This month's webinar will build on the theme of Earth's Energy Budget with an investigation into clouds and their role in Earth's climate system. Participants will learn about resources from the Students' Cloud Observations On-Line, or S'COOL, program that allows students to practice cloud identification and submit observations to NASA as citizen scientists. Participants will also take a closer look at posters and interactive features created using data from the CERES instrument that is aboard a variety of NASA satellites.

Certificates of professional development hours are available upon request. Additional session dates will be announced soon.

Webinar 2: Tuesday, October 21 – 6:30 pm EST / 3:30 PST/ 12:30 HST (90 min)

Join us for the second of two webinars for an introduction to our newest NOAA Data in the Classroom curriculum module – Investigating Coral Bleaching Using Real Data. You'll hear from NOAA experts about coral bleaching and how scientists use remote sensing tools to study stresses on coral health. The NODE curriculum developers will introduce the new lesson plans and demonstrate how our unique scaffolding can help students develop skills to access and use online data.

The NOAA Data in the Classroom Project develops curriculum designed to help teachers and students use real scientific data to explore dynamic Earth processes and understand the impact of environmental events on a regional or global scale. Each curriculum module features easy-to-use curriculum materials and specially designed websites that enable students to access and use real data. Our newest curriculum module – Investigating Coral Bleaching Using Real Data – is being developed for grades 6-8.

  • Guided walk-thru of curriculum lesson plans
  • Building students' capabilities using real data
  • Using NGSS, Disciplinary Core Ideas, and Cross Cutting Concepts
  • Climate Literacy and Coral Bleaching

Join Second Nature and the Security & Sustainability Forum for a webinar on the role of higher education in creating a sustained national climate assessment.  The National Climate Assessment Development and Advisory Committee (NCADAC) delivered a Special Report on Preparing the Nation for Change: Building a Sustained National Climate  Assessment Process to the FederalGovernment this year.  The report provides Federal managers  with advice and recommendations toward the development of an ongoing, sustained national assessment of global change impacts and adaptation and mitigation strategies for the nation.  A panel of primary authors of this report will summarize the report's findings and recommendations. 


  • Moderator: James Buizer 
  • Overview of the Sustained National Climate Assessment: Sharon Hays 
  • Collaborative partnerships that sustain assessment activities: Amy Luers 
  • The scientific foundations of a Sustained Assessment toward managing the risks and opportunities of climate change: Richard Moss 
  • The role of higher education in a Sustained National Climate Assessment: Anne Waple

Monday, April 7, 2014 at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

Frank Niepold, NOAA Climate Program Office's Education coordinator, will discuss developing student’s 21st century skills by incorporating digitally available activities, videos, and visualizations into the classroom. The rigorously reviewed digital educational resources developed by the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) and syndicated through NOAA’s web site will be examined. A focal point will be how to teach a climate and energy learning progression across elementary through high school grades taking into account contact time and coherence matter constraints.

This course explores the science of climate change. Students will learn how the climate system works; what factors cause climate to change across different time scales and how those factors interact; how climate has changed in the past; how scientists use models, observations and theory to make predictions about future climate; and the possible consequences of climate change for our planet. The course explores evidence for changes in ocean temperature, sea level and acidity due to global warming. Students will learn how climate change today is different from past climate cycles and how satellites and other technologies are revealing the global signals of a changing climate. Finally, the course looks at the connection between human activity and the current warming trend and considers some of the potential social, economic and environmental consequences of climate change.


Authoring Scientists

Ed Mathez, Geologist

Gavin Schmidt, Climatologist
Drew Shindell, Climatologist


Key Science Concepts

The Sun is the primary source of energy for Earth's climate system. The Earth's energy is in balance, or equilibrium, when Earth emits the same amount of energy as it absorbs.

The climate system is dynamic and has many interrelated components. A change in any one component can influence the equilibrium of the system and result in climate changes.

Climate varies over space and time through both natural and human sources. These forces operate over time periods ranging from years to hundreds of millions or even billions of years and vary widely with location on Earth.

Human activities – particularly the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide since the Industrial Revolution – are affecting the climate system today, leading to warming temperatures globally.

Evidence for variations in past climates is held in ocean and lake sediments, ice cores, corals, tree rings, and other geologic records. Understanding past climate informs us about how the present climate system works and how it might change in the future.

Climate change will have consequences for the Earth system including human society. Climate change research involves extensive observations, theory and modeling. Future climate change scenarios are essential to informing efforts to mitigate and to adapt to the consequences of climate change.

Graduate Credit

This course is approved for graduate credit and continuing education units from leading institutions at an additional cost.



The second in the four-part webinar series takes place on November 13 at 4.30 MT, 5.30 CT, 6.30 ET and 3.30 PT . The webinar will involve three hydrologists from the US Geological Survey:  Dr. Jeff Writer,Dr. Brian Ebel and Sheila Murphy.

Jeff specializes in wildfire impacts on water quality and aquatic ecosystems, coupling of ecological and engineered infrastructure, fate and transport of emerging contaminants. Brian specializes in unsaturated flow and soil physics, surface water/groundwater interaction, hillslope hydrology and runoff generation, landslide and debris flow initiation, and post-wildfire hydrology. Sheila’s research focuses on the characterization of the hydrology and water chemistry of small watersheds and how they are affected by both natural factors and disturbance.

The webinar will be streaming video from the CU Boulder campus, and will take questions from the live chat. 

April 17, 2014, at 4 p.m. EDT

From proxy data to direct observations, all signs point to the same conclusion: Earth's climate system is warming at an unprecedented rate. Join presenter Margaret Mooney from the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies to learn more about how scientists measure and document warming trends along with tools to teach this topic to your students.

Certificates of professional development hours are available upon request. Additional session dates will be announced soon.

"Ask NICE" Online Professional Development Series

Join the NASA Innovations in Climate Education, or NICE, team for the final webinar of the 2013-14 school year in their series of Google Plus Hangout professional development sessions. Extended workshops will be held over the summer with those who have participated in the series. A new series of online Ask NICE sessions will begin in the fall.

For more information, visit or Questions about this series should be sent to Bonnie Murray at

6-7:00pm ET/3-4:00pm PT

The GLOBE Program  originally developed posters and activities for teachers to help students explore the concepts of Earth as a system, find patterns and connections between and among maps containing different environmental data, and to understand the relationship between time and space in regard to global environmental data.

In 2014, a digital GLOBE Earth system ePoster is now provided by the MY NASA DATA project to extend the opportunities for learning. This digital poster provides data for 2005 through 2013 and enables interactive exploration of the data in more detail through the use of animations. The animations can be used with students to find patterns among different environmental data, understand the relationship among different environmental parameters, and understand how the data changes seasonally and over longer time scales.

In this interactive educator webinar, Tina Harte, education specialist at NASA Langley Research Center and former middle school science teacher, will explore the ePoster and activities will be discussed for K-12 students, with a focus on those meeting NGSS performance expectations, science practices and cross-cutting concepts related to Earth System Science.

NSTA continues to explore the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) by presenting a web seminar series focusing on the disciplinary core ideas. The fall series features four informative and interactive web seminars on physical science core ideas and three on Earth and space science. The series will continue in 2014 with web seminars on life science and engineering design.

The web seminar on the disciplinary core idea of Earth’s Systems addresses questions such as “What regulates weather and climate?” and “What causes earthquakes and volcanoes?”

This web seminar will provide guidance on:

  • why it's important for students to understand Earth's systems
  • how students' understanding of Earth's systems might progress over their K-12 education
  • how ideas that students have about Earth's systems can be leveraged during instruction; and
  • how to incorporate the scientific and engineering practices into instruction so students can deepen their understanding of Earth's systems

The International Academy of the Digital Arts & Sciences has chosen NOAA as one of five nominees for the annual Webby Awards for online excellence. We’re nominated in both the 'Government' and 'Green' categories. If you're a fan of our site, please consider voting for us in those categories.

Voting is open from now until April 24. You do have to register/login, but you can use your Facebook, Google, or Twitter logins, or an email address with no additional personal info.

Vote for in the Government category.

Vote for the "Teaching Climate" section in the Green category.

The Webby Awards is the Internet's most respected symbol of success (much like a Grammy or an Oscar), so it's an honor just to be nominated. Out of the millions of sites, videos, ads, and mobile apps in existence, and the tens of thousands that were submitted for consideration, only a handful of Nominees were selected by the Academy for The 18th Annual Webby Awards. 

If you are a regular visitor to the Teaching Climate section of NOAA, you are most likely familiar with our reviewed resources, videos, and professional development events. But those are just some of the features that NOAA has to offer.

Across our website's four main sections, we promote public understanding of climate science and climate-related events, to make our data products and services easy to access and use, to provide climate-related support to the private sector and the Nation’s economy, and to serve people making climate-related decisions with tools and resources that help them answer specific questions.

NOAA is a team effort.  It would not be possible to produce and publish the site without contributions from more than a dozen personnel from across NOAA and from among our valued partners. And, most especially, our nomination wouldn't have been possible without the work of NOAA's and its partners' world-class climate science research, data products, and services that are routinely featured in the site.  

We would greatly appreciate your support, and hope you keep visiting us! 

Vote for NOAA in the Government category.

Vote for NOAA's "Teaching Climate" section in the Green category.