March 24, 2016

The 2015-2016 El Niño will go down as one of the strongest on record, and also, thanks to El Niño Rapid Response Campaign, one of the best observed.

March 16, 2016

Is El Niño the Marcia Brady of climate variability? In this week's Beyond the Data blog, Jake Crouch talks about whether El Niño played a starring role in this winter's climate.

March 3, 2016

In this week's Beyond the Data blog, NCEI's Deke Arndt explains how comparing a record-setting warm streak from 2015 to one in 1944 is like comparing the tallest player in the NBA to the tallest kid in 2nd grade.

January 22, 2016

In the midst of the mega snowstorm bearing down on the East, NCEI's Deke Arndt looks longingly back at December's warmth in his latest Beyond the Data blog. 

November 24, 2015

This week, Beyond the Data looks at one of the more well-grounded “rules of thumb” for understanding climate change: cooler "things" are warming more quickly than warmer things.

September 29, 2016

For those who are still waiting for winter's first snow, Deke Arndt blogs about using historical climate data to ballpark when it might arrive. 

September 17, 2015

This week's bloggers use the historical record to generate 10,000 possible scenarios for the remainder of 2015. In 97% of them, 2015 sets a new record temperature.

This interactive lets students determine the extent of average temperature change both in their community and anywhere else in the world, relative to average temperatures for the three decades between 1951 and 1980.

This video explores what scientists know about how changes in global climate and increasing temperatures affect different extreme weather events.

In this series of activities students investigate the effects of black carbon on snow and ice melt in the Arctic. The lesson begins with an activity that introduces students to the concept of thermal energy and how light and dark surfaces reflect and absorb radiant energy differently. To help quantify the relationship between carbon
and ice melt, the wet lab activity has students create ice samples both with and without black carbon and then compare how they respond to radiant energy while considering implications for the Arctic.

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