This module contains five activities, in increasing complexity, that focus on understanding how to interpret and manipulate sea level data, using real data from NOAA.

This is a real-time map of current drought conditions in the US, which can be zoomed to the state level, with access to many more resources at that level. Some of these include the National Drought Regional Summaries and animations of historical data.

This video addresses the impact of climate change on several butterfly populations. Warming temperatures lead to shifts in location of populations of butterflies or die-offs of populations unable to adapt to changing conditions or shift to new locations.

This video provides an overview of changes happening in the Arctic.

NSTA Web Seminar
May 5, 2016

Types of weather, weather basics, extreme weather, monitoring extreme weather with satellites, and hands on investigations for students to collect data about weather- including GLOBE protocols, are topics that will be covered during this seminar...

ICCARS Lifelines Professional Learning Community (PLC) webinar series
May 2, 2016

This month’s topic is “Climate Change: Science, Impacts, and How Individuals Can Help,” with special guest Dr. Tom Kovacs, Professor of Meteorology in the Department of Geography and Geology and Program...

InTeGrate Webinar Series
April 21, 2016

This webinar will demonstrate how soils can be used to broaden students' understanding of the Earth system and human impacts on this system. Free and open to the public, this series will incorporate InTeGrate pedagogies...

March 24, 2016

The 2015-2016 El Niño will go down as one of the strongest on record, and also, thanks to El Niño Rapid Response Campaign, one of the best observed.

February 22, 2016

If you're thinking of bemoaning today's weather, comfort yourself with some history: today's the anniversary of the most severe Northeast snowstorm in the historical record. Guest blogger Mike Squires talks about how the February 22-26, 1969, snowstorm ranks head and shoulders above any other storm to hit the region since records began in 1900. 

February 5, 2016

When deciding if a snow event qualifies as a federal disaster, FEMA considers, among other things, how the event compares to previous snowstorms in the historical record. After spending a week going through those records, NECI's Deke Arndt talks about why snow can be the most difficult kid in the climate schoolroom. 

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