Includes the process of science and common misconceptions about climate science

October 22, 2009

NOAA Earth scientists discuss their roles and responsibilities in sharing what they know about the climate system with the public.

This activity in a case study format explores ice loss from the Greenland ice sheet by way of outlet glaciers that flow into the ocean. Students do basic calculations and learn about data trends, rates of change, uncertainty, and predictions.

In this activity, students explore whether statements made by the news and media on climate change-related issues are actually true. Examples are provided for Antarctic sea ice and hurricane intensity, but the activity could be extended to other topics as well.

In this activity, students select an argument of a climate skeptic, research it, and write up a mock dialog that portrays a back-and-forth discussion between the skeptic and a non-skeptic, while presenting a scientific argument that counters the false claim.

This visualization focuses on public acceptance of climate science. The set of interactive maps illustrates public opinion on a variety of climate beliefs, risk perceptions, and policy support. The data is from the Yale Project on Climate Communication.

In this activity students work with data to analyze local and global temperature anomaly data to look for warming trends. The activity focuses on the Great Lakes area.

In this activity from NOAA's Okeanos Explorer Education Materials Collection, learners investigate how methane hydrates might have been involved with the Cambrian explosion.

May 21, 2015

Deke Arndt, chief of the Monitoring Branch at the National Centers for Environmental Information, kicks off a new blog that will cover how climate records are collected and updated, how we know what we know about the climate, and how we can use climate information to make our communities more resilient.

This video is simple in its appearance, but it contains a wealth of relevant information about global climate models.