This interactive map allows students to experiment with decadal average temperature projections. Overall temperatures are expected to rise throughout the century and this tool demonstrates those projected measurements.

This PBS video shows how Klaus Lackner, a geophysicist at Columbia University, is trying to tackle the problem of rising atmospheric CO2 levels by using an idea inspired by his daughter's 8th-grade science fair project.

In this activity, students develop an understanding of the relationship between natural phenomena, weather, and climate change: the study known as phenology. In addition, they learn how cultural events are tied to the timing of seasonal events. Students brainstorm annual natural phenomena that are tied to seasonal weather changes. Next, they receive information regarding the Japanese springtime festival of Hanami, celebrating the appearance of cherry blossoms. Students plot and interpret average bloom date data from over the past 1100 years.

This video segment uses data-based visual NOAA representations to trace the path of surface ocean currents around the globe and explore their role in creating climate zones. Ocean surface currents have a major impact on regional climate around the world, bringing coastal fog to San Francisco and comfortable temperatures to the British Isles.

This video presents predictions and solutions for range shifts (wildlife corridors) by an iconic species of North American wilderness: the wolverine.

These animations depict the three major Milankovitch Cycles that impact global climate, visually demonstrating the definitions of eccentricity, obliquity, and precession, and their ranges of variation and timing on Earth.

Join us on Monday, March 2nd at 7:30 PM Eastern Time for: Western Water Resources, Climate, and Science

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar

 

Mark Twain famously noted that “whiskey is for drinking; water is for fighting over.” This is particularly true in the semi-arid western United States where the balance between water supply and water demand is nearly equal. Stress on the system is exacerbated by both human demands on the system but also climatevariability and change. Kevin Werner, NOAA’s Western Region Climate Services Director will describe the water resources environment in the Western United States including the impact of climate change. He will also describe his own experience working with decision makers in the water resources sector to utilize forecasts and science from NOAA to improve their operations. 

Following the webinar, there will be an informal discussion of the topics presented. All attendees are invited to participate. There are limited spaces for this discussion, information on joining will be provided during the event.

Please share this opportunity will all interested colleagues and Networks. 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar. Seriously, read the following and save it for reference:

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting at the start time.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting using VOIP, dial 1 (415) 655-0059 for audio. The access code is: 114-447-768. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 158-091-955

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

Vicki Arthur will lead participants through a wide range of education resources from the U.S. Forest Service for teaching about climate change. Forest Service researchers have been observing and studying the effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems for over 30 years. Learn how your students can collect and enter tree data to quantify and put a dollar value on the services that your school yard trees provide.  Discover an interactive atlas where students can learn about computer modeling while observing the potential effects of different emissions scenarios on the ranges of birds and trees. 

 

This program featured:

  • Presentation by the award-winning Alliance for Climate Education (ACE)
  • Student moderators and panel discussions
  • Videos of student-led projects from across the country
  • Student perspectives that will lead to the conversation in the second webcast

A recording is available.

Date: Wednesday, April 29, 2015
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

In July, 2012, the world witnessed a shocking event when widespread melting occurred over the surface of 97% of the Greenland Ice Sheet. According to ice core records, the last time such widespread melting occurred was in 1889. What caused such widespread melt? Was it just the warm temperatures, or is it a more complicated situation? Register today!

Dr. Mary Albert and her Dartmouth graduate students happened to be on the Greenland Ice Sheet at just the right time to gather some evidence. They excavated samples of the refrozen surface melt layer to take back to the U.S. for study, where their team investigated the physical, chemical, and isotopic aspects of that layer. They also looked deeper into the ice sheet and investigated evidence from firn (old snow) cores that contained melt layers dating back to 1889. They discovered that both in 2012 and in 1889, the warming and soot that changed the snow albedo (reflectivity) had both been necessary to synergistically create the melt; neither factor alone could have achieved melt in the cold, high, dry snow regions on the ice sheet.

Alden Adolph is now working with Mary on a project in New Hampshire to investigate climate change, snow albedo, and land use change on a project that is much closer to home. In Greenland, the soot from forest fires travels long distances to end up on the snow, where it changes the albedo. In New Hampshire, soot and aerosols can come from similar distant sources, but also from very local sources like wood stoves down the street. Alden will show how engineers and scientists use evidence to examine the importance of snow albedo even here in New England. Alden will also share ways in which she inspires younger students in the field, so that they can share in the excitement of research. Please join us for this relevant webinar, to learn how scientists used evidence from multiple sources to learn what caused the recent big melt, and why understanding your regional albedo is important to your future.

Details

Title: Fire and Ice: Snow Albedo and Our Future
Target audience: K–12 educators
Date: Wednesday, April 29, 2015
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenter: Dr. Mary AlbertAlden AdolphLinda Morris

Registration

Register today to participate in this web seminar. Upon registering you will receive an e-mail confirmation including information about the program and suggested links to visit in preparation of the event. Additional information about the web seminar will be e-mailed to you days before the program.

Each web seminar is a unique, stand-alone, program. Archives of the web seminars and the presenters’ PowerPoint presentations will be available through the links on this web page. Learn more about the features of the web seminar and read answers to frequently asked questions from participants.

 

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