Are you apprehensive teaching about climate change? Not sure what to believe after reading different headlines and hearing controversies? ClimateChangeLIVE will help you sort it out for yourself and be confident in educating your students about this important topic! This webinar will be presented by education specialists from three federal agencies immersed in climate change research and issues. We’ll be joined by EPA’s 2012 Climate Communicator of the Year, the Alliance for Climate Education (ACE). ACE will share tips about how to engage your students, and how your class can be part of the solution, addressing climate change head-on. We’ll feature highlights of materials focused on the process of science, how to judge whether what you’re reading is good science, as well as misconceptions about climate change. The Department of Energy will highlight the Energy Literacy Framework, which identifies the Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts one would understand to be energy and climate literate.

Presenters: U.S. Forest Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Dept. of Energy, Alliance for Climate Education

The third National Climate Assessment (NCA) report, released May 6, 2014, is the most comprehensive look at climate change impacts in the United States to date. Based on years of work by hundreds of diverse experts, the NCA (http://nca2014.globalchange.gov/) confirms that climate change is affecting us – and the natural resources we rely on – right now. Join authors of NCA chapters on Ecosystems, Forests, and Adaptation together with representatives from the U.S. Global Change Research Program and the NCA Indicator System to discuss key findings and implications for managers.

 The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Wildlife Federation have developed a series of web conferences to increase communication and transfer of technical information between conservation professionals regarding the increasing challenges from climate change. This program is being facilitated by the USFWS's National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) Applied Landscape Conservation Team.

A partnership between the National Wildlife Federation and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Monday, May 18, at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

The peoples, lands, and resources of indigenous communities in the United States, including Alaska and the Pacific Rim, face an array of challenges, many of which are exacerbated by climate change impacts. As one of the most marginalized demographics, the consequences of observed and projected climate change are already dramatically impacting Indigenous ways of life that have persisted for thousands of years. Both the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the Third National Climate Assessment acknowledge that the greatest opportunities for mitigating and adapting to climate impacts must include indigenous knowledge and perspectives.

This webinar will focus on the key findings from the Third National Climate Assessment emphasising findings from the chapter on Indigenous Peoples, Lands and Resources. Presentations will include discussions on access to traditional food, decreases in water quality and quantity and sea ice, and relocation of Native communities brought on by changing climate conditions.

Our Featured Presenters will include:

Following the webinar, there will be an informal discussion of the topics presented. All attendees are invited to participate. There are limited spaces for this discussion, information on joining will be provided during the event.

Please share this opportunity will all interested colleagues and Networks.

 
Important Information for participating in this Webinar. 

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting at the start time.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting using VOIP, dial +1 (415) 655-0059 for audio. The access code is: 539-911-382. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to:http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 110-978-691

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

 

ClimateChangeLIVE distance learning adventure, brings you a wealth of climate change education resources and programs from 17 Federal agencies and non-profit organizations! We offer educators, a source of trusted, science-based materials, which are correlated to science education standards. 

This webinar will highlight climate change education resources and programs from three of our partners. NOAA has a wealth of climate change education resources and programs to share with you. Learn about citizen science opportunities from Project Budburst. The Department of Energy will share the BITES (Buildings Industry Technology Electricity Scenarios) Tool which students can use to make policy changes in the four sectors and run scenarios to see how their changes impact CO2 output as well as primary energy source dependence. DOE will also highlight a variety of reliable sources of information related to energy concepts and data.

Presenters: Dept. of Energy, Project Budburst, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Time: 3:30 p.m. ET / 2:30 p.m. CT / 1:30 p.m. MT / 12:30 p.m. PT

One of the key needs for successful implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards are resources that are well-aligned to the standards. The Educators Evaluating the Quality of Instructional Products (EQuIP) Rubric for science provides criteria by which to measure the alignment and overall quality of lessons and units with respect to the NGSS. The rubric is an effective tool that enables teachers and administrators, in teams or individually, to review existing instructional materials to determine what revisions are needed, provide constructive criterion-based feedback to developers, and identify exemplars/models for teachers' use within and across states. Register today!

The web seminar will provide guidance on:

  • the key attributes resources should have to meet the letter and spirit of NGSS
  • the structure and features of the rubric
  • using the rubric to select and supplement curriculum resources

Details

Title: Evaluating Resources for NGSS: The EQuIP Rubric
Target audience: Educators of grades K-12
Dates: Tuesday, July 29, 2014
Time: 3:30 p.m. ET / 2:30 p.m. CT / 1:30 p.m. MT / 12:30 p.m. PT
Duration: 90 minutes
Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenters: Brian J. Reiser and Joe Krajcik

7:30 pm Eastern Time

The NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project is honored to present Dr. John Holdren, Assistant to the President for Science and Technology and Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and Dr. Richard Spinrad, NOAA Chief Scientist as the featured speakers for our June, 2015 national webinar.

Dr. Holdren will discuss U.S. efforts to cut carbon pollution, prepare for climate impacts, and lead internationally through the President’s Climate Action Plan. He will describe how the Climate Action Plan is advancing science, including actionable information and tools useful to educators, to enhance understanding and awareness of climate risks and impacts. Dr. Holdren will also discuss the Office of Science & Technology Policy’s Climate Education and Literacy Initiative, an opportunity to advance collaboration on climate education, both inside and outside of government. Effective climate action depends on climate-literate students, citizens, and decision makers to develop and implement solutions. 

Dr. Spinrad will speak on citizen science and how it can be a valuable tool for science educators to help students connect with science as a constant and intimate part of their lives. That benefit reaches beyond formal and informal learning. Today, scientists and policy makers recognize the impact and unique value of doing citizen science “in our own backyards” to advancing our scientific understanding of climate change and the risks associated with it. Dr. Spinrad will further focus on the role of citizen science in developing climate indicators, and how this effort and your input will help us connect the dots between data and resilience in our communities nationwide.

Space is limited. Reserve Your Spot at:

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar

Please share this opportunity will all interested colleagues and Networks. 

Important Information for participating in this Webinar. Seriously, read the following and save it for reference:

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting at the start time.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting using VOIP, dial +1 (562) 247-8421 for audio. The access code is: 316-091-230. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 158-550-003

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

To join our email list and receive information on upcoming webinars, book club meetings, and access to archives, send an email tobruce.moravchik@noaa.gov. In the subject line type "Join The Climate Stewards Education Community”  

 

ClimateChangeLIVE distance learning adventure, brings you a wealth of climate change education resources and programs from 17 Federal agencies and non-profit organizations! We offer educators, a source of trusted, science-based materials, which are correlated to science education standards. This webinar highlights climate change education resources from three of our partners. Project Learning Tree and the U.S. Forest Service will introduce their GreenSchools! program and how you can foster student-led efforts to move your school toward sustainability. The Forest Service will highlight the Natural Inquirer science education journal’s Climate Collection which takes real-life Forest Service research, and engages students in the science inquiry method, along with activities tied to the research.

Presenters: Project Learning Tree, U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

Did you know that there are at least several hundred tiny particles in one cubic centimeter of air? Did you know that there is “good” ozone and “bad” ozone? We’ll explore what’s in the air we breathe; how and why scientists measure air pollution, and the growing popularity of citizen science. You will learn a fun hands-on activity for students to build their own monitor using the latest micro sensors. These air sensor kits measure particle pollution (commonly known as dust) and turn on light bulbs based on the level in the atmosphere. 

Details

Target audience: K-12 teachers
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenter: Dr. Gayle Hagler

 

Preparing for or responding to an environmental disasters requires knowledge from many disciplines and real time interdisciplinary problem solving. The interaction between the extreme event, people in its path and the response mechanisms of government and business combine at one place and time. How do we prepare students for careers where they can make useful and valuable contributions that mitigate risks and increase resilience in the face of a growing population and changing environment? What do students need to know about risk and resilience? What foundational knowledge will prepare them to communicate with, learn from, and work with experts from the range of disciplines that are needed to address these problems?

This workshop will bring together educators from the variety of disciplines that prepare students to address natural disasters with those currently engaged in addressing these challenges. Focusing on three case studies, we will share best practices in education to help students to understand needs of different stakeholders and to prepare students for careers related to hazard mitigation and adaptation. We will consider how partnerships among academia, civil society, and the business community will enhance both student learning and community preparedness. We will identify needs for curricular resources and discuss how to meet these needs.

This workshop is open to 30 faculty (by application) and there is no registration fee to attend. Participation for non-academics is by invitation. Workshop stipends are available to help defray travel expenses in cases of financial need. Accepted participants are expected to contribute teaching materials to a new web-based collection devoted to teaching about risk and resilience across the disciplines.

Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

The energy we use to heat and light our homes, drive to work and school and watch our favorite television show can come from a variety of traditional and renewable energy sources -- crude oil, natural gas, wind farms, hydroelectric power and coal-fired power plants. But how do we understand the costs and benefits of the energy choices we make? What happens if the mix of energy sources changes in the future? What does this all mean for our climate, air, water, and overall environmental quality? Learn about the scientific tools EPA scientists are developing to help states, communities and Tribes make decisions about energy use now and in the future. Explore an interactive board game developed by EPA scientists called Generate! that explores energy choices and the environment and gets students “energized” in some friendly competition.

Details

Target audience: K-12 teachers
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenter: Dr. Rebecca Dodder

Pages