This video features interviews with native people living on atoll islands in Micronesia, so viewers are able to understand the real, current threats that these people are facing due to climate change.

This video describes the role that dendrochronology plays in understanding climate change, especially changes to high elevation environments at an upper tree line. Dendrochronologists from the Big Sky Institute sample living and dead trees, describe how correlations between trees are made, and explain how tree cores record climate changes.

This in-depth interactive slideshow about how climate models work is embedded with a lot of background information. It also describes some of the projected climate change impacts to key sectors such as water, ecosystems, food, coasts, health. (scroll down page for interactive)

In this experiment, students will observe a natural process that removes carbon dioxide (CO2) from Earth's atmosphere. This process is a part of the carbon cycle and results in temperature suitable for life. Students will learn that the carbon cycle is a fundamental Earth process. Throughout Earth's history, the balance of carbon has kept the atmosphere's carbon dioxide (CO2) and Earth's temperature within relatively narrow ranges.

In this interactive, students explore, at their own pace, how global climate change may affect health issues. Issues include airborne diseases, developmental disorders, mental health disorders, vector-borne diseases and waterborne diseases.

This animation depicts global surface warming as simulated by NCAR's Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Version 3. It shows the temperature anomalies relative to the end of the 19th century (1870-1899), both over the entire globe and as a global average. The model shows the temporary cooling effects during the 5 major volcanic eruptions of this time period, and then the model's estimates of warming under the different scenarios taken from the fourth IPCC report.

7:00pm ET/4:00pm PT

Scientists from two NASA Earth science missions will address how their synergistic research helps us to understand Earth’s water cycle, including extreme events such as floods. This presentation will use an online concept map tool for exploring the water cycle. Unlike traditional slide-based presentations, these dynamic maps act as a resource that can be explored with an audience, instead of a one-way, linear presentation. The concept maps presented are loaded with educational assets – including images, videos, news items – that webinar participants can use in their own educational practices, presentations or for their own learning. The concept maps and other materials presented are freely available online, and instructions will be provided to give participants access to the maps after the webinars. Participants will also learn how to create their own maps.

Presenters:

Jorge Vazquez, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
J.T. Reager, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Annette deCharon, University of Maine
Carla Companion, University of Maine

About the Presenters:

JT Reager is a research scientist in the Water and Carbon cycles group at Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He received Bachelors degrees in Aerospace Engineering and Ocean Engineering from Virginia Tech, a masters degree in Physical Oceanography from the University of Delaware, and a Ph.D in Earth System Science from the University of California, Irvine. He is currently using gravity-based observations of water movement across the planet from NASA’s GRACE mission to study flood and drought occurence and to measure the strength of the global water cycle. He’s interested in modeling and remote sensing of the Earth system, and implications for society and natural resources management.

Jorge Vazquez is the NASA Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) scientist supporting Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Surface Salinity. He received his Bachelor of Science in Physics from the University of Miami, his masters degree in Oceanography from the university of Rhode Island and his Ph.D in geological sciences from the University of Southern California. He currently serves as the chair of the Applications and User Services Technical Advisory Group for the Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST). His research interests include applying high resolution SST data to understand better coastal dynamics. Outside interests include biking, hiking and tennis as well as serving the community through his Rotary Club.

Annette deCharon has leveraged her background in earth and ocean sciences into extensive experience in designing, implementing and maintaining online tools and content. She and her team currently manage the NASA Aquarius, Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE.net), and COSEE Ocean Systems websites. They have also conducted 56 webinars using their own concept-mapping software, which was developed to bridge ocean resources with effective education practice. These webinars have reached 2112 people in 48 U.S. states/territories and 28 non-U.S. countries.

Carla Companion is a research associate at the University of Maine (Umaine) working on many different grant-funded projects – including work with the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE) Ocean Systems, NASA Aquarius and SPURS missions, and the Ocean Observatories Initiative. Prior to joining the UMaine School of Marine Sciences, she earned her MS in Environmental Studies/Environmental Education from Antioch University New England and her B.S. in Marine and Freshwater Biology from the University of New Hampshire. In addition to helping run Scientist-Educator Collaborative workshops and other projects, she has helps to facilitate webinars featuring ocean scientists and to inform development of concept mapping ​software.

In this web seminar we will explore the use of computer models for generating projections about the future of Earth's climate. The presenters will demonstrate the Very, Very Simple Climate Model—free educational software that enables students to try out "what if" scenarios about changes to our planet's climate during the coming century. Participating educators will learn about the scientific basis of this simple model, derived from observations (ice core data) of past climates during recent ice ages.

Register today!

Presenters: Scott Denning and Randy Russell

This event is a Google Hangout and will be broadcast live on YouTube. Questions may be submitted during the Hangout using the comments section or via Twitter –use  #AskNICE

The AskNICE Professional Development events occurs every month on the third Thursday of the month from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM Eastern Time (US & Canada). Effective 11/21/2013 until 3/20/2014.  

Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

What's the latest in Antarctic paleo-climate research? This web seminar, targeting educators of students in grades 7-12, will introduce participants to the nation's newest ice core expedition… SPICE Core! Investigators seeking data from the past 40,000 years are drilling a 1500 meter ice core to study chemical isotopes, tiny particles called aerosols and atmospheric gases trapped in earth's great southern ice sheet. The goal is to investigate environmental change since the last glacial/interglacial transition. Why was the South Pole targeted? What criteria affect the specific site selection for drilling? What new kinds of technology were required? Dr. T.J. Fudge will answer your questions, and share what it's like to work in the Pole's extreme environment. Register today!

A related, video-enhanced educational activity, focusing on "Polar Science and Engineering", will be presented by Linda Morris for you to share with your students. The interactions modeled in the video between scientists and engineers will serve as the basis of a reflective activity, Drilling Back Through Time, that introduce the students in your classroom to the NGSS's "Scientific and Engineering Practices". Educational resources from the US Ice Drilling Program will be showcased.

Details

Title: SPICE Core: Investigating Past Climate at the South Pole
Target audience: Educators of students in grades 7-12
Date: Wednesday, December 10, 2014 
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenters: Dr. T. J. Fudge and Linda M. Morris

Underwritten by the U.S. Ice Drilling Program Office and the National Science Foundation
 

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