Wednesday, April 30th, 2014 2pm ET/11am PT
 
How will climate change affect our communities? How can we evaluate news stories about the effects of climate change in your area? What can you do to reach out to your local media and educators, to encourage them to explore the local impacts of climate change? 

The National Climate Assessment can help. 

This report from the US government—due the week of May 6th—evaluates, integrates and assesses observed and projected impacts of climate change across the country, examining how climate change will affect different communities and regions. It will be a tremendous resource for teachers, for parents, and for anyone trying to connect global climate change to local concerns 

To learn how we can make the best use of this tool, join us for a discussion with a panel of climate change specialists. These specialists will address how you can use the report to learn how climate change is already affecting your community, and how teachers can use the report to bring climate change into classrooms. 

Panelists will include: Emily Cloyd, Public Participation and Engagement Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment at USGCRP, the federal agency developing the National Climate Assessment; Paige Knappenberger, media relations associate at Climate Nexus, who tracks media coverage and helps communities connect with media outlets to address climate change; Amanda Rycerz, research officer at Habitat 7, website developers of for NCA. Moderator Minda Berbeco is a Programs and Policy Director at NCSE specializing in climate change, working with parents and educators to support the good teaching of climate change science in public schools.

 

NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project (CSEP) is collaborating with Federal, State and NGO partners to convene four climate-science workshops for formal and informal educators. Participants will hear from and interact with climate science, education and communication experts, and visit research facilities to explore foundational technologies and innovations in Earth-system research. This workshop in Seattle, Washington will focus on the region and topical impacts of climate change, with a goal of connecting educators and their students/audiences to the best-available, science-based information and resources about climate change.

Registration for the Seattle, Washington workshop is open, however there are attendance limits for the workshop, and we are advertising them nationally.  Availability will be on a first come first serve basis, so register early for your workshop. Participation in the workshops is free, but attendees are responsible for arranging their own transportation, lodging and meals unless otherwise indicated in workshop details.  

All attendees will receive a certificate acknowledging their participation in the workshop as well as the number of professional development hours they have engaged in.  

Below are the location, dates, locations, and attendance limits for the upcoming workshop. Registration forms will be shut down when registration for that workshop has reached capacity. You will receive an email confirming your participation in the workshop. The capacity for this workshop is 40 Participants.

Important Note: If you are a foreign national and wish to attend the workshops in Seattle, WA you MUST send an email to the lead contact for that workshop: Lisa Hiruki-Raring, Lisa.Hiruki-Raring@noaa.gov

 

Climate Education Workshop Detailed Information

Seattle, Washington

Dates & Times: Thursday and Friday, April 23rd and 24th, 2015. 8:30am - 5:00pm

 

Place: NOAA Western Regional Center, Building 9

7600 Sand Point Way NE

Seattle, WA 98115

 

Important Note: If you are a foreign national and wish to attend this workshop, you MUST note it in your registration and send an email to: Lisa Hiruki-Raring, Lisa.Hiruki-Raring@noaa.gov

 

Contacts:  

Lisa Hiruki-Raring, Lisa.Hiruki-Raring@noaa.gov

Peg Steffen, Peg.Steffen@noaa.gov

Molly Harrison, Molly.Harrison@noaa.gov

 

Featured Presentations

  • Ocean Acidification - What We Know & How We Know It. 
  • The Past and Present Climate of the Pacific Northwest.
  • Climate Change Impacts on Ice-Associated Seals in Alaska 
  • Ways to Engage Audiences and Inspire Local Action to Address Ocean Acidification. 
  • Pacific Northwest Climate Change: Impacts and Implications. 
  • Western Water Resources, Climate, and Science. 
  • Salmon Flexibility Put to the Test by Climate Change. 

 

Featured Activities 

  • Fisheries and Ocean Acidification
  • Polar Detectives
  • Climate Change Impacts on Ice-Associated Seals.
  • Tours:

    • NOAA’s National Weather Service Forecast Office
    • NOAA’s Marine Mammal Research Bone Collection
    • NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory’s Engineering Department

 

Notes - Workshop Costs, Food & Lodging:

  • There is no cost to attend this workshop.
  • Participants must make their own travel and overnight arrangements.
  • A nearby lodging option is The Silver Cloud Inn - University District (http://www.silvercloud.com/university/) 5036 25 Avenue NE, Seattle, WA 98105. Ph: 206.526.5200, 800.205.6940. If there are enough workshop participants staying at this hotel, there may be an option for free shuttle service to/from the NOAA Sand Point Campus.
  • Meals will not be provided, but there is an easily accessible cafeteria as well as vending machines on the NOAA Campus where the workshop will be held.

 

For questions concerning the workshop including location and program questions, contact the workshop lead: Lisa Hiruki-Raring, Lisa.Hiruki-Raring@noaa.gov

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This workshop is part of the White House Climate Education and Literacy Initiative

Looking for fun, hands-on activities to engage your visitors, students and community on the topic of climate change?  Come to the New England Aquarium for a FREE training about these activities and climate change education. 

This training is ideal for classroom teachers and informal educators from various institutions hoping to engage students and adults around the topic of climate change. 

Monday, May 5, 2014 at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

The main presentation this month will be given by Jerry Meehl, a senior scientist in the University Center for Atmospheric Research's (UCAR) Climate and Global Dynamics Division. Jerry  will talk about the processes involved in producing the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report as well as the National Climate Assessment (NCA).
  
A second presentation will be given by Mindy Berbeco, the Programs and Policy Director at the National Center for Science Education will further discuss the NCA, NCAnet - A group of organizations working with the National Climate Assessment to engage producers and users of climate science and impacts information across the United States, and their efforts to involve educators in unpacking the teachable moments from the report, and how you can become involved and have an impact on a nation-wide scale.

Join us on Monday, April 13th at 7:30 PM Eastern Time

There is increasing recognition of the significance of how Traditional Environmental Knowledge (TEK) can inform our understanding of the impacts of climate change and strategies for adaptation and mitigation. Indigenous people bring a collective knowledge of the land, sky and sea and provide a crucial foundation for community-based adaptation and mitigation. Indigenous knowledge has been long recognized as a key source of information and insight in domains such as forestry, traditional medicine, biodiversity conservation, resource management, impact assessment, and natural disaster preparedness and response. 
 
NOAA’s Climate Stewards Education Project is honored collaborate with Cultural Specialists from the Smithsonian Museum of the American Indian, Project Indigenous, and Educators from the University of Wisconsin-Extension to present this webinar on TEK, how it can inform our understanding of a changing climate's impacts on coastal and inland Indigenous people, and useful teaching materials to bring these ideas together. 
  • Dennis Zotigh, Kiowa, San Juan Pueblo and Santee Dakota, Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, will provide an opening song. 
  • Scott Frazier, Crow/Santee, Project Indigenous, will discuss climate change impacts on sacred sites/sacred places, and what TEK can offer in adapting to climate change impacts. 
  • Albert “Abby” Ybarra, Yaqui-Tohono O'Odham, Project Indigenous, will present Three Sisters Gardening, an ancient method of farming and how it can be used to connect youth to the earth, annual cycles of growth, and climate change. 
  • Cathy Techmann, University of Wisconsin-Extension, will present G-WOW “Gikinoo’wizhiwe Onji Waaban” (Guiding for Tomorrow), a climate service learning initiative integrating climate change research, TEK, and place-based evidence of climate change impacts on traditional Ojibwe lifeways to provide knowledge about what can be done to mitigate or adapt to a changing climate for people of all culture

Following the webinar, there will be an informal discussion of the topics presented. All attendees are invited to participate. There are limited spaces for this discussion, information on joining will be provided during the event.

Please share this opportunity will all interested colleagues and Networks.

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar

Important Information for participating in this Webinar. Seriously, read the following and save it for reference:

  • Log into the webinar at least 5 minutes before the scheduled start time. GoToWebinar continually upgrades their software. We want to be sure you can access the meeting at the start time.
  • Plan to use the VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) option for this presentation. All participants will be muted during the duration of the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty connecting using VOIP, dial +1 (415) 655-0059 for audio. The access code is: 926-695-389. You will be charged for this call. No Audio Pin is needed to listen to the webinar.
  • If you have difficulty logging in to the webinar go to: http://support.citrixonline.com/en_US/Webinar/contact?question=l The ID Number for this Webinar is: 126-553-435

For more information on NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Project go to: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

 

July 31 to August 1- ONLINE SESSIONS
August 5-6 - SESSIONS at NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Columbia University in New York City 
Graduate Credit Option: University of Michigan-Flint
 
Climate Change in the Classroom is a professional development event for 8th – 12th grade English, Math, Science and Social Studies teachers. The workshop sponsors, GISS, Columbia University, the Science Museum of Minnesota, University of Michigan-Flint, Real World Matters and Mindblue Productions, invite teachers to explore the science underlying global climate change in today's headlines with researchers on the frontlines of advancing knowledge.  A special focus will be developing climate literacy to evaluate energy solutions for mitigating global climate change.  Guided by education faculty, teachers will pilot a new curriculum - Hot: One World, One Climate. CCIC will involve teachers in a learning experience that will deepen understanding about how students learn science, build strategies for using climate change topics as a context for science and math instruction, and facilitate student learning through problem-solving, inquiry and an engaging role-play simulation.            
 
Learn More and Apply @ http://www.giss.nasa.gov/meetings/

May 29th, 2014 12:00 to 1:00 PM ET

Climate change in the Great Lakes region and beyond is expected to promote shifts in the ranges and phenology of well-known plant and animal species. These shifts are often a result of changes in the availability of food and shelter, as well as temperature. Knowing more about these potential impacts will help wildlife managers and nature enthusiasts alike to adapt to and potentially mitigate some of the resulting changes in wildlife diversity.

This webinar will cover:

  • an overview of potential climate change impacts on wildlife
  • effects of a changing climate on the phenology of migratory birds
  • impacts of shifting climate conditions (such as drought and flooding) on the vulnerability of species of special concern
  • climate change effects on Broad-tailed Hummingbirds as a result of shifts in the timing of flowering of their nectar flowers glacier lily, dwarf larkspur, and Indian paintbrush, which they rely on during spring migration

The webinar is free. To register click here. Once registered, you will receive a confirmation email with log-in information.

 

Agenda

Welcome and Introduction: Jill Jentes Banicki, Ohio Sea Grant

Assessing the Vulnerability of Wildlife to Climate Change: Benjamin Zuckerberg, Dept of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, UW-Madison

Climate Change Effects on Broad-tailed Hummingbirds: Amy Iler, Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Maryland and The Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory

Question/Answer and Wrap Up

Discussion: Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions via a live chat after the presentation.

 

Visit changingclimate.osu.edu to view previous webinars and other climate resources.

On April 22, 2015 please join us for a live webinar showcasing The Wild Center’s Youth Climate Summit — designed by and for high school students. The Association of Science-Technology Centers (ASTC) and The Wild Center have teamed up to share a successful Youth Climate Summit format designed to engage high school students in climate literacy through meaningful dialogue and action planning on climate change. We will highlight this program through a two-hour webinar that will provide an overview of the Youth Climate Summit concept, impacts and outcomes for schools and students, and the planning resources available for free through our Youth Climate Summit Toolkit. Project Director Jen Kretser along with two summit students — Erin Weaver and Meadow Hackett — will be sharing their experiences.

Encouraged by US government leaders and interest by other science centers, our collective goal is to share this convening program format at no cost and support the development of at least 10 Youth Climate Summits across the international science museum community in 2015. We will offer all the organizational tools you will need along with connections to scientific experts in your region.

Climate literacy education continues to be an urgent issue and this program format allows for informal science institutions such as science centers, zoos, aquariums, and non-profits to join in the international effort. Youth Climate Summits have been found to be powerful vehicles for inspiration, learning, community engagement, and youth leadership development. Climate literacy with a focus on local climate impacts and solutions is a key component of the Youth Climate Summit. The project-based learning surrounding the creation of a unique, student driven, sustainability and Climate Action Plan promotes leadership skills applicable to and the tools necessary for a 21st Century workforce. This effort was highlighted as a commitment in support of theWhite House Office of Science & Technology Policy’s Climate Education and Literacy Initiative, with the goal of connecting American students and citizens with the best-available, science-based information about climate change. The meeting is being hosted by the Department of Energy office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy as part of their efforts to support Climate and Energy Literacy.

The Youth Climate Summit Toolkit can be accessed here.

This short video provides an overview of the Adirondack Youth Climate Summit.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE:

Wednesday, April 22
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET
Youth Climate Summit

Please join the webinar from your computer, tablet, or smartphone here:https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/327254349

You can also dial in using your phone:
   United States – +1 (872) 240-3312
   Access Code: 327-254-349

For anyone in the Washington DC area, we invite you to attend in person at the US Department of Energy. Please RSVP to:
Joshua Sneideman, Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow
Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
202-586-5695
joshua.sneideman@ee.doe.gov

Learn about integrating climate change education into your classroom or informal education programming, get an introduction to regionally relevant climate science, and hear about how other educators have used these materials. The webinar will be presented by educators who have used the resources in their own teaching, both in the classroom and in place-based education.

Certificates of attendance for professional development contact hours can be requested after the webinar; instructions will be provided during the session.

The presentation will cover:

  • Ohio Sea Grant’s updated Great Lakes Climate Change Curriculum
  • climate and Great Lakes literacy principles
  • informal resources to supplement and expand lesson plans

Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT

Join NSTA for this web seminar on July 10 and learn how the Learning Center—NSTA's e-PD portal with over 11,600 resources, a community of like-minded individuals, and professional learning tools—can help you enhance and extend your content and pedagogical knowledge of Earth and Space Science science topics.Register today!

 

This program is designed for educators of grades K-12. The seminar's discussion will focus on resources related to the topics of Earth, Sun, and Moon and the The Solar System. An archive and related PowerPoint presentation will be available at the end of the program.

Details

Title: Enhance Your Content and Pedagogical Knowledge Using NSTA Resources: Earth and Space Science
Target audience: K - 12 teachers
Date: Thursday, July 10, 2014
Time: 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT / 4:30 p.m. MT / 3:30 p.m. PT
Duration: 90 minutes Note: New users should log in 15 minutes prior to the scheduled start time for an introduction to NSTA web seminars.
Presenter: Don Boonstra

This webinar is underwritten by the GE Foundation.  NOAA is a Content Collaborator of NSTA's Learning Center



 

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