In this activity students trace the sources of their electricity, heating and cooling, and other components of their energy use though the use of their family's utility bills and information from utility and government websites.

This short NASA video focuses on the Aquarius satellite, launched on June 10, 2011 to observe how variations in ocean salinity relate to climatic changes. By measuring salinity globally, Aquarius shows the ocean's role in climate change and climate's effects on ocean circulation.

This simplified animation of a geothermal power plant from the U.S. Department of Energy illustrates commonalities with traditional power-generating stations. While there are many types of geothermal power plants, this animation shows a generic plant.

In this video, several scientists identify and describe examples of increasing health problems that they believe are related to climate change.

This short video features the Alaska Lake Ice and Snow Observatory Network (ALISON project), a citizen science program in which 4th and 5th graders help scientists study the relationship between climate change and lake ice and snow conditions.

In this visualization students can explore North American fossil fuel CO2 emissions at very fine space and time scales. The data is provided by the Vulcan emissions data project, a NASA/DOE funded effort under the North American Carbon Program (NACP).

This video is part of the Climate Science in a Nutshell video series. This short video looks at the effects of climate change happening right now around the globe, including: more extreme weather events, droughts, forest fires, land use changes, altered ranges of disease-carrying insects, and the loss of some agricultural products. It concludes with a discussion of the differences among weather, climate variability and climate change.

This video segment features subsistence fishing and harvesting in the Northwest US. Segment was adapted from a student video produced at Northwest Indian College in Bellingham, Washington.

This video provides an overview of the Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems and its research on alternative fuel vehicles and why they have less impact than current fossil fuel-burning cars on the environment.

In this hands-on activity, students explore whether rooftop gardens are a viable option for combating the urban heat island effect. Guiding question is: Can rooftop gardens reduce the temperature inside and outside houses?

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