Session topics focus on sharing tested models and strategies for effectively teaching this topic in undergraduate courses. Each participant will contribute tested teaching materials and strategies and participate in the development and review of classroom resources that take advantage of cutting edge technology and pedagogy.

Application deadline - March 1, 2013

In this webinar, Climate Change LIVE partners highlight professional development programs to empower you as a climate change educator!  Each program offers training to increase your understanding of essential climate concepts and provide you with the tools and resources to implement a science-based climate change curriculum in your classroom and connect with networks of other educators teaching about climate change.  Most of these programs offer grants to schools to help them implement climate change solution-related action projects, and include on-site and online training opportunities.

Presenters: Will Steger Foundation, NOAA, Alliance for Climate Education, ACE 

The Climate Leader is an online training in systems thinking to help fuel the global response to climate change. These materials will help you to be more effective at addressing climate change by enabling you to see the interconnections and big picture in your work.

Climate Interactive launched The Climate Leader, a free five-week online training series in systems thinking designed for people working to address climate change. Sign up now at: http://climateinteractive.org/the-climate-leader/

This online course will share some time-tested insights into navigating the complex world of taking action on climate. Included will be video lessons offering some practical and proven approaches for leading in complexity, being strategic, and drawing on both your own rational brilliance and your own deep intuitive instincts through systems thinking.
 
Join more than 2,000 other Climate Leaders for this training: http://climateinteractive.org/the-climate-leader/
 
When you sign up, you will begin receiving the series of lessons via email. There will also be opportunities to participate in exercises to deepen your understanding and connect with others participating in the course.
 
Behind the Climate Leader are decades of experience from the team at Climate Interactive and powerful ideas developed at MIT. Their cutting edge tools have been helping people see what works to respond to climate change. They’ve helped students, business leaders, activists, and UN negotiators determine the choices that will put us on a pathway to a healthy climate. Lessons will be led by Dr. Elizabeth Sawin and Drew Jones, co-directors of Climate Interactive, who will share their wealth of insights on systems thinking with you.
 
The Climate Leader goal is to help you be as intentional as possible, as bold as possible, and as visionary and clear as you can be. Through the eleven lessons, this course will help you answer questions like:
  • How can I best look at the big picture, and why is that so useful?
  • How do I identify places that will have the most impact?
  • How can my efforts best be amplified?
  • What are the root causes of the challenge I’m facing?

 

The course is free and you can sign up to begin at anytime. In return for what Climate Leader provides, they invite you to use what you can to make a difference, share what you like, and give us feedback.

The opportunities and pathways for careers in natural resources and sustainability areas are diverse and the conversation between employers and higher education is only just beginning. This workshop will focus on articulating the breadth of opportunities and identifying the knowledge and skills that are pathways to different types of employment.

Application Deadline: February 22, 2013

Experts from NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory, Dr. Stephanie Herring and Dr. Martin Hoerling, will join facilitators Dr. Anne Gold of CIRES and Deb Morrison of University Colorado Boulder.

Dr. Herring and Dr. Hoerling collaborated on the Explaining Extreme Events of 2012 From a Climate Perspective report, which resulted in their inclusion on Foreign Policy magazine's Top 100 Global Thinkers list.

In this interactive panel discussion, the scientists will discuss what characterizes an extreme weather event. They also will explore how scientists attribute single events or trends in extreme weather to climate change.

Join them for this self-paced online course (Massive Open Online Course, MOOC).  The course will run over 4.5 weeks requiring a total of 20-25 hours to complete, start date is April 1, 2015.

Why is water at the heart of so much conflict in the American West? How have major cities and extensive agricultural systems been able to thrive in the Western United States despite most of the region being either a desert or semi-desert environment? How will a warming climate affect the availability and use of water in a region populated by tens of millions of people?

Join us in exploring these and other questions as we combine an overview of the science behind water and climate in the Western US with a survey of the major legal, political, and cultural issues focused on this precious resource.

You will hear from over 15 experts in water management, policy, and research in the West. We will start with history, politics and culture of water development in the Western US (module 1) and hydrology, water demand and climate in the Western US (module 2) before we dive into a case study around the Colorado River Basin (module 3) and explore controversial water issues (module 4).

This course will include many resources for educators. Educators can earn professional development credit by signing up for an parallel two credit hours course at the cost of $140.

This course is free and open to the public.  Register now!

 

Anne Gold, Associate Scientist and Science Educator, CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

Eric Gordon, Managing Director of Western Water Assessment, CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

Consider joining MADE-CLEAR on a five-day professional development experience on climate change and its solutions led by experts in climate science and educational researchers. You will explore the science of climate change through activities, inquiry, and small group work on curriculum.  The Academy will be held at the University of Delaware’s Virden Center.

 

Dr. Kathleen Tierney, Director of the CU Boulder’s Natural Hazards Center and Dr. Kevin Trenberth from the Climate Analysis Section at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) will join facilitators Dr. Anne Gold of CIRES and Deb Morrison of University Colorado Boulder in an interactive panel discussion. 

These experts will discuss how scientists can forecast where extreme events will occur and their severity. They will cover what communities and governments  can do to increase resiliency to extreme weather events and how the scientific community can help prepare citizens and government. 

Wednesday, February 18th – 4:00pm PT/7:00pm ET

The National Climate Assessment, released in May of 2014, summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, touching on many disciplines: earth science, biology, human health, engineering, technology, economics, and policy. Explore the document with a lead NCA author, then learn about related educator resources with Minda Berbeco from the National Center for Science Education. Discover how to bring these resources into classroom lessons, engage students in data collection and analysis, share visualizations and citizen science projects. 

Focus this month will be on the Southwest region. Watch for additional regions to be featured in upcoming “Ask US” sessions.

What determines a planet's climate? In this web seminar, you will use NASA mission data collected from NASA satellites to show how we determine a planet’s climate. The featured lesson in this web seminar is Modeling Hot and Cold Planets from the Earth Climate Course. Students explore why extreme temperature differences exist between Earth and other planets in our solar system.

Register today!

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