In this video clip from Earth: The Operators' Manual, host Richard Alley discusses China's efforts to develop clean energy technologies and to reduce CO2 in the atmosphere, by building coal plants using CO2 sequestration technology. (scroll down page for video)

This activity addresses climate change impacts that affect all states that are part of the Colorado River Basin and are dependent on its water. Students examine available data, the possible consequences of changes to various user groups, and suggest solutions to adapt to these changes.

This humorous video segment includes prominent roles for NPR's Robert Krulwhich and the Car Talk hosts. It highlights the electrochemical reaction that takes place within a hydrogen fuel cell and explores the challenges of producing the pure hydrogen that fuels it.

This activity describes the flow of carbon in the environment and focuses on how much carbon is stored in trees. It goes on to have students analyze data and make calculations about the amount of carbon stored in a set of trees at three sites in a wooded area that were to be cut down to build a college dormitory.

In this activity, students look at how much solar energy is generated by photovoltaic panels on rooftops or exposed ground locations at installations around the United States. They explore three different websites that monitor and report solar energy production from panels at many different locations. Next, they examine data from a single location, as well as compare data from two different locations. Lastly, they consider how much of a school's or home's energy needs could be supplied by solar power.

This click-through slideshow of solar technologies provides photos, illustrations, and text to describe eight passive and active solar technologies: thermal trough, mirrored dish, power tower, thin film, concentrated sunlight, solar paint, evacuated-tube collectors, and sun-grown biofuel.

This PBS video shows how Klaus Lackner, a geophysicist at Columbia University, is trying to tackle the problem of rising atmospheric CO2 levels by using an idea inspired by his daughter's 8th-grade science fair project.

This simulation allows the user to project CO2 sources and sinks by adjusting the points on a graph and then running the simulation to see projections for the impact on atmospheric CO2 and global temperatures.

In this video the Pentagon's focus on climate change is described as a significant factor as the military examines potential risks, strategic responses, and impacts of climate change on future military and humanitarian missions. In 2010, for the first time, the Pentagon focused on climate change as a significant factor in its Quadrennial Defense Review of potential risks and strategic responses. Rear Admiral David Titley, Oceanographer of the Navy, explains why the US military sees clear evidence of climate change, and how those changes will affect future military and humanitarian missions.

This static graph of changes in CO2 concentrations is going back 400,000 years, showing the dramatic spike in recent years.

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