In this activity students download satellite images displaying land surface temperature, snow cover, and reflected short wave radiation data from the NASA Earth Observation (NEO) Web site. They then explore and animate these images using the free tool ImageJ and utilize the Web-based analysis tools built into NEO to observe, graph, and analyze the relationships among these three variables.

This interactive diagram from the National Academy of Sciences shows how we rely on a variety of primary energy sources (solar, nuclear, hydro, wind, geothermal, natural gas, coal, biomass, oil) to supply energy to four end-use sectors (residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation). It also focuses on lost or degraded energy.

CEO2 is a role-playing game that helps students explore different business strategies in order to maximize profit, significantly cut CO2 emissions, and develop low-carbon products by 2030.

This figure, the famous Keeling Curve, shows the history of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations as directly measured at Mauna Loa, Hawaii. This curve is an essential piece of evidence that shows the increased greenhouse gases that cause recent increases in global temperatures.

The Climate Momentum Simulation allows users to quickly compare the resulting sea level rise, temperature change, atmospheric CO2, and global CO2 emissions from six different policy options: 1) Business As Usual, 2) March 2009 Country Proposals, 3) Flatten CO2 emissions by 2025, 4) 29% below 2009 levels by 2040, 5) 80% reduction of global fossil fuel plus a 90% reduction in land use emissions by 2050, and 6) 95 reduction of CO2 emissions by 2020). Based on the more complex C-ROADS simulator.

This activity leads students through a sequence of learning steps that highlight the embedded energy that is necessary to produce various types of food. Students start by thinking through the components of a basic meal and are later asked to review the necessary energy to produce different types of protein.

January session: Thursday, Jan 15th- 4:30-5:45pm ET 

Although 97% of active climate scientists agree that the earth is warming due to human activities, some polls have found that only 44% of American share this view. As an educator, you are likely to encounter people who have received information that conflicts with the accepted climate science, perhaps from sources that they trust. This session will help you better understand American's perceptions of climate change and provide tips for better communicating climate science.

Click here on the day of the event to connect to the Ask US session. (You can access this page about 10 minutes before the start)

This event is a Google Hangout and will be broadcast live on YouTube. Questions may be submitted during the Hangout using the comments section or via Twitter –use  #AskUS

Online Educator Professional Development on Earth System Science Topics from ESTEEM (Earth Systems, Technology and Energy Education for MUREP –Minority University Research and Education Program)

 

Where in the United States would the use of solar panels be most effective? This web seminar features the “Solar Cell Energy Availability From Around the Country” activity from MY NASA DATA. During this seminar you will become familiar with the activity by comparing the monthly averages of surface downward radiation in various locations around the United States and analyzing areas where the population would be more or less conducive to having solar panels. 

Register today!

Presented by: Second Nature in partnership with the American Meteorological Society (AMS)

Join AMS & Second Nature for a webinar aimed at promoting the importance of basic climate science education at Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs).

This webinar will provide an overview of:
• The AMS Climate Studies Diversity Project, its eligibility requirements and application process 
• Previous Diversity Project participants’ experiences, and opportunities for Minority-Serving Institutions
• How to integrate the AMS Climate Studies Diversity Project and the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) for campus sustainability planning 

Panelists:
• James Brey – Director, AMS Education Program 
• Jason Szymanski – Professor of Chemistry & Geosciences, Monroe Community College 
• John Warford– Professor of Geography, Florida Agricultural & Mechanical University 
• Van Du – ACUPCC Program Manager, Second Nature 

 

Funded by NSF

The 2015 first annual Earth Educators' Rendezvous will bring together researchers and practitioners working in all aspects of undergraduate Earth education. We welcome faculty from all disciplines who are interested in improving their teaching about the Earth, administrators from geoscience departments and interdisciplinary programs that want to become stronger, and education researchers of all types. Join the Rendezvous for 2 or 3 days or stay the whole week.

Program

The Earth Rendezvous program will bring together these themes into a rich tapestry of workshops, contributed talks and posters, plenary sessions, and working groups. Drawing across the work currently taking place in geoscience, environmental, and sustainability education, meeting attendees will have the opportunity to learn broadly, focus on a particular issue or challenge, or something in between. All are invited to submit abstracts to the contributed program of posters and short presentations.

Registration and Abstract Submission

Abstract Deadline: March 1, 2015
Early Registration Deadline: April 13, 2015

 

Part of the InTeGrate and Cutting Edge

Programs for Improved Undergraduate Education On the Cutting Edge is managed by NAGT

Program Sponsors: National Science Foundation, The National Association of Geoscience Teachers, The Geological Society of America, The American Geophysical Union

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