Drought has gripped many islands across the Pacific thanks to El Niño and a lack of rainfall. 

Huge waves can mean only one thing in Hawai'i: surf's up. Should surfers thank El Niño?

The dismal rainy season in southern Africa has destroyed crops, killed livestock, and even led to blackouts. El Niño probably had something to do with it. 

Rains arrived in California during January 2016, but the drought remains.

Torrential rains, flash floods and mudslides in southern California were the result of the itinerate journey of an upper-level low pressure system.

While the Atlantic hurricane season has been generally below-average, that doesn't mean it can't have a rare event.

The eastern Pacific hurricane season has gotten off to a quick start. How quick? Read on to find out.

Weather in the Southeast this fall and winter is keeping up with the dry part of the typical La Niña pattern. Precipitation across most of the Southeast was "below" or "much below" normal for October-December.

The early wet season of 2010 was typical of La Niña, with rainfall in December 2010 between 200 and 400 percent above normal in much of Queensland, according to the Australian Bureau of Meteorology.

In early June 2010, NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center reported that the ocean and atmosphere conditions across the Pacific were favorable for the development of a La Niña episode.