This video describes why tropical ice cores are important and provide different information than polar ice cores, why getting them now is important (they are disappearing), and how scientists get them. The work of glaciologist Lonnie Thompson is featured, with a focus on his work collecting cores of ice from high mountain glaciers that contain significant data about past climate change.

This video features residents of Shishmaref, Alaska, plus environmental journalist Elizabeth Kolbert and scientist John Holdren, exploring the human impacts of global climate change. The roles of teachers, scientists, policymakers, and concerned citizens in mitigating the changes are highlighted.

This video illustrates the advantages of woody biomass as a renewable, carbon-neutral energy source. Woody biomass is underutilized and often overlooked as a renewable fuel, and it can be harvested sustainably and burned cleanly.

Bell Telephone Science Hour produced this video in 1958, explaining how the production of CO2 from factories and automobiles is causing the atmosphere to warm, melting the polar ice caps, and causing the sea level to rise.

This color-coded map displays a progression of changing five-year average global surface temperatures anomalies from 1880 through 2010. The final frame represents global temperature anomalies averaged from 2006 to 2010. The temperature anomalies are computed relative to the base period 1951-1980.

This music video features a rap song about some of the causes and effects of climate change with the goal of increasing awareness of climate change and how it will impact nature and humans. The website also includes links to short fact sheets with lyrics to the song that are annotated with the sources of the information in the lyrics.

In this webinar, Climate Change LIVE partners highlight professional development programs to empower you as a climate change educator!  Each program offers training to increase your understanding of essential climate concepts and provide you with the tools and resources to implement a science-based climate change curriculum in your classroom and connect with networks of other educators teaching about climate change.  Most of these programs offer grants to schools to help them implement climate change solution-related action projects, and include on-site and online training opportunities.

Presenters: Will Steger Foundation, NOAA, Alliance for Climate Education, ACE 

May (6, 13, 20, 27) and June (17, 24), 2015
Virtual Workshop

 

One of the best ways for students to understand the critical Earth issues facing humanity is through the analysis and interpretation of actual data. Fortunately, there are now many organizations that not only monitor many geophysical and geochemical properties of the earth but provide the data in user-friendly ways. Whether it is through maps, images, animations, or raw data, these data can be mined and interpreted by undergraduates in ways that allow them to develop an understanding of both the relevant critical Earth issues and of issues related to the reliability, errors, and significance associated with scientific conclusions and assertions.

This workshop aims to help instructors of undergraduate classes develop classroom activities, demonstrations, and research opportunities on topics of current societal relevance and interest using new online resources of geoscience data. These activities will be added to the extensive Cutting Edge online teaching activities collection.

REGISTRATION DEADLINE: March 1, 2015

This workshop is part of the On the Cutting Edge professional development program for current and future geoscience faculty, and is sponsored by the National Association of Geoscience Teachers with funding provided by NAGT, and a grant from the National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education and other contributing sponsors.

 

Image Credit: The carbon dioxide visualization was produced by a computer model called GEOS-5, created by scientists at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Global Modeling and Assimilation Office. 

Session topics focus on sharing tested models and strategies for effectively teaching this topic in undergraduate courses. Each participant will contribute tested teaching materials and strategies and participate in the development and review of classroom resources that take advantage of cutting edge technology and pedagogy.

Application deadline - March 1, 2013

Experts from NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory, Dr. Stephanie Herring and Dr. Martin Hoerling, will join facilitators Dr. Anne Gold of CIRES and Deb Morrison of University Colorado Boulder.

Dr. Herring and Dr. Hoerling collaborated on the Explaining Extreme Events of 2012 From a Climate Perspective report, which resulted in their inclusion on Foreign Policy magazine's Top 100 Global Thinkers list.

In this interactive panel discussion, the scientists will discuss what characterizes an extreme weather event. They also will explore how scientists attribute single events or trends in extreme weather to climate change.

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