This map shows the pattern of thermohaline circulation. This collection of currents is responsible for the large-scale exchange of water masses in the ocean, including providing oxygen to the deep ocean. The entire circulation pattern takes ~2000 years.

This is a teaching activity in which students learn about the connection between CO2 emissionS, CO2 concentration, and average global temperatures. Through a simple online model, students learn about the relationship between these and learn about climate modeling while predicting temperature change over the 21st century.

In this lesson, students examine and interpret varied observational datasets and are asked to determine whether the data supports or does not support the statement: climate change is occurring in Colorado.

This video describes the foundation Plant for the Planet, a foundation created by a 9-year-old German boy, Felix. This foundation has planted more than 500,000 trees in Germany, which he says help sequester carbon and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The student rallies, first his community and then other children, to plant millions of trees to offset our energy-use emissions.

This figure, the famous Keeling Curve, shows the history of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations as directly measured at Mauna Loa, Hawaii. This curve is an essential piece of evidence that shows the increased greenhouse gases that cause recent increases in global temperatures.

This is the ninth and final lesson in a series of lessons about climate change. This lesson focuses on the various activities that humans can do to mitigate the effects of climate change. This includes information on current and predicted CO2 emission scenarios across the globe, alternative energy sources, and how people are currently responding to climate change. Importantly, this lesson is motivating in showing students that they can make a difference.

 

Turn on your teaching with the 2013 Summer Institute for Energy Education. Made possible by generous support from MN Center for Energy and the Environment.

 

Whether you teach STEM, art or anything in between, energy efficiency, conservation and renewables are present and future solutions that can be integrated into your school and teaching.

Every participant has the opportunity to earn CEU credits and graduate credits from Hamline University.

 

Dive into the classroom and outdoor components of the Will Steger Foundation's Minnesota's Changing Climate (MCC) curriculum. 

This program will serve to meet your needs as a professional classroom or outdoor educator - whether you are experienced with MCC or just starting out. As climate change impacts can be seen and experienced right here in Minnesota, our students need to be literate in climate sciences to be the leaders of change and solutions tomorrow.

Every participant has the opportunity to earn CEU credits and graduate credits from Hamline University.

Learn to teach basic climate science and empower your students to take action. Practice teaching the carbon cycle, investigate "garbology," and develop simple student action projects. Content is focused on grades five to eight.

Location: Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, CA

 

Looking for fun, hands-on activities to engage your visitors, students and community on the topic of climate change?  Come to the New England Aquarium for a FREE training about these activities and climate change education. 

This training is ideal for classroom teachers and informal educators from various institutions hoping to engage students and adults around the topic of climate change. 

Pages