program questions, contact the workshop lead:

Boulder, CO  - Teresa Eastburn, eastburn@ucar.edu

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This workshop is part of the White House Climate Education and Literacy Initiative

 

Dive into the classroom and outdoor components of the Will Steger Foundation's Minnesota's Changing Climate (MCC) curriculum. 

This program will serve to meet your needs as a professional classroom or outdoor educator - whether you are experienced with MCC or just starting out. As climate change impacts can be seen and experienced right here in Minnesota, our students need to be literate in climate sciences to be the leaders of change and solutions tomorrow.

Every participant has the opportunity to earn CEU credits and graduate credits from Hamline University.

Monday, April 11th at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

 

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project welcomes Margie Turrin & Dave Porter from Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory as our featured speakers this month.

Sea level change is one of the most visible connections between all our earth systems - oceans, atmosphere, ice, land, and of course life on earth – including us! Changes in sea level are measurable on local and a global scales providing an accessible way to connect climate to education – and there is data – lots of data! Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Polar Team has been measuring changes in ice sheets and oceans for decades, working in locations ranging from small motorboats with local Greenlandic fishermen to collect ocean temperature measurements up against the ice sheet, to large aircraft measuring the depth and surface changes of ice sheets from the air. All of these help us determine changes in sea level and develop predictions and impacts for the future. To make the data available and accessible we've developed ‘Sea Level Rise: Polar Explorer’ an interactive map based 'app'. The app offers an interactive guided tour through the many layers of science that impact sea level rise. Framed around a series of questions user can chose their own pathway and level of complexity, while exploring authentic science data in engaging and accessible ways. The app reinforces the NGSS science practice of asking questions around data. Join us for this quick dive into sea level change! 

 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar - Seriously, read this and save it for your reference: 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting when it begins.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting listening to the webinar using VOIP, you may dial 1-(562)-247-8321 for audio. The access code is: 761-870-253. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 113-282-707

 

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project come to our Web page 

To receive information on upcoming webinars, book/discussion club meetings, professional development workshops and opportunities, sign up to our Listserv 

Wednesday, April 30th, 2014 2pm ET/11am PT
 
How will climate change affect our communities? How can we evaluate news stories about the effects of climate change in your area? What can you do to reach out to your local media and educators, to encourage them to explore the local impacts of climate change? 

The National Climate Assessment can help. 

This report from the US government—due the week of May 6th—evaluates, integrates and assesses observed and projected impacts of climate change across the country, examining how climate change will affect different communities and regions. It will be a tremendous resource for teachers, for parents, and for anyone trying to connect global climate change to local concerns 

To learn how we can make the best use of this tool, join us for a discussion with a panel of climate change specialists. These specialists will address how you can use the report to learn how climate change is already affecting your community, and how teachers can use the report to bring climate change into classrooms. 

Panelists will include: Emily Cloyd, Public Participation and Engagement Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment at USGCRP, the federal agency developing the National Climate Assessment; Paige Knappenberger, media relations associate at Climate Nexus, who tracks media coverage and helps communities connect with media outlets to address climate change; Amanda Rycerz, research officer at Habitat 7, website developers of for NCA. Moderator Minda Berbeco is a Programs and Policy Director at NCSE specializing in climate change, working with parents and educators to support the good teaching of climate change science in public schools.

 

NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project (CSEP) is collaborating with Federal, State and NGO partners to convene four climate-science workshops for formal and informal educators. Participants will hear from and interact with climate science, education and communication experts, and visit research facilities to explore foundational technologies and innovations in Earth-system research. This workshop in St. Petersburg Florida will focus on the region and topical impacts of climate change, with a goal of connecting educators and their students/audiences to the best-available, science-based information and resources about climate change.

Registration for the St. Petersburg Florida workshop is open, however there are attendance limits for the workshop, and we are advertising them nationally.  Availability will be on a first come first serve basis, so register early for your workshop. Participation in the workshops is free, but attendees are responsible for arranging their own transportation, lodging and meals unless otherwise indicated in workshop details.  

All attendees will receive a certificate acknowledging their participation in the workshop as well as the number of professional development hours they have engaged in.  

Below are the location, dates, locations, and attendance limits for the upcoming workshop. Registration forms will be shut down when registration for that workshop has reached capacity. You will receive an email confirming your participation in the workshop. The capacity for this workshop is 50 Participants.

Climate Education Workshop Detailed Information

St. Petersburg, Florida

Dates & Times: Sunday and Monday, May 17th and 18th, 2015. 8:00am - 5:00pm

 

Place: Sirata Beach Resort & Conference Center 5300 Gulf Blvd, St. Pete Beach, FL 33706 (855) 344-5999 http://www.sirata.com

This workshop will precede a Sea Grant-supported Climate Community of Practice (CCOP) Annual Meeting in the same location. Information on both the CCOP annual meeting and the climate education workshop can be at: http://masgc.org/climate-outreach-community-of-practice/annual-meeting-2015.

 

Primary Contacts:  

Amy Clark, Amy.Clark@noaa.gov

Molly Harrison, Molly.Harrison@noaa.gov

Bruce Moravchik, Bruce.moravchik@noaa.gov

 

Featured Presentations:

  • Paleoclimatology, Paleoceanography, Human Impact on Climate Cycles and Tools for Teaching it
  • Impacts of Climate Change on Human and Biological Ecosystems
  • Impact of Climate Change on Manatees and Their Habitats
  • Palynological Research, What it is, How Its Used to Understanding Climate Change, and Tools for Teaching it
  • Lessons Learned: Best Practices for Teaching Climate Change

 

Featured Activities:

  • Develop your climate change “Elevator Speech” for connecting to climate skeptics
  • See demonstrations of how scientists and educators have made climate data and research findings available and relevant to the education community (included a visit from two of Busch Gardens Tampa’s Ambassador Animals)
  • Activities to increase participant climate science knowledge
  • Participate in demonstrations on how to teaching climate change and related topics.
  • Field Trip to Eckerd College - See how a local college implements student run stewardship programs related to climate education and resilience. Including: composting, recycling, community gardening, invasive removal, and a bike share programs. 

 

Notes on Food & Lodging:

  • There is no cost to attend this workshop.
  • Participants must make their own travel and overnight arrangements.
  • Meals will not be provided, but there are numerous dining options nearby.
  • A limited block of rooms have been reserved at the Federal Government Rate ($104/night excluding taxes) at the Sirata Beach Resort & Conference Center. To reserve a room at this rate, call the Sirata at 1-800-344-5999 by Thursday, April 30 and identify yourself as booking a room as part of the “NOAA Education Workshop Group” No rooms will be held at this rate past this date. 

For questions concerning the workshop including location and program questions, contact the workshop lead: Amy Clark, Amy.Clark@noaa.gov

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This workshop is part of the White House Climate Education and Literacy Initiative

 

Learn to teach basic climate science and empower your students to take action. Practice teaching the carbon cycle, investigate "garbology," and develop simple student action projects. Content is focused on grades five to eight.

Location: Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, CA

 

12:00 pm Pacific | 1:00 pm Mountain | 2:00 pm Central | 3:00 pm Eastern

Presenters: Cindy Shellito (University of Northern Colorado), Julie Bartley (Gustavus Adolphus College), Laura Triplett (Gustavus Adolphus College)

Registration deadline: Wednesday, April 6

Summary

This webinar will provide an opportunity to hear from geoscience faculty who connect climate literacy to learning about the Earth in their courses (more information on teaching sustainability). Cindy Shellito is the author of the InTeGrate module:Climate of Change and will talk about climate literacy principals and share examples of how to teach about them in a course. Julie Bartley and Laura Triplett are leaders of the Gustavus Adolphus College InTeGrate Implementation Program that works to weave climate science across the curriculum. They will talk about how contextualizing climate literacy principals is important in this work and the role of InTeGrate materials in supporting their efforts. The webinar will include 30 minutes of presentation and 25 minutes for discussion. Participants are encouraged to both ask questions of the presenters and discuss their own experiences connecting science to issues of justice.

 

Goals:

At the end of this webinar, participants will have

  • a strategy for increasing climate literacy in their courses
  • a link between climate literacy and the focus of their course
  • greater familiarity with InTeGrate principles and resources
  • new colleagues engaged in this work

 

Logistics

Time - 12:00 pm Pacific | 1:00 pm Mountain | 2:00 pm Central | 3:00 pm Eastern
Duration - 1 hour
Format - Online web presentation via Adobe Connect web conference software with questions and discussion. To join the webinar, please visit:http://serc.adobeconnect.com/integrate/ and follow the prompts.
Registration - Please register for this workshop by Wednesday, April 6, 2016 using the registration form
Preparation - There is no advance preparation required for this webinar.

Please email Alice Newman (anewman AT carleton.edu) if you have any questions about this event.

 

Presenters

Cindy Shellito, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Northern Colorado

Julie Bartley, Geology, Gustavus Adolphus College

Laura Triplett, Geology, Gustavus Adolphus College

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