This short, engaging video created by NASA presents a complex topic via a simple analogy. The idea of positive and negative feedback is demonstrated by Daisyworld - a world with black and white flowers growing on it.

This video shows where and how ice cores are extracted from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), cut, packaged, flown to the ice core storage facility in Denver, further sliced into samples, and shipped to labs all over the world where scientists use them to study indicators of climate change from the past.

An activity focusing on black carbon. This activity explores the impacts of the use of wood, dung, and charcoal for fuel, all which generate black carbon, in developing countries.

This interactive contains four animated slides that introduce the greenhouse effect. An additional animation offers to 'explore more'.

Two simple experiments/demonstrations show the role of plants in mitigating the acidification caused when CO2 is dissolved in water.

Students investigate how much greenhouse gas (carbon dioxide and methane) their family releases into the atmosphere each year and relate it to climate change. To address this, students use the Environmental Protection Agency Personal Emissions Calculator to estimate their family's greenhouse gas emissions and to think about how their family could reduce those emissions.

This Motions of the Sun Lab is an interactive applet from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Astronomy Applet project.

In this role-playing activity, learners are presented with a scenario in which they determine whether the Gulf Stream is responsible for keeping northern Europe warm. They must also address the potential future of the Gulf Stream if polar ice were to continue melting. The students work in small groups to identify the issue, discuss the problem, and develop a problem statement. They are then asked what they need to know to solve the problem.

Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

The energy we use to heat and light our homes, drive to work and school and watch our favorite television show can come from a variety of traditional and renewable energy sources -- crude oil, natural gas, wind farms, hydroelectric power and coal-fired power plants. But how do we understand the costs and benefits of the energy choices we make? What happens if the mix of energy sources changes in the future? What does this all mean for our climate, air, water, and overall environmental quality? Learn about the scientific tools EPA scientists are developing to help states, communities and Tribes make decisions about energy use now and in the future. Explore an interactive board game developed by EPA scientists called Generate! that explores energy choices and the environment and gets students “energized” in some friendly competition.


Target audience: K-12 teachers
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenter: Dr. Rebecca Dodder

September 3, 2015 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM EDT

As part of the climate change goal, DOE is planning to host eight Regional Climate Change Impact Webinars as part of the MIE initiative. We are looking to host speakers who will discuss regional efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change impacts as they relate to the President's Climate Action Plan with a particular focus on engaging minority communities. 

Experts will provide findings from the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER), energy job strategies, and the National Climate Impact Assessment. As part of the QER discussion, we plan to share climate-based findings related to national security, resilience, the grid of the future, environment, grid siting, and shared transport. This discussion will outline federal energy policy objectives, proposals, and actions, particularly as they relate to climate change and resilience for underserved communities. For more information on the QER, please visit 

An expert on energy and climate change job strategies will discuss job opportunities by region as well as regional options for renewables and energy efficiency. We will share region-specific information about the energy workforce across a variety of energy sectors and experience levels. 

The final section of the webinar will focus on findings from the National Climate Assessment and their regional applicability to those communities who are disproportionally impacted by the effects of climate change. We hope to host regional experts who can share Assessment findings and provide potential tools for resilience among minority and tribal communities.