This audio slideshow/video describes the Greenland ice sheet and the difficulties in getting scientific measurements at the interface between the ice and the ocean. It features the work of a researcher from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute researcher. She gives a personal account of her work on the recent increase in melting of glaciers, the challenges of working in Greenland, and the reasons why so many climate scientists are looking there for answers to questions about climate change.

In this interactive, regionally-relevant carbon cycle game, students are challenged to understand the role of carbon in global climate change. They imagine that they are carbon molecules and travel via different processes through carbon reservoirs on the Colorado Plateau (the Four Corners area of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah). This game can be adapted to other regions.

Students use Google Earth to analyze oil consumption per capita in the US and around the world. Students then use spreadsheets to create graphs and calculate statistics regarding per capita energy use among various categories.

In this activity, students make a model sea floor sediment core using two types of buttons to represent fossil diatoms. They then compare the numbers of diatom fossils in the sediment at different depths to determine whether the seas were free of ice while the diatoms were alive.

This interactive visualization is a suite of weather and climate datasets as well as tools with which to manipulate and display them visually.

The Climate Momentum Simulation allows users to quickly compare the resulting sea level rise, temperature change, atmospheric CO2, and global CO2 emissions from six different policy options: 1) Business As Usual, 2) March 2009 Country Proposals, 3) Flatten CO2 emissions by 2025, 4) 29% below 2009 levels by 2040, 5) 80% reduction of global fossil fuel plus a 90% reduction in land use emissions by 2050, and 6) 95 reduction of CO2 emissions by 2020). Based on the more complex C-ROADS simulator.

In this activity students explore recent changes in the Arctic's climate that have been observed and documented by indigenous Arctic residents. Students watch a video, take notes, and create a concept map. Students also examine and graph historical weather data and indigenous data for an Arctic community. Students explain why natives are critical observers.

This interactive provides two scenarios for students to look at issues related to energy and climate change: from the perspective of either a family, or a monarch.

Plan to join us for a day of learning and sharing about climate change and climate change education. What do we know about how people learn about climate change? Learn about the most effective strategies to help others make informed decisions. Hear from experts about the outlook for the D.C. region. Discover resources that exist in our community that could help your program or project.

To apply: Please complete an application before February 13th, 2013

More information about CUSP can be found here.

The Climate Leader is an online training in systems thinking to help fuel the global response to climate change. These materials will help you to be more effective at addressing climate change by enabling you to see the interconnections and big picture in your work.

Climate Interactive launched The Climate Leader, a free five-week online training series in systems thinking designed for people working to address climate change. Sign up now at:

This online course will share some time-tested insights into navigating the complex world of taking action on climate. Included will be video lessons offering some practical and proven approaches for leading in complexity, being strategic, and drawing on both your own rational brilliance and your own deep intuitive instincts through systems thinking.
Join more than 2,000 other Climate Leaders for this training:
When you sign up, you will begin receiving the series of lessons via email. There will also be opportunities to participate in exercises to deepen your understanding and connect with others participating in the course.
Behind the Climate Leader are decades of experience from the team at Climate Interactive and powerful ideas developed at MIT. Their cutting edge tools have been helping people see what works to respond to climate change. They’ve helped students, business leaders, activists, and UN negotiators determine the choices that will put us on a pathway to a healthy climate. Lessons will be led by Dr. Elizabeth Sawin and Drew Jones, co-directors of Climate Interactive, who will share their wealth of insights on systems thinking with you.
The Climate Leader goal is to help you be as intentional as possible, as bold as possible, and as visionary and clear as you can be. Through the eleven lessons, this course will help you answer questions like:
  • How can I best look at the big picture, and why is that so useful?
  • How do I identify places that will have the most impact?
  • How can my efforts best be amplified?
  • What are the root causes of the challenge I’m facing?


The course is free and you can sign up to begin at anytime. In return for what Climate Leader provides, they invite you to use what you can to make a difference, share what you like, and give us feedback.