Includes the process of science and common misconceptions about climate science

Thad Allen and Jane Lubchenco release two rehabilitated sea turtles back into the Gulf of Mexico from a small boat
March 30, 2020

Former NOAA administrator Jane Lubchenco discusses her family's history of women in science, the importance of mentorship, her solution to achieving work-life balance,  and how citizen science can help foster trust between scientists and stakeholders.

Coalbrookdale by Night
January 23, 2014

There is overwhelming scientific evidence that Earth is warming and a preponderance of scientific evidence that human activities are the main cause.

Okpilak Glacier
January 23, 2014

Our global historical temperature records can be trusted to represent changes in Earth's temperature over long time periods.

October 22, 2009

NOAA Earth scientists discuss their roles and responsibilities in sharing what they know about the climate system with the public.

This visualization focuses on public acceptance of climate science. The set of interactive maps illustrates public opinion on a variety of climate beliefs, risk perceptions, and policy support. The data is from the Yale Project on Climate Communication and is updated every one to two years. The most recent data at the time of this record is 2019.

This learning activity provides a systematic and objective framework to enable students to develop skills to recognize whether a source of information is scientifically valid or not.

Even though this resource does not explicitly address CLEPs or ELEPs, it does fill the need for educational resources that teach students how to accurately assess if a source is scientifically valid or not. It also addresses NGSS Science and Engineering Practice standards ("engaging in an argument from evidence"; and "obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information").

This activity has students examine the misconception that there is no scientific consensus on climate change. Students explore temperature data and report their conclusions to the class. Then students examine techniques of science denial and examine a claim about scientific consensus.

Climate has varied in the past, but today's climate change rate is much more drastic due to human activity. Students explore past climate cycle graphs and compare the cycles with the current rate of change.

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