Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation

The Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation, released by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in May 2011, assesses existing literature on the future potential of renewable energy for the mitigation of climate change. It covers the six most important renewable energy technologies, as well as their integration into present and future energy systems.

Assessing Economic Impacts of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

Reliable estimates of the costs and benefits to the U.S. economy for various emissions reduction and adaptation strategies are critical to federal climate change R&D portfolio planning and investment decisions. At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Academies organized a workshop to consider these issues. The workshop participants discussed three dimensions: policy, analysis, and economics.

Strategies to Promote Commercialization and Deployment of Greenhouse Gas Intensity-Reducing Technologies and Practices

This report systematically examines the market readiness of key technologies important to meeting climate change mitigation goals.  It assesses the barriers and business risks impeding their progress and greater market application.  The report was sponsored by the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program (a multi-agency group led by the U.S. Department of Energy) and was submitted to the President and Congress in January 2009.

Climate Projections Based on Emissions Scenarios for Long-Lived and Short-Lived Radiatively Active Gases and Aerosols

An assessment of the effects of short-lived gases and particles in the atmosphere. They can significantly change regional surface temperatures. By the year 2100 short-lived gases and particles may account for as much as 40 percent of the warming over the continental U.S. in summertime.

Scenarios of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Atmospheric Concentrations

The findings presented in this report draw from scenarios designed to stabilize the influence of a suite of greenhouse gases. Three climate-modeling groups independently developed a reference scenario and then developed four contrasting stabilization scenarios for comparison.

Temperature Trends in the Lower Atmosphere: Steps for Understanding and Reconciling Differences

This report addresses previously identified discrepancies between observations and simulations of surface and atmospheric temperature trends.  It is an important revision to the conclusions of earlier reports from the U.S. National Research Council and the IPCC.

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