This image depicts a representative subset of the atmospheric processes related to aerosol lifecycles, cloud lifecycles, and aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions that must be understood to improve future climate predictions.

12:00 pm Pacific | 1:00 pm Mountain | 2:00 pm Central | 3:00 pm Eastern

Presenters: Cindy Shellito (University of Northern Colorado), Julie Bartley (Gustavus Adolphus College), Laura Triplett (Gustavus Adolphus College)

Registration deadline: Wednesday, April 6

Summary

This webinar will provide an opportunity to hear from geoscience faculty who connect climate literacy to learning about the Earth in their courses (more information on teaching sustainability). Cindy Shellito is the author of the InTeGrate module:Climate of Change and will talk about climate literacy principals and share examples of how to teach about them in a course. Julie Bartley and Laura Triplett are leaders of the Gustavus Adolphus College InTeGrate Implementation Program that works to weave climate science across the curriculum. They will talk about how contextualizing climate literacy principals is important in this work and the role of InTeGrate materials in supporting their efforts. The webinar will include 30 minutes of presentation and 25 minutes for discussion. Participants are encouraged to both ask questions of the presenters and discuss their own experiences connecting science to issues of justice.

 

Goals:

At the end of this webinar, participants will have

  • a strategy for increasing climate literacy in their courses
  • a link between climate literacy and the focus of their course
  • greater familiarity with InTeGrate principles and resources
  • new colleagues engaged in this work

 

Logistics

Time - 12:00 pm Pacific | 1:00 pm Mountain | 2:00 pm Central | 3:00 pm Eastern
Duration - 1 hour
Format - Online web presentation via Adobe Connect web conference software with questions and discussion. To join the webinar, please visit:http://serc.adobeconnect.com/integrate/ and follow the prompts.
Registration - Please register for this workshop by Wednesday, April 6, 2016 using the registration form
Preparation - There is no advance preparation required for this webinar.

Please email Alice Newman (anewman AT carleton.edu) if you have any questions about this event.

 

Presenters

Cindy Shellito, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Northern Colorado

Julie Bartley, Geology, Gustavus Adolphus College

Laura Triplett, Geology, Gustavus Adolphus College

NSTA continues to explore the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) by presenting a web seminar series focusing on the disciplinary core ideas. The fall series features four informative and interactive web seminars on physical science core ideas and three on Earth and space science. The series will continue in 2014 with web seminars on life science and engineering design.

The web seminar on the disciplinary core idea of Earth and Human Activity addresses questions such as “How do humans depend on Earth’s resources?” and “How do humans change the planet?”

This web seminar will provide guidance on:

  • which concepts are central to an understanding of Earth and human activity
  • how students' understanding of Earth and human activity might progress over their K-12 education; and
  • what students engaging in scientific and engineering practices to understand Earth and human activity looks like in the classroom

The National Climate Assessment, released in May of 2014, summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, touching on many disciplines: earth science, biology, human health, engineering, technology, economics, and policy. Explore the document with lead NCA author, Sarah Trainor, then learn about related educator resources with Jessica Brunacini from the PoLAR Partnership.

Discover how to bring these resources into classroom lessons, engage students in data collection and analysis, share visualizations and citizen science projects. 

Focus this month will be on the Alaska region. Watch for additional regions to be featured in upcoming “Ask US” sessions.

Also explore the NCA Education Resources for the Alaska Region to help to unpack the key messages of the region and point to related, high-quality online resources.

Spring webinar series continues on Monday, April 25th at 3pm EDT (12pm PDT) 

Presented by: Ariana Sutton-Grier, NOAA National Ocean Service & lead for NOAA's Coastal Blue Carbon Team 

There is growing interest nationally and internationally in leveraging the carbon benefits (termed “blue carbon”) of coastal habitats in climate and coastal resilience policies.  Coastal wetlands (specifically mangroves, salt marshes, and seagrass meadows) have unique characteristics that make them incredibly efficient, natural carbon sinks with most carbon stored below ground in soils.  Protecting and restoring these ecosystems around the globe will help maintain all the societal benefits these ecosystems provide including the natural climate mitigation benefits, but also the food security, water quality, and storm protection benefits that enhance coastal communities and economies.
 
This presentation will discuss the state of the science and policy of blue carbon including: (1) incorporation of coastal wetland carbon in U.S. national climate, resilience, and conservation efforts; (2) potential steps to incorporate coastal wetlands in national greenhouse gas inventories as suggested by the 2013 International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Wetlands Supplement; and opportunities to include coastal wetlands in voluntary carbon markets.  The presentation will conclude by highlighting some of the most pressing blue carbon scientific gaps that need to be filled in order to support these developing policies.  
On behalf of the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program
 

Following the presentation there will be a few short informational announcements relevant to the ocean acidification communication community. Please forward this invitation to interested colleagues. We look forward to seeing you at this event!

More info on the series and upcoming webinars can be found here

 

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) brings considerably more attention to climate and climate change than earlier curriculum standards. The session will explore what and how to teach climate in ways connected to NGSS's three dimensions: (science and engineering practices, cross-cutting themes, and disciplinary core ideas (DCIs)), especially the most connected DCI: Human Impacts. We welcome abstracts addressing innovative roles for scientists assisting educators, student engagement with real data, materials and approaches that attend to the climate-energy connection; exemplary curricular materials, successful out-of-school programs, and strategies for dealing with anti-science sentiments.

The live streams will begin 15 minutes before the session times. View the full program. Note: All times are in PST.

NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project (CSEP) is collaborating with Federal, State and NGO partners to convene four climate-science workshops for formal and informal educators. Participants will hear from and interact with climate science, education and communication experts, and visit research facilities to explore foundational technologies and innovations in Earth-system research. This workshop in Silver Spring, Maryland will focus on the region and topical impacts of climate change, with a goal of connecting educators and their students/audiences to the best-available, science-based information and resources about climate change.

Register for the Silver Spring, Maryland workshop is open, however there are attendance limits for the workshop, and we are advertising them nationally.  Availability will be on a first come first serve basis, so register early for your workshop. Participation in the workshops is free, but attendees are responsible for arranging their own transportation, lodging and meals unless otherwise indicated in workshop details.  

All attendees will receive a certificate acknowledging their participation in the workshop as well as the number of professional development hours they have engaged in.  

Below are the location, date, location, and attendance limits for the upcoming workshop. Registration forms will be shut down when registration for that workshop has reached capacity. You will receive an email confirming your participation in the workshop. Attendance limits for the workshop is 100 educators.

Important Note: If you are a foreign national and wish to attend the workshops in Silver Spring, MD you MUST send an email to Peg Steffen, Peg.Steffen@noaa.gov

 

Climate Education Workshop: Detailed Information

Silver Spring, Maryland

Dates & Times: 

Wednesday, August 5th, 2015 8:00 am-4:30pm

 

Place: 

NOAA Science Center

1305 East West Highway

Silver Spring, MD 20910 

 

Important Note:

If you are a foreign national and wish to attend this workshop, you MUST note it in your registration and send an email to: Peg Steffen, Peg.Steffen@noaa.gov

 

Primary Contacts:  

Peg Steffen, Peg.Steffen@noaa.gov

Bruce Moravchik, Bruce.moravchik@noaa.gov

 

Featured Presentations:

  • An introduction to global climate models, including a user friendly version that can be run on a desktop computer, allowing students to explore the subject of climate change in the same way that research scientists do. 
  • Simulations and Activities for Modeling planetary energy balance, tree rings, paleoclimates, the greenhouse effect, climate sensitivity and future climate projection.
  • Climate change poses some formidable communication and education challenges, as well as opportunities.  Simulation-based role-playing games offer a growing opportunity to provide powerful educational experiences.

 

Featured Activities:

  • Hands-On with NOAA’s Science on a Sphere, and new flat screen app!
  • Explore the drivers for change in sea level in a new app that includes a question-driven tour and an exploration of data that scientists collect.
  • Hands-On Activities and Simple Computer-based Simulations for Climate Modeling Education
  • SMARTIC role playing simulation for Polar regions based on the U.S. Navy Fleet Arctic Operation Game.
  • Carbon Journeys simulation for students and a new Risk Reduction Simulation for coastal hazards that encourages thinking about uncertainty.  
  • Design your own transition to a low-carbon global economy with the En-ROADS simulation

 

Notes on Food & Lodging:

  • There is no cost to attend this workshop.
  • Participants must make their own travel and overnight arrangements.
  • Meals will not be provided, but participants will be informed of the numerous and inexpensive dining options in walking distance.

 

For questions concerning the workshop including location and program questions, contact the workshop lead:

Silver Spring, MD - peg.steffen@noaa.gov 

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This workshop is part of the White House Climate Education and Literacy Initiative

One, 60-minute virtual session - Thursday, April 21
12:00 pm Pacific | 1:00 pm Mountain | 2:00 pm Central | 3:00 pm Eastern

This webinar will demonstrate how soils can be used to broaden students' understanding of the Earth system and human impacts on this system. Kathryn Baldwin is the author of the InTeGrate module Soils, Systems, and Society. Hannah Scherer and Martha Murphy are authors of the InTeGrate module A Growing Concern: Sustaining Soil Resources through Local Decision Making. Drawing from these two InTeGrate modules, the presenters will discuss how soils, soil health and soil sustainability provide unique opportunities for engaging students and developing their systems thinking. Examples from the modules show how local data can be used to elucidate abstract concepts and how systems thinking can be applied to real problems. The webinar will include 30 minutes of presentation and 25 minutes for discussion. Participants are encouraged to both ask questions of the presenters and discuss their own experiences of teaching about soils in the context of Earth systems.

For more information on the series and to learn more about InTeGrate visit:http://serc.carleton.edu/integrate/workshops/index.html

 

During this web seminar for educators of students in grades 7-12 participants will learn how to incorporate weather data from NASA’s Earth Observing Satellites into meteorology lessons while addressing national science and technology standards, including the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Educators will explore the benefits of monitoring the climate system with satellites and review how satellites observe key atmospheric elements and features that are important for studying long-term climate trends. Participants will explore the contributions that satellites make to improve our understanding, monitoring, and prediction of climate. The web seminar will also cover the challenges involved in monitoring climate with satellites. Register today!

In the featured activity students use data from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). GOES provides real-time weather data for use in short-term weather forecasting, space environment monitoring, and research and development. POES primarily provides data for long-range weather forecasting, ensuring that non-visible data, for any region of Earth, are no more than six hours old.

Next Generation Science Standards addressed in this web seminar:

  • MS-ESS2 Earth's Systems

    • Science and Engineering Practices

      • Planning and Carrying Out Investigations
    • Disciplinary Core Ideas
    • The Roles of Water in Earth's Surface Processes
    • Weather and Climate
    • Crosscutting Concepts

      • Cause and Effect

Common Core Mathematics Standards addressed in this web seminar:

  • Grade 8

    • Statistics and Probability

NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project (CSEP) is collaborating with Federal, State and NGO partners to convene four climate-science workshops for formal and informal educators. Participants will hear from and interact with climate science, education and communication experts, and visit research facilities to explore foundational technologies and innovations in Earth-system research. This workshop in Boulder, CO will focus on the region and topical impacts of climate change, with a goal of connecting educators and their students/audiences to the best-available, science-based information and resources about climate change.

Register for the Boulder, CO workshop is open, however there are attendance limits for the workshop, and we are advertising them nationally.  Availability will be on a first come first serve basis, so register early for your workshop. Participation in the workshops is free, but attendees are responsible for arranging their own transportation, lodging and meals unless otherwise indicated in workshop details.  

All attendees will receive a certificate acknowledging their participation in the workshop as well as the number of professional development hours they have engaged in.  

Below are the location, dates, locations, and attendance limits for the upcoming workshop. Registration forms will be shut down when registration for that workshop has reached capacity. You will receive an email confirming your participation in the workshop.  The capacity for this workshop is 30 Participants.

Important Note: If you are a foreign national and wish to attend the workshops in Boulder, CO you MUST send an email to the lead contact for that workshop: Teresa Eastburn, eastburn@ucar.edu

 

Climate Education Workshop: Detailed Information

Boulder, Colorado

Dates & Times: Thursday through Saturday, June 25th-27th, 2015. Thu/Fri 8:00am-6:00pm, Sat 8:00am-3:30pm

 

Place: National Center for Atmospheric Research /University Center for Atmospheric Research Mesa Laboratory

1850 Table Mesa Drive.

Boulder, Colorado 80305

303.497.1000 

 

Important Note: If you are a foreign national and wish to attend this workshop, you MUST note it in your registration and send an email to: Teresa Eastburn, eastburn@ucar.edu

 

Primary Contacts:  

Teresa Eastburn, eastburn@ucar.edu

Bruce Moravchik, Bruce.moravchik@noaa.gov

Peg Steffen, Peg.Steffen@noaa.gov

 

Featured Presentations:

  • The Landscape of Climate change and its Impacts: A Global to Local Perspective.
  • Meet the Scientists - 1:1 Rotating Small Group Conversations with Climate Scientists 
  • NOAA’s Science on a Sphere - Visualizing the impacts of Climate Change Globally and Locally
  • Water and the West: Regional Impacts of Climate Change and Citizen Science Monitoring Programs.
  • A Strategy to Decarbonize US Energy: What Needs to Be Done and How Teachers, Students,  and Communities Can Mitigate and Adapt to the Impacts of Climate Change.

 

Featured Activities:

  • Tour and Presentations at

    • U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Lab.
    • U.S. Geological Survey Ice Core Lab. Participants should bring a winter coat, hat, and gloves in order to experience the ice core storage freezer within the facility.
    • NCAR Wyoming Super-Computing Center 

 

  • Hands-On Activity Demonstrations:

    • The Energy Wedge Game
    • Glaciers A Go-Go & Glaciers Now and Then
    • The Systems Game
    • The Very Simple Climate Model & other Climate Simulations for the Classroom.

 

Notes on Food & Lodging:

  • There is no cost to attend this workshop.
  • Participants must make their own travel and overnight arrangements.
  • Meals will not be provided, but participants will be informed of the numerous dining options.
  • A limited block of rooms have been reserved below the Federal Government Rate ($111/night excluding taxes) at the Days Inn, Boulder. 5397 South Boulder Road, Hwy36 Table Mesa Exit, Boulder, CO 80303 (http://www.daysinn.com/hotels/colorado/boulder/days-hotel-boulder/hotel-overview, http://www.dayshotelboulder.com/). To reserve a room at this rate call Days Inn at 303.499.4422 by Friday, May 22 and identify yourself as booking a room as part of the “NCAR/UCAR/NOAA Group” No rooms will be held at this rate past this date. 
  • A series of shuttles organized by the workshop will be available for limited transportation to/from this hotel and the NCAR/UCAR facility and downtown locations at the beginning and end of each workshop day.  

For questions concerning the workshop including location and program questions, contact the workshop lead:

Boulder, CO  - Teresa Eastburn, eastburn@ucar.edu

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This workshop is part of the White House Climate Education and Literacy Initiative

 

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