This video is one of a series from the Switch Energy project. It presents pros and cons of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. In this video, new fracking technologies are presented as more economical and environmentally safe.

This is a slideshow without audio about the effects of sea level rise on a Louisianan coastal community - the Isle de Jean Charles -- and focusing on the human impact of disappearing land.

This activity introduces students to the process of converting sunlight into electricity through the use of photovoltaics (solar cells). Students complete a reading passage with questions and an inquiry lab using small photovoltaic cells.

In this activity, students compare carbon dioxide (CO2) data from Mauna Loa Observatory, Barrow (Alaska), and the South Pole over the past 40 years to help them better understand what controls atmospheric carbon dioxide. This activity makes extensive use of Excel.

This video is part of the Climate Science in a Nutshell series. This short, animated video looks at evidence of a rapidly warming planet. It discusses how air bubbles in ice cores can be used to estimate Earth's average air temperature for thousands of years and how direct measurements document air temperatures from 1880.

Students will use real satellite data to determine 1) where the greatest concentrations of aerosols are located during the course of a year in the tropical Atlantic region and 2) their source of origin. This is an inquiry-style lesson where students pull real aerosol data and attempt to identify trends among data sets.

Consider joining MADE-CLEAR on a five-day professional development experience on climate change and its solutions led by experts in climate science and educational researchers. You will explore the science of climate change through activities, inquiry, and small group work on curriculum.  The Academy will be held at the University of Delaware’s Virden Center.

 

Dr. Kathleen Tierney, Director of the CU Boulder’s Natural Hazards Center and Dr. Kevin Trenberth from the Climate Analysis Section at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) will join facilitators Dr. Anne Gold of CIRES and Deb Morrison of University Colorado Boulder in an interactive panel discussion. 

These experts will discuss how scientists can forecast where extreme events will occur and their severity. They will cover what communities and governments  can do to increase resiliency to extreme weather events and how the scientific community can help prepare citizens and government. 

What determines a planet's climate? In this web seminar, you will use NASA mission data collected from NASA satellites to show how we determine a planet’s climate. The featured lesson in this web seminar is Modeling Hot and Cold Planets from the Earth Climate Course. Students explore why extreme temperature differences exist between Earth and other planets in our solar system.

Register today!

Josh Sniedeman is this year’s Department of Energy’s Einstein Science Educator Fellow.  He will introduce the Energy Literacy Essential Principles developed with the goal of building an energy literate public. In addition, we will introduce the Will Steger Foundation’s Experience Energy Curriculum and Mike Arquin, founder of Kidwind will demonstrate one of Kidwind’s many great activities.

 

 

Josh Sniedeman Josh Sniedeman is the current Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow for the Department of Energy – a distinction awarded to outstanding k-12 STEM educators. Sniedeman will be guiding us through an in-depth look at energy literacy and what it means for educators.
 


Michael ArquinMichael Arquin is the Founder and Director of KidWind, a leading resource for hands-on, classroom-friendly renewable energy projects. KidWind curricula and classroom wind-turbine kits are used by educators around the country and across many grade levels. Arquin will share with us some of their most-popular activities.
 
Attendees will also be introduced to Experience Energy, a curriculum developed by the Will Steger Foundation to engage elementary and middle school students in Minnesota energy literacy.

 

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