November 24, 2015

This week, Beyond the Data looks at one of the more well-grounded “rules of thumb” for understanding climate change: cooler "things" are warming more quickly than warmer things.

October 25, 2015

For those who are still waiting for winter's first snow, Deke Arndt blogs about using historical climate data to ballpark when it might arrive. 

September 17, 2015

This week's bloggers use the historical record to generate 10,000 possible scenarios for the remainder of 2015. In 97% of them, 2015 sets a new record temperature.

This series of four animations shows how some of the key indicators of climate change (average global temperature, sea level, sea ice extent, carbon emissions) have changed in Earth's recent history.

This video discusses carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere that have increased due to the burning of fossil fuels in electricity generation, transportation, and industrial processes. Video includes history of Keeling and his research, as well as the seasonal fluctuations in CO2.

This video, from Yale Climate Connections, explores the 2014 melting of the West Antarctic ice sheet that captured headlines. Interviews, animations, and news broadcasts explore what the melting meant for both the future of some of the Antarctic glaciers and sea level rise, and informs the viewer how seafloor terrain influences the speed of ice sheet melt.

In this video scientists discuss possible rates of sea level rise, storms and resulting damage, rising temperatures and melting ice, and their collective effects on ecosystems.

This visualization shows in five steps how ice cores provide a measure of the temperature in the past.

This visualization presents a collection of sea ice data taken over a period of 34 years. Selected data can be animated to show changes in sea ice extent over time. Data is added by the National Snow and Ice Data Center as it becomes available.

In this activity, students use maps and data to learn about where and how hurricanes form and possible correlations with climate change affecting their strength.

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