In this activity, students will learn the difference between sea ice and glaciers in relation to sea level rise. They will create and explore topographic maps as a means of studying sea level rise and how it will affect Alaska's coastline.

This video features a short animated sequence that illustrates the difference between young and old carbon released into the atmosphere from the consumption of food (young carbon) and the burning of fossil fuels (old carbon).

This series of five activities about ocean acidification incorporates real data from NOAA. The activities are organized as a pathway, with five levels increasing in sophistication, and different data-based inquiry activities.

This video provides a good overview of ice-albedo feedback. Albedo-Climate feedback is a positive feedback that builds student understanding of climate change.

This video from Earth: The Operators' Manual describes how fossil fuels are made, and it compares how long it takes to create coal, oil and natural gas (millions of years), with how fast we're using them (hundreds of years). Narrated by Dr. Richard Alley.

This video examines the thawing of permafrost due to changes in climate and shows examples of the impacts that warming temperatures have on permafrost in the Arctic, including the release of the greenhouse gas methane. Dramatic results are shown, including sink holes forming on the landscape and beneath buildings, roads, and other infrastructure, causing some communities to relocate.

Monday, April 7, 2014 at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

Frank Niepold, NOAA Climate Program Office's Education coordinator, will discuss developing student’s 21st century skills by incorporating digitally available activities, videos, and visualizations into the classroom. The rigorously reviewed digital educational resources developed by the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) and syndicated through NOAA’s Climate.gov web site will be examined. A focal point will be how to teach a climate and energy learning progression across elementary through high school grades taking into account contact time and coherence matter constraints.

Thursday, March 26th - 3:30-4:45pm MT/4:30pm CT/5:30pm ET

The National Climate Assessment, released in May of 2014, summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, touching on many disciplines: earth science, biology, human health, engineering, technology, economics, and policy. Explore the document with a lead NCA author, then learn about related educator resources with Kristen Poppleton from the Will Steger Foundation. Discover how to bring these resources into classroom lessons, engage students in data collection and analysis, share visualizations and citizen science projects. Focus this month will be on the Great Plains region.  Watch for additional regions to be featured in upcoming “Ask US” sessions.

 

Explore the science of climate change, and how scientists study climate and make predictions using modeling. This NASA-funded course will take place over three weeks, both online and onsite at AMNH, and will be co-taught by Museum educators and climate scientists.

Funding is provided by NASA's Global Climate Change Education Program under Grant Number NNX10AB59A.

April 17, 2014, at 4 p.m. EDT

From proxy data to direct observations, all signs point to the same conclusion: Earth's climate system is warming at an unprecedented rate. Join presenter Margaret Mooney from the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies to learn more about how scientists measure and document warming trends along with tools to teach this topic to your students.

Certificates of professional development hours are available upon request. Additional session dates will be announced soon.

"Ask NICE" Online Professional Development Series

Join the NASA Innovations in Climate Education, or NICE, team for the final webinar of the 2013-14 school year in their series of Google Plus Hangout professional development sessions. Extended workshops will be held over the summer with those who have participated in the series. A new series of online Ask NICE sessions will begin in the fall.

For more information, visit https://nice.larc.nasa.gov/asknice/ or http://dln.nasa.gov. Questions about this series should be sent to Bonnie Murray at bonnie.murray@nasa.gov.

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