Instrumental measurements, proxy data, climate model projections

In 2014, the most essential indicators of Earth's changing climate continued to reflect trends of a warming planet, with several setting new records.  Here are NOAA Climate.gov's highlights from the State of the Climate in 2014 report released online today by the American Meteorological Society (AMS).

While many of us were wrapped up in March Madness this spring, Alaska residents and people across the globe participated in a different kind of competition.

In addition to its primary mission of observing space weather, the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite is carrying two instruments that are important to climate science: the NISTAR radiometer and the EPIC camera. 

Ocean scientists have designed a new aquatic robot that can go where they suspect some of the heat energy from global warming is hiding: in the abyss.

As the assessment now known as the BAMS State of the Climate report pushes into its third decade, international participation is at an all-time high. From atmospheric chemists to tropical meteorologists, more than 420 authors from institutions in 57 countries contributed to this year’s report.

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