December 15, 2016

A Q & A about the science of detecting the influence of global warming on hurricanes, fires, and other extreme events.

Mrs Ples fossil in the Ditsong Museum of Natural History, Pretoria
November 9, 2016

Rick Potts of the Smithsonian Institution discusses the role of climate variation in the evolution of our ancestors.

September 7, 2016

Three days of heavy rains devastated Louisiana in mid-August 2016. NOAA models find that warming due to greenhouse gases has made an event like that at least 40% more likely and 10% more intense.

March 7, 2014

In October 2003, a little-known think tank in the Department of Defense quietly released a report warning that climate change could happen so suddenly it could pose a major threat to our country's national security. Why was the Pentagon worried about abrupt climate change? Because new evidence from Greenland showed it had happened before. 

February 15, 2012

James Roger Fleming presents a historical perspective on how our understanding of Earth's climate system developed through innovations and discoveries by pioneering scientists in the 1800s and 1900s who asked and answered fundamental questions about the causes and effects of global climate change.

 

February 10, 2010

NOAA researchers have built a "time machine" for weather that provides detailed snapshots of the global atmosphere from 1891 to 2008. The system's ability to "hindcast" past weather events is emerging as a powerful new tool for detecting and quantifying climate change.

January 8, 2016

Was El Niño to blame for the above-average temperatures during November and December 2015?  As always, the answer is not that simple.  

This Earth Exploration Toolbook chapter uses ArcGIS and climate data from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Climate Change Scenarios GIS Data Portal to help users learn the basics of GIS-based climate modeling. The five-part exercise involves calculating summer average temperatures for the present day and future climate modeled output, visually comparing the temperature differences for the two model runs, and creating a temperature anomaly map to highlight air temperature increases or decreases around the world.

Students gain experience using a spreadsheet and working with others to decide how to conduct their model 'experiments' with the NASA GEEBITT (Global Equilibrium Energy Balance Interactive Tinker Toy). This activity helps students become more familiar with the physical processes that made Earth's early climate so different from that of today. Students also acquire first-hand experience with a limitation in modeling, specifically, parameterization of critical processes.

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