July 14-18, 2014 
University of Delaware, Virden Center 
Lewes, Delaware

 

Goals of the Climate Science Academy

With the National Science Foundation’s support, climate scientists, learning scientists, and educators are working together to embed climate change science into formal and informal education in Delaware and Maryland. As both states work to implement the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), MADE CLEAR is working at the cutting edge of curriculum alignment, professional content knowledge, assessment development, and implementation strategies. We anticipate that the Academy will be of particular interest to 8th grade science teachers in Delaware. From Maryland, we ask LEA science supervisors to identify a target grade level and form Academy teams that can bring climate change planning back to their LEA. From both states, we encourage the inclusion of informal educators on teacher teams.

While at the five-day Summer Program, your team will design and refine climate change curriculum and assessments under the framework of NGSS. The Summer Program and school year follow-up sessions will give you the opportunity to:

  • enhance your understanding of a range of climate science topics
  • appreciate how climate science involves science/engineering practices, cross-cutting concepts such as systems and energy, and literacy in science and technical subjects
  • collaborate in the design of assessments structured to support NGSS
  • develop a climate curriculum framework to be tested and further developed throughout the school year and a professional development plan to scale up the teaching of climate science across your LEA
  • gain access to a community of experts in climate science disciplines, in local impacts of climate change, and in learning sciences

The goal is to bring the science to you in a way that is meaningful, place-based, and employs best practices in climate science education. While you investigate the science of climate change through focused activities, we will provide opportunities for your team to build an implementation plan that will work for you.

 

Vicki Arthur will lead participants through a wide range of education resources from the U.S. Forest Service for teaching about climate change. Forest Service researchers have been observing and studying the effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems for over 30 years. Learn how your students can collect and enter tree data to quantify and put a dollar value on the services that your school yard trees provide.  Discover an interactive atlas where students can learn about computer modeling while observing the potential effects of different emissions scenarios on the ranges of birds and trees. 

Our Featured speaker is Dr. Richard Alley, Evan Pugh Professor of Geosciences and Associate of the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute at The Pennsylvania State University. He will be giving our main presentation Bungy Jumping off the Ice-Core Roller Coaster: Ice-Core Records of Global Warming and Abrupt Climate Change

Dr. Alley will discuss how ice cores provide remarkably accurate records of climate changes locally, regionally and globally. Ice-core records of ice age cycles contribute to our understanding that CO2 has been “the biggest control knob” of Earth’s overall climate, and thus that if we continue burning fossil fuels and releasing the CO2, we will have large impacts on climate. But, ice-core records also show how changes in ocean circulation have had large, rapid regional impacts. The existence of such abrupt climate changes contributes to our understanding that, if scientists are wrong about the influence of CO2 on climate, changes are likely to be more-damaging than expected rather than less-damaging. 

Please forward this invitation to all interested colleagues and networks

The third National Climate Assessment (NCA) report, released May 6, 2014, is the most comprehensive look at climate change impacts in the United States to date. Based on years of work by hundreds of diverse experts, the NCA (http://nca2014.globalchange.gov/) confirms that climate change is affecting us – and the natural resources we rely on – right now. Join authors of NCA chapters on Ecosystems, Forests, and Adaptation together with representatives from the U.S. Global Change Research Program and the NCA Indicator System to discuss key findings and implications for managers.

 The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Wildlife Federation have developed a series of web conferences to increase communication and transfer of technical information between conservation professionals regarding the increasing challenges from climate change. This program is being facilitated by the USFWS's National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) Applied Landscape Conservation Team.

A partnership between the National Wildlife Federation and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

In this web seminar we will explore the use of computer models for generating projections about the future of Earth's climate. The presenters will demonstrate the Very, Very Simple Climate Model—free educational software that enables students to try out "what if" scenarios about changes to our planet's climate during the coming century. Participating educators will learn about the scientific basis of this simple model, derived from observations (ice core data) of past climates during recent ice ages.

Register today!

Presenters: Scott Denning and Randy Russell

This e-workshop developed by the FrameWorks Institute in partnership with the New England Aquarium gives an introductory look at how interpreters can utilize Strategic Framing to more effectively communicate the ocean and climate change story with the public. If you are interested in learning more about how to use Strategic Framing at your institution consider applying to a NNOCCI Study Circle. See the New England Aquarium's partner page for more information.

This workshop functions best in a modern Web browser that supports HTML5. We recommend Google ChromeFireFoxSafari, or IE9.

Webinar 1: Tuesday, October 7 - 6:30 pm EST / 3:30 PST/ 12:30 HST (90 min)

Join us for the first of two webinars for an introduction to our newest NOAA Data in the Classroom curriculum module – Investigating Coral Bleaching Using Real Data. You'll hear from NOAA experts about coral bleaching and how scientists use remote sensing tools to study stresses on coral health. The NODE curriculum developers will introduce the new lesson plans and demonstrate how our unique scaffolding can help students develop skills to access and use online data.

The NOAA Data in the Classroom Project develops curriculum designed to help teachers and students use real scientific data to explore dynamic Earth processes and understand the impact of environmental events on a regional or global scale. Each curriculum module features easy-to-use curriculum materials and specially designed websites that enable students to access and use real data. Our newest curriculum module – Investigating Coral Bleaching Using Real Data – is being developed for grades 6-8.

  • Introduction to the NODE Project
  • Coral Bleaching 101 with NOAA Experts
  • Coral Reef Watch: Studying Corals from Space
  • Overview of the entire curriculum module

Pages