Includes natural changes (cyclic variability, volcanic eruptions, solar output) and human-caused changes (due to GHG emissions and land use changes)

In this activity, students use climate data to develop a simple graph of how climate has changed over time and then present the result in a blog, emphasizing effective science communication.

This activity explores how the topic of climate change is represented in various forms of writing, from scholarly articles to opinion pieces and works of fiction. While the content does not emphasize climate science itself, it instead allows students to focus on how the science is being portrayed.

In this video, Michael Mann and Peter Ramsdorf explore some of the information from the 2013 IPCC 5th report in light of public perceptions of climate science.

Learn ways you and your team can engage audiences with topics of climate and ocean change
May 6, 2016

A one day workshop for educators interested on learning to expand their climate change interpretation at their own institutions.

Learn ways you and your team can engage audiences with topics of climate and ocean change
April 28, 2016

A one day workshop for educators interested on learning to expand their climate change interpretation at their own institutions.

Learn ways you and your team can engage audiences with topics of climate and ocean change
April 14, 2016

A one day workshop for educators interested on learning to expand their climate change interpretation at their own institutions.

Learn ways you and your team can engage audiences with topics of climate and ocean change
April 8, 2016

A one day workshop for educators interested on learning to expand their climate change interpretation at their own institutions. ...

This video features research conducted at University of Colorado's Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, which studies isotopes of hydrogen trapped in ice cores to understand climate changes in the past.

In this activity students work with data to analyze local and global temperature anomaly data to look for warming trends. The activity focuses on the Great Lakes area.

This is a multi-media teaching tool to learn about climate change. The tool is comprised of stills, video clips, graphic representations, and explanatory text about climate science. Acclaimed photographer James Balog and his Extreme Ice team put this teaching tool together.

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