This interactive world map shows the impact of a global temperature rise of 4 degrees Celsius on a variety of factors including agriculture, marine life, fires, weather patterns, and health. Hot Spots can be clicked on to get more specific information about the problems in different regions.

The Climate Leader is an online training in systems thinking to help fuel the global response to climate change. These materials will help you to be more effective at addressing climate change by enabling you to see the interconnections and big picture in your work.

Climate Interactive launched The Climate Leader, a free five-week online training series in systems thinking designed for people working to address climate change. Sign up now at: http://climateinteractive.org/the-climate-leader/

This online course will share some time-tested insights into navigating the complex world of taking action on climate. Included will be video lessons offering some practical and proven approaches for leading in complexity, being strategic, and drawing on both your own rational brilliance and your own deep intuitive instincts through systems thinking.
 
Join more than 2,000 other Climate Leaders for this training: http://climateinteractive.org/the-climate-leader/
 
When you sign up, you will begin receiving the series of lessons via email. There will also be opportunities to participate in exercises to deepen your understanding and connect with others participating in the course.
 
Behind the Climate Leader are decades of experience from the team at Climate Interactive and powerful ideas developed at MIT. Their cutting edge tools have been helping people see what works to respond to climate change. They’ve helped students, business leaders, activists, and UN negotiators determine the choices that will put us on a pathway to a healthy climate. Lessons will be led by Dr. Elizabeth Sawin and Drew Jones, co-directors of Climate Interactive, who will share their wealth of insights on systems thinking with you.
 
The Climate Leader goal is to help you be as intentional as possible, as bold as possible, and as visionary and clear as you can be. Through the eleven lessons, this course will help you answer questions like:
  • How can I best look at the big picture, and why is that so useful?
  • How do I identify places that will have the most impact?
  • How can my efforts best be amplified?
  • What are the root causes of the challenge I’m facing?

 

The course is free and you can sign up to begin at anytime. In return for what Climate Leader provides, they invite you to use what you can to make a difference, share what you like, and give us feedback.

May 29th, 2014 12:00 to 1:00 PM ET

Climate change in the Great Lakes region and beyond is expected to promote shifts in the ranges and phenology of well-known plant and animal species. These shifts are often a result of changes in the availability of food and shelter, as well as temperature. Knowing more about these potential impacts will help wildlife managers and nature enthusiasts alike to adapt to and potentially mitigate some of the resulting changes in wildlife diversity.

This webinar will cover:

  • an overview of potential climate change impacts on wildlife
  • effects of a changing climate on the phenology of migratory birds
  • impacts of shifting climate conditions (such as drought and flooding) on the vulnerability of species of special concern
  • climate change effects on Broad-tailed Hummingbirds as a result of shifts in the timing of flowering of their nectar flowers glacier lily, dwarf larkspur, and Indian paintbrush, which they rely on during spring migration

The webinar is free. To register click here. Once registered, you will receive a confirmation email with log-in information.

 

Agenda

Welcome and Introduction: Jill Jentes Banicki, Ohio Sea Grant

Assessing the Vulnerability of Wildlife to Climate Change: Benjamin Zuckerberg, Dept of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, UW-Madison

Climate Change Effects on Broad-tailed Hummingbirds: Amy Iler, Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Maryland and The Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory

Question/Answer and Wrap Up

Discussion: Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions via a live chat after the presentation.

 

Visit changingclimate.osu.edu to view previous webinars and other climate resources.

NSTA continues to explore the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) by presenting a web seminar series focusing on the disciplinary core ideas. The fall series features four informative and interactive web seminars on physical science core ideas and three on Earth and space science. The series will continue in 2014 with web seminars on life science and engineering design.

The web seminar on the disciplinary core idea of Earth and Human Activity addresses questions such as “How do humans depend on Earth’s resources?” and “How do humans change the planet?”

This web seminar will provide guidance on:

  • which concepts are central to an understanding of Earth and human activity
  • how students' understanding of Earth and human activity might progress over their K-12 education; and
  • what students engaging in scientific and engineering practices to understand Earth and human activity looks like in the classroom

Wednesday, March 23: 10:00 am Pacific | 11:00 am Mountain | 12:00 pm Central | 1:00 pm Eastern

This webinar will provide an opportunity to hear from geoscience faculty who connect the use of data and earth modeling to learning about the Earth in their courses. Becca Walker and Beth Pratt-Sitaula are the author and editor (respectively) of Ice Mass and Sea Level Changes, a UNAVCO-developed, geodesy-focused GETSI module that uses authentic geodetic data to introduce students to the scientific and societal aspects of sea level change. Kirsten Menking is the author of the InTeGrate module: Earth Modeling(coming live in the Fall) that develops students' qualitative and quantitative tools for constructing, experimenting with, and interpreting dynamic models of different components of the Earth system. The webinar will include presentations on specific teaching strategies/tools and will provide opportunities for discussion. Participants are encouraged to both ask questions of the presenters and discuss their own experiences of using data to teach about societally important issues.

For more information on the series and to learn more about InTeGrate visit: http://serc.carleton.edu/integrate/workshops/index.htm

Join them for this self-paced online course (Massive Open Online Course, MOOC).  The course will run over 4.5 weeks requiring a total of 20-25 hours to complete, start date is April 1, 2015.

Why is water at the heart of so much conflict in the American West? How have major cities and extensive agricultural systems been able to thrive in the Western United States despite most of the region being either a desert or semi-desert environment? How will a warming climate affect the availability and use of water in a region populated by tens of millions of people?

Join us in exploring these and other questions as we combine an overview of the science behind water and climate in the Western US with a survey of the major legal, political, and cultural issues focused on this precious resource.

You will hear from over 15 experts in water management, policy, and research in the West. We will start with history, politics and culture of water development in the Western US (module 1) and hydrology, water demand and climate in the Western US (module 2) before we dive into a case study around the Colorado River Basin (module 3) and explore controversial water issues (module 4).

This course will include many resources for educators. Educators can earn professional development credit by signing up for an parallel two credit hours course at the cost of $140.

This course is free and open to the public.  Register now!

 

Anne Gold, Associate Scientist and Science Educator, CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

Eric Gordon, Managing Director of Western Water Assessment, CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

Join NSTA for this web seminar on July 10 and learn how the Learning Center—NSTA's e-PD portal with over 11,600 resources, a community of like-minded individuals, and professional learning tools—can help you enhance and extend your content and pedagogical knowledge of Earth and Space Science science topics.Register today!

 

This program is designed for educators of grades K-12. The seminar's discussion will focus on resources related to the topics of Earth, Sun, and Moon and the The Solar System. An archive and related PowerPoint presentation will be available at the end of the program.

Details

Title: Enhance Your Content and Pedagogical Knowledge Using NSTA Resources: Earth and Space Science
Target audience: K - 12 teachers
Date: Thursday, July 10, 2014
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenter: Don Boonstra

This webinar is underwritten by the GE Foundation.  NOAA is a Content Collaborator of NSTA's Learning Center



 

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) brings considerably more attention to climate and climate change than earlier curriculum standards. The session will explore what and how to teach climate in ways connected to NGSS's three dimensions: (science and engineering practices, cross-cutting themes, and disciplinary core ideas (DCIs)), especially the most connected DCI: Human Impacts. We welcome abstracts addressing innovative roles for scientists assisting educators, student engagement with real data, materials and approaches that attend to the climate-energy connection; exemplary curricular materials, successful out-of-school programs, and strategies for dealing with anti-science sentiments.

The live streams will begin 15 minutes before the session times. View the full program. Note: All times are in PST.

Dates & Times: Fri and Sat, April 22nd and 23rd, 2016. 8:30 am - 5:00 pm pst

NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project (CSEP) is collaborating with Federal, State and NGO partners to convene four climate-science workshops for formal and informal educators. Participants will hear from and interact with climate science, education and communication experts, and visit research facilities to explore foundational technologies and innovations in Earth-system research. This workshop in Long Beach, California will focus on the region and topical impacts of climate change, with a goal of connecting educators and their students/audiences to the best-available, science-based information and resources about climate change.

Registration for the Long Beach, California workshop is open, however there are attendance limits for the workshop, and we are advertising them nationally.  Availability will be on a first come first serve basis, so register early for your workshop. Participation in the workshops is free, but attendees are responsible for arranging their own transportation, lodging and meals unless otherwise indicated in workshop details.  

Place:

Aquarium of the Pacific

100 Aquarium Way

Long Beach, CA 90807

Primary Contacts:  

Alie LeBeau (alebeau@lbaop.org)

Gabrielle Dorr (gabrielle.dorr@noaa.gov)

Molly Harrison (Molly.Harrison@noaa.gov)

Featured Presentations

  • Climate 101

  • Sea Level Rise

  • El Nino Data and impacts on Fisheries

  • Introduction to Colorado Lagoon

Featured Activities

  • Exploration of Science on a Sphere

  • Hands-on activities from USC SeaGrant

  • Field Trip to Colorado Lagoon:

  • Water quality testing

  • Beach seining

  • Restoration planting

Notes - Workshop Costs, Food & Lodging:

  • This workshop has a capacity for 25 participants.

  • There is no cost to attend this workshop. Participants will receive a ($50-$100) stipend for participation in both days,

  • Participants must make their own travel and overnight arrangements.

  • A nearby lodging option is Hyatt Regency Long Beach at 200 S. Pine St. (562) 491-1234

  • There will be a field trip to a local wetland area as part to this workshop on Saturday April 23. Participants will be responsible for their own transportation from the Aquarium of the Pacific to the field trip site.

  • Coffee and lunch will be provided on both workshop days.

Wednesday, February 18th – 4:00pm PT/7:00pm ET

The National Climate Assessment, released in May of 2014, summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, touching on many disciplines: earth science, biology, human health, engineering, technology, economics, and policy. Explore the document with a lead NCA author, then learn about related educator resources with Minda Berbeco from the National Center for Science Education. Discover how to bring these resources into classroom lessons, engage students in data collection and analysis, share visualizations and citizen science projects. 

Focus this month will be on the Southwest region. Watch for additional regions to be featured in upcoming “Ask US” sessions.

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