In this video segment, adapted from a student video produced at Northwest Indian College in Bellingham Washington, Native American elders discuss the impact of climate change on salmon populations and the importance of restoring balance in the natural world.

This qualitative graphic illustrates the various factors that affect the amount of solar radiation hitting or being absorbed by Earth's surface such as aerosols, clouds, and albedo.

This activity covers the role that the oceans may play in climate change and how climate change may affect the oceans. It is lesson 8 in a nine-lesson module Visualizing and Understanding the Science of Climate Change.

This video from NASA features scientists who describe the role of salt in the oceans and global oceanic circulation, especially the effect of salinity on the density of water and its global circulation, with reference to global climate change.

This video segment depicts how climate change is impacting the migration of Canada's barren-ground caribou. Changes in the plant community and tree lines will change the prime habitat for some herds of caribou. Caribou are faced with adapting to these barrens shrinking, often with serious consequences.

This multi-week project begins with a measurement of baseline consumptive behavior followed by three weeks of working to reduce the use of water, energy, high-impact foods, and other materials. The assignment uses an Excel spreadsheet that calculates direct energy and water use as well as indirect CO2 and water use associated with food consumption. After completing the project, students understand that they do indeed play a role in the big picture. They also learn that making small changes to their lifestyles is not difficult and they can easily reduce their personal impact on the environment.

July 31 to August 1- ONLINE SESSIONS
August 5-6 - SESSIONS at NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Columbia University in New York City 
Graduate Credit Option: University of Michigan-Flint
 
Climate Change in the Classroom is a professional development event for 8th – 12th grade English, Math, Science and Social Studies teachers. The workshop sponsors, GISS, Columbia University, the Science Museum of Minnesota, University of Michigan-Flint, Real World Matters and Mindblue Productions, invite teachers to explore the science underlying global climate change in today's headlines with researchers on the frontlines of advancing knowledge.  A special focus will be developing climate literacy to evaluate energy solutions for mitigating global climate change.  Guided by education faculty, teachers will pilot a new curriculum - Hot: One World, One Climate. CCIC will involve teachers in a learning experience that will deepen understanding about how students learn science, build strategies for using climate change topics as a context for science and math instruction, and facilitate student learning through problem-solving, inquiry and an engaging role-play simulation.            
 
Learn More and Apply @ http://www.giss.nasa.gov/meetings/

Learn about integrating climate change education into your classroom or informal education programming, get an introduction to regionally relevant climate science, and hear about how other educators have used these materials. The webinar will be presented by educators who have used the resources in their own teaching, both in the classroom and in place-based education.

Certificates of attendance for professional development contact hours can be requested after the webinar; instructions will be provided during the session.

The presentation will cover:

  • Ohio Sea Grant’s updated Great Lakes Climate Change Curriculum
  • climate and Great Lakes literacy principles
  • informal resources to supplement and expand lesson plans

This course explores the science of climate change. Students will learn how the climate system works; what factors cause climate to change across different time scales and how those factors interact; how climate has changed in the past; how scientists use models, observations and theory to make predictions about future climate; and the possible consequences of climate change for our planet. The course explores evidence for changes in ocean temperature, sea level and acidity due to global warming. Students will learn how climate change today is different from past climate cycles and how satellites and other technologies are revealing the global signals of a changing climate. Finally, the course looks at the connection between human activity and the current warming trend and considers some of the potential social, economic and environmental consequences of climate change.

Are you apprehensive teaching about climate change? Not sure what to believe after reading different headlines and hearing controversies? ClimateChangeLIVE will help you sort it out for yourself and be confident in educating your students about this important topic! This webinar will be presented by education specialists from three federal agencies immersed in climate change research and issues. We’ll be joined by EPA’s 2012 Climate Communicator of the Year, the Alliance for Climate Education (ACE). ACE will share tips about how to engage your students, and how your class can be part of the solution, addressing climate change head-on. We’ll feature highlights of materials focused on the process of science, how to judge whether what you’re reading is good science, as well as misconceptions about climate change. The Department of Energy will highlight the Energy Literacy Framework, which identifies the Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts one would understand to be energy and climate literate.

Presenters: U.S. Forest Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Dept. of Energy, Alliance for Climate Education

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