Instrumental measurements, proxy data, climate model projections

This visualization is a collection of maps, by continent, that project the impact on coastlines of a 216-foot rise in sea level, which is assumed to be the result of melting all the land ice on Earth.

This module contains five activities, in increasing complexity, that focus on understanding how to interpret and manipulate sea level data, using real data from NOAA.

In this video, Michael Mann and Peter Ramsdorf explore some of the information from the 2013 IPCC 5th report in light of public perceptions of climate science.

The NOAA Sea Level Trends map illustrates U.S. regional and some international trends in sea level, with arrows representing the direction and magnitude of change. Students can investigate sea level changes around the U.S. and some worldwide using an interactive map interface with supporting data plots and tables.

This interactive tool allows viewers to explore, by county, the areas of California threatened by a rise in sea level through this century.

This animation shows the Arctic sea ice September (minimum) extents from 1979-2012.

This set of activities is about carbon sources, sinks, and fluxes among them - both with and without anthropogenic components.

March 24, 2016

The 2015-2016 El Niño will go down as one of the strongest on record, and also, thanks to El Niño Rapid Response Campaign, one of the best observed.

November 20, 2015

With multiple sea surface temperature datasets come questions. What are they all for?

This lesson sequence guides students to learn about the geography and the unique characteristics of the Arctic, including vegetation, and people who live there. Students use Google Earth to explore the Arctic and learn about meteorological observations in the Arctic, including collecting their own data in hands-on experiments. This is the first part of a three-part curriculum about Arctic climate.