Consider joining MADE-CLEAR on a five-day professional development experience on climate change and its solutions led by experts in climate science and educational researchers. You will explore the science of climate change through activities, inquiry, and small group work on curriculum.  The Academy will be held at the University of Delaware’s Virden Center.

 

Dr. Kathleen Tierney, Director of the CU Boulder’s Natural Hazards Center and Dr. Kevin Trenberth from the Climate Analysis Section at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) will join facilitators Dr. Anne Gold of CIRES and Deb Morrison of University Colorado Boulder in an interactive panel discussion. 

These experts will discuss how scientists can forecast where extreme events will occur and their severity. They will cover what communities and governments  can do to increase resiliency to extreme weather events and how the scientific community can help prepare citizens and government. 

Join them for this self-paced online course (Massive Open Online Course, MOOC).  The course will run over 4.5 weeks requiring a total of 20-25 hours to complete, start date is April 1, 2015.

Why is water at the heart of so much conflict in the American West? How have major cities and extensive agricultural systems been able to thrive in the Western United States despite most of the region being either a desert or semi-desert environment? How will a warming climate affect the availability and use of water in a region populated by tens of millions of people?

Join us in exploring these and other questions as we combine an overview of the science behind water and climate in the Western US with a survey of the major legal, political, and cultural issues focused on this precious resource.

You will hear from over 15 experts in water management, policy, and research in the West. We will start with history, politics and culture of water development in the Western US (module 1) and hydrology, water demand and climate in the Western US (module 2) before we dive into a case study around the Colorado River Basin (module 3) and explore controversial water issues (module 4).

This course will include many resources for educators. Educators can earn professional development credit by signing up for an parallel two credit hours course at the cost of $140.

This course is free and open to the public.  Register now!

 

Anne Gold, Associate Scientist and Science Educator, CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

Eric Gordon, Managing Director of Western Water Assessment, CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

What determines a planet's climate? In this web seminar, you will use NASA mission data collected from NASA satellites to show how we determine a planet’s climate. The featured lesson in this web seminar is Modeling Hot and Cold Planets from the Earth Climate Course. Students explore why extreme temperature differences exist between Earth and other planets in our solar system.

Register today!

Josh Sniedeman is this year’s Department of Energy’s Einstein Science Educator Fellow.  He will introduce the Energy Literacy Essential Principles developed with the goal of building an energy literate public. In addition, we will introduce the Will Steger Foundation’s Experience Energy Curriculum and Mike Arquin, founder of Kidwind will demonstrate one of Kidwind’s many great activities.

 

 

Josh Sniedeman Josh Sniedeman is the current Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow for the Department of Energy – a distinction awarded to outstanding k-12 STEM educators. Sniedeman will be guiding us through an in-depth look at energy literacy and what it means for educators.
 


Michael ArquinMichael Arquin is the Founder and Director of KidWind, a leading resource for hands-on, classroom-friendly renewable energy projects. KidWind curricula and classroom wind-turbine kits are used by educators around the country and across many grade levels. Arquin will share with us some of their most-popular activities.
 
Attendees will also be introduced to Experience Energy, a curriculum developed by the Will Steger Foundation to engage elementary and middle school students in Minnesota energy literacy.

 

Wednesday, February 18th – 4:00pm PT/7:00pm ET

The National Climate Assessment, released in May of 2014, summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, touching on many disciplines: earth science, biology, human health, engineering, technology, economics, and policy. Explore the document with a lead NCA author, then learn about related educator resources with Minda Berbeco from the National Center for Science Education. Discover how to bring these resources into classroom lessons, engage students in data collection and analysis, share visualizations and citizen science projects. 

Focus this month will be on the Southwest region. Watch for additional regions to be featured in upcoming “Ask US” sessions.

During this half-day symposium at the NSTA 2013 National Conference in San Antonio, scientists and education specialists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will discuss how NOAA collects, manages, and analyzes data about climate and how educators can access and use this data in the classroom. Participants will learn about websites and resources that utilize climate data, including drought, sea surface temperature, coastal water quality, and ocean acidification.

Attendance at the symposium requires conference registration.

Speaker: Minda Berbeco, PhD, Programs and Policy Director, National Center for Science Education
Resources: Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN),PINEMAP, WSF Curriculum

How can educators teach children about local impacts of climate change? Where can they find good resources for activities and up-to-date scientific information from reputable sources? Minda Berbeco is the Programs and Policy Director at the National Center for Science Education. She will be talking about the newly released National Climate Assessment, a scientific and governmental resource that demonstrates the local impacts on climate change and projections for the future. She will present on how to bring the NCA into the classroom and what vetted resources are available. We will focus on resources to make climate change local and relevant.

Application deadline is Monday, March 16, 2015

The National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation announces a professional development opportunity for interpreters who focus on climate change and ocean issues.

About the National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI)

NNOCCI is a collaborative effort led by the New England Aquarium with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, the FrameWorks Institute, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the National Aquarium in Baltimore, Monterey Bay Aquarium, the New Knowledge Organization in partnership with Pennsylvania State University and the Ohio's Center for Science and Industry. With support from the NSF Climate Change Education Partnership program, NNOCCI's goal is to establish a national network of professionals who are skilled in communicating climate science to the American public in ways that are engaging and stimulate productive dialog.

What is a Study Circle? 
A NNOCCI Study Circle is a cross-disciplinary learning group made up of peers with expertise from fields of professional interpretation, climate and ocean sciences and communications and cultural sciences. Through a series of facilitated in-person meetings, webinars, conference calls and practical activities, participants build knowledge of ocean and climate science and communications and cultural sciences. They apply lessons learned to communications or educational opportunities in the context of their work environment through several cycles of development, practice, sharing and reflection. Participants continue to build knowledge of ocean and climate science and communications and cultural sciences throughout the Study Circle, and gain resources and materials to train staff, volunteers, and other audiences at their home institutions.

The Study Circle has two major phases. During the first six months participants engage in a formal, facilitated learning process. Upon graduating participants join the larger network of colleagues and continue to experiment, evaluate and share successes from their work with each other. Through the Study Circle, participants will learn about the latest findings in climate science and oceanography and how to apply these to interpretive contexts in their home institutions. In addition participants build trust and lasting bonds among colleagues from multiple institutions who share an interest in developing effective ways to engage audiences in learning about climate and ocean change.

Who is the Study Circle for?
The Study Circle is intended for pairs of staff members from informal learning centers such as zoos, aquariums, science centers, National Parks, natural preserves, and other institutions that have an interest in coastal or ocean issues.

Costs and Compensation:
NNOCCI will pay for direct costs1 for participation in Study Circle activities that are not also part of participants' routine work. This includes travel, lodging and food for in-person meetings. NNOCCI will also provide a $3,000 stipend2 to up to 10 institutions which support two staff members to participate in the Study Circle.

Key Criteria:
Applicants should have institutional support before they apply. The institution should meet the following criteria:

  • Have an ocean or coastal ecology  connection within their work.
  • Have regular interpretation programming led by staff and/or volunteers.
  • Have interest in addressing issues related to climate change.
  • Be willing to support two staff members to fully participate in both the learning and evaluation phases of the Study Circle. Each applicant must fill out their own separate application.
  • Be willing to support NNOCCI’s evaluation efforts, which will entail an onsite visitor survey that the two staff members or volunteers will collect after presentations or other education programming. This survey effort will take place twice: 1) in the months immediately before the Study Circle meetings, and 2) six months after the training is complete.

Criteria for individual participants:

  • Able to commit to 3 in-person meetings (see dates, below) and about 3 hours/week of Study Circle work from approximately August 2015 through December 2015.
  • Able to commit to coordinating one-page visitor impact surveys at your institution several months prior to the first Study Circle and in the six months following the last Study Circle meeting.
  • Have regular opportunities to apply information and learning from the Study Circle through professional responsibilities such as interpretation for visitors, written communications, educational programming or presenting training for colleagues or volunteer interpreters.
  • Have supervisor support for full participation in the Study Circle.
  • Have a colleague who meets all of the criteria above as a co-applicant.

In Person Meeting Dates:*

Study Circle 'A'

  • September 16 and 17, 2015 (Boston, MA)
  • October 28 and 29, 2015 (Woods Hole, MA)
  • December 2 and 3, 2015 (location to be announced)

Study Circle 'B'

  • September 23 and 24, 2015 (Boston, MA)
  • November 4 and 5, 2015 (Woods Hole, MA)
  • December 9 and 10, 2015 (location to be announced)

*Please note that we are offering two distinct study circle options for Fall 2015. You and your partner must commit to the same study circle dates. If these dates do not fit for you and your institution, please note that additional Study Circles are being planned for and Spring and Fall 2016. 

How to apply:

Both applicants from an institution should submit a separate application. Click here to fill out the online application. Application deadline is Monday, March 16, 2015.

Please email nnocci@neaq.org with questions or concerns.

The GLOBE Surface Temperature Train-the-Trainer workshop will be held on Friday, April 12, 2013 at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA. Trainers, Partners, and Teachers certified in Surf Temp are invited to attend a FREE Surface Temperature training by Master Trainer & Lead Scientist for this protocol, Dr. Kevin Czajkowski.

Pages